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Thread: It's Time to Train Officers Not to Kill Dogs

  1. #11
    No Hope For Me 1biggun's Avatar
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    Taping cops is not a crime
    I agree completely . an the guys filming did nothing wrong .

    how ever interfering with a officer trying to perform his duty is an so is trying to incite a riot an so so is having a loose dog . the guy who got his dog shot did at least those three . if your going to start screaming at cops in the middel of a stand of or serving a warrent tryng to get attention then expect to get aressted . theat guy was hoping some hting would happen from his stupid actions . It did he was detaiend tocontrol the scene he left his dog unsecured an it got loose an on a public side walk displayed agressive behavior an was shot . Had the officver been shot what would have happened ? maybe nothing maybe the dog would have backed off . or maybe we would eb watching a video of a officer with a 100 pound rottweiler chewing threw his throat . we also dont know what this guy was doing before the video or if he had been mouthing off previously . i think the officres maybe could have told him to get back an shut up initialy but I also dont know whatthe situation was an why they were there . It was obviously serious as there was a hell of a lot of cars. That dog could have just as easly an more likely been hit by a car after it got out .

    I have had a dog get loose an bite some one . MY springer went through a screen door an attacked a ups driver . if the driver had been armed id have not blamed him for shooting the dog . I was lucky not to be sued..I have been attacked my best frined pit bull for no reason I knew that dog from a pup an thought it was a great animal I had thrown a million balls , sticks , go cart tires, etc for it to fetch .

    MY mother had her poodle literal ripped out of her hands by a pair of rottwilers that crossed a 4 lane road an attaced the dog an her an then her boss who was ran back into a building the her dog almost died an the vet bill was close to four grand . MY dad had to be detained do keep from shooting the dogs on the front porch with a 30-06. the dog then were agressicve to offivers an should have been shot but were not . the dogs evenmtualy were picked up by animal control an quarentened. the owners a bunch of getto trolls ended up paying the bills an the doge were given back at some point but never returned . i love rottwilers I alweays wanted one but these animals should have been destroyed an there owners arrested . not sever dog is some friendy tail wagging pet my tummy Benji .

    MY neighbors rottweiler but the a guy from the air port bringing lost bags to the door . the dog was loose in the yard like always an it attacked a guy who merly drove in the drive way an bit him . My neighbor got sued . He still maintains some how it was the delivery drivers fault for delivering stuff the owner new was coming . IMO he needed to keep his dog on a chain or in the house .

    I had a stray german shepard come off the street wereI now live inthe country an attack my springer spanial right in my shop 10 feet from me as my back was turned . I would have shot it if I could have got to a fire arm fast enough .

    I personaly shot an killed the three doors down neighbors dog about 30 years ago when it attacked my littel sister in the street an tore into her leg as she rode her bicycle down the road . It wasent the first time it bit a kid an the owmer had been warned . when i went to confront the neighbor about his again loose dog ( Australian sheperad cross ) it was came after me almost in my own yard . I yelled at it to go home an it kept coming untll a 357 mag round dropped it after i kicked it away twice . I packed the Fing dog to the owners an tossed it on the door steep an then told him to expect a bill. he had little to say. an the cops never came .

    some times humans safety have to be taken over the life of a animal. I am opposed to all these dogs killed on peoples property an if a offcier is dpoing there job thye know if there is a dog there when serving a warrant an I do agree that they need more training . I also feel people need to be more responsible about there pets . I have been a dog owner who had to deal with there dog bitting some one. owning a dog is a huge responsibility . I could have lot everything as i was renting at the time an uninsured .

  2. #12
    jrs
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    B.U.F. (Bald, Ugly, Fat) jrs's Avatar
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    Thumbs up St. Louis cop accidentally shoots partner while aiming at dog

    http://now.msn.com/police-officer-sh...og-in-st-louis



    A St. Louis police officer was accidentally shot Thursday by his partner, who was trying to shoot what they said was an aggressive-looking dog. The two cops were investigating local copper thefts when they were approached by an "aggressive dog showing its teeth." One officer the one who didn't end up with a bandage on his arm pulled his gun and fired "three or four shots" at the animal. One bullet ricocheted off a sidewalk, bouncing backward and hitting his partner near his elbow. Neither officer knew if the dog had been wounded, since it quickly ran away. Although it's lucky that the officer wasn't seriously wounded, his partner might need to spend some time working on his aim.
    jrs
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    "A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within.", Will Durant

    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.", Edmund Burke

  3. #13
    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Snippit:

    When I started logging cop-shoots-dog incidents on my blog (under the probably sensational term “puppycide”), people began sending me new stories as they happened. Cops are now shooting dogs at the slightest provocation. As of this writing, I’m sent accounts of a few incidents each week.

    It’s difficult to say if this is happening more frequently. There are no national figures, and estimates are all over the map. One dog handler recently hired to train a police department in Texas estimates there are up to 250,000 cop-shoots-dog cases each year. That seems high. In 2009 Randal Lockwood of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) told the Las Vegas Review-Journal that he sees 250 to 300 incidents per year in media reports, and he estimates that another 1,000 aren’t reported. The Indianapolis Star reported that between 2000 and 2002 police in that city shot 44 dogs. A recent lawsuit filed by the Milwaukee owner of a dog killed by cops found that police in that city killed 434 dogs over a nine-year period, or about one every seven and a half days. But those figures aren’t all that helpful. They don’t say how many of those dogs were actually vicious, how many were strays, or how many were injured and perhaps killed as an act of mercy versus how many were unjustified killings of pets.

    What is clear is that police are almost always cleared of any wrongdoing in these shootings. An officer’s word that he felt a dog posed a threat to his safety is generally all it takes. Whether or not the officer’s fear was legitimate doesn’t seem to matter. Thanks to smart phones and surveillance cameras, a growing batch of these incidents have been caught on video have shown that officers’ claims that the dog was threatening often aren’t matched by the dog’s body language. In recent years, police officers have shot and killed chihuahuas, golden retrievers, labs, miniature dachshunds, Wheaton terriers, and Jack Russell terriers. In 2012 a California police officer shot and killed a boxer puppy and pregnant chihuahua, claiming the boxer had threatened him. The chihuahua, he said, got caught in the crossfire. Police officers have also recently shot dogs that were chained, tied, or leashed, going so far as to kill pets while merely questioning neighbors about a crime in the area, cutting across private property while in pursuit of a suspect, and after responding to false burglar alarms.

    It’s possible that these incidents could just be attributed to rogue cops. But the fact that the police are nearly always excused in these cases—even in the more ridiculous examples—suggests there may be an institutional problem. So does the fact that only a handful of police departments give their cops any training at all when it comes to reading and handling the dogs they may encounter. In a 2012 article for the Huffington Post, my intern J. L. Greene and I looked at twenty-four recent cases of “puppycide” and called the relevant police departments to inquire about training. Only one department could confirm that its officers received training at the time of the incident in question. (Eleven departments did not return our phone calls.) That jibes with an earlier article I wrote for The Daily Beast in which both the ASPCA and the Humane Society told me that they offer such training to any police department that wants it, while few take advantage of the offer. Joseph Pentangelo, the ASPCA’s assistant director for law enforcement, who also served twenty-one years with the NYPD, told me, “New York is the only state I know of that mandates formalized training, and that’s during academy. There are some individual departments in other parts of the country that avail themselves of our training, but not many. Not enough.”

    Given how likely it is that police officers will often interact with animals, you would think that such training would be common. It is at the US Postal Service. A spokesman for the USPS told me that while dog bites do happen on occasion, serious dog attacks on mail carriers are almost nonexistent. Postal workers are given regular training in distracting dogs with toys, subduing them with voice commands, or, at worst, incapacitating them with Mace. Mail carriers are shown a two-hour video and then given annual instruction on topics like recognizing and reading a dog’s body language and differentiating between aggressive charging and playful bounding, and between a truly dangerous dog and a merely territorial one.

    The fact that the Postal Service offers such training and most police departments don’t lends some credence to the theory that dog shootings are part of the larger problem of a battlefield mentality that lets police use lethal force in response to the slightest threat—usually with few consequences. “It’s an evolving phenomenon,” says Norm Stamper, the former Seattle police chief. “It started when drug dealers began to recruit pit bulls to guard their supply. These dogs weren’t meant to attack cops. They were meant to attack other drug dealers who came to rob them. But of course they did attack cops. And yes, that’s awfully scary if one of those things latches on to your leg.”

    But Stamper says that like many aspects of modern policing, dog shootings may have had a legitimate origin, but the practice has since become a symptom of the mind-set behind a militarized police culture. “Among other things, it really shows a lack of imagination. These guys think that the only solution to a dog that’s yapping or charging is shooting and killing it. That’s all they know. It goes with this notion that police officers have to control every situation, to control all the variables. That’s an awesome responsibility, and if you take it on, you’re caving to delusion. You no longer exercise discrimination or discretion. You have to control, and the way you control is with authority, power, and force. With a dog, the easiest way to take control is to simply kill it. I mean, especially if there are no consequences for doing so.”

    A handful of police departments do now mandate dog training, including Nashville, Omaha, and Milwaukee. Police departments in Austin, Fort Worth, and Arlington, Texas, do too. All began offering training after public backlash over one or more cop-shoots-dog incidents.

    “In my ten years in law enforcement on the street, I can’t remember one case where a police officer shot a dog,” says Russ Jones, the former narcotics cop with the San Jose Police Department and the DEA. “I don’t understand it at all. I guess somewhere along the line a cop shot a dog under questionable circumstances and got away with it. Word got out, and now it seems like some cops are just looking for reasons to take a shot at a dog. Maybe it just comes down to that—we can get away with it, therefore we do it.”

    http://www.salon.com/2013/07/07/%E2%...ut_of_control/


    Black Blade: There should be mandatory dog training by Postal Workers (or meter readers) before they are allowed to handle a firearm in public.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


  4. #14
    Gunco Regular Pryotex's Avatar
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    The only thing that frosts my ass more than the Cops who are afraid of dogs and shoot them at any chance. Is that I never hear the stories like all the dogs that I get on a leash and take to animal control VS getting shot or hit by a car. But then again that the media for ya, Bleeding heart Democrats.
    Pryotex is TEC Tactical, A Licensed 07/SOT

  5. #15
    Gunco Member 44044's Avatar
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    Cops shoot dogs to try and get the owner

    To react so they can shoot the dog's owner

  6. #16
    Gunco Member 44044's Avatar
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    Cops shoot dogs to try and get the owner

    To react so they can shoot the dog's owner

  7. #17
    No Hope For Me 1biggun's Avatar
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    Black Blade: There should be mandatory dog training by Postal Workers (or meter readers) before they are allowed to handle a firearm in public
    I agree all postal workers need to be trained about dogs.

    the springer I mentioned hated ups an postal workers . the Ups Guy she bit said he suspected the dog had been pepper sprayed an that he had co workers who spray dogs all the time, I know postal workers who have sprayed dogs . I was lucky the UPS guy did not sue he was a great guy. I paid every bit of his medical an even offered to compensate im for missing a day of work to go to the doctor . he laughed an seemed more worried about my dog that got quarantined . god people do exist .

    I dont know if my dog had been sprayed or not but I do know she never even barked at any one else excpet the post man an the ups guys . Funny she loved cops ?

  8. #18
    No Hope For Me 1biggun's Avatar
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    Cops shoot dogs to try and get the owner

    To react so they can shoot the dog's owner
    good way to get killed if there a littel slow . My last dog barked at any car or person coming in the drive ( it was chained or keneled ) Id likley be ready if they just shot it .


    funny wen a police dog is killed or injured its the same as officer an you are in big big trouble .

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