Just got an Dayton AC 100v arcwelder...
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Thread: Just got an Dayton AC 100v arcwelder...

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    High Cyclic Rate synweap223's Avatar
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    Default Just got an Dayton AC 100v arcwelder...

    Hey guys. My neighbor that is moving just gave me a Dayton 100 volt ac arcwelder with cables as a parting gift. Its adjustable from 100 down to 20 volts in 10v increments and uses standard 1/16 to 3/8 rods. Its an older unit but in pretty good condition and works (he buzzed a quick bead with it on some scrap 1/4 in steel to prove it) I'll post pics later today.

    My only welding experience was in shop class in school with a spotwelder, and using my fathers Lincoln AC225 arcwelder to practice fillet welds when I was a kid. He always told me that, "an AC welder can do any job, if you have the right rod and right voltage" I think with the right rod and settings this will be useable for welding rails in recievers. What are your suggestions for any added accessories I may need?

    I have to get to the welding supply store in town for a face shield and some 1/16 7018 rods next week. Any suggestions on what type and brand of rods to get? What do you use that works?? This welder will be used (at first) for installing rails, and some more tooling fabrication for this ADDICTING hobby, and afterwards for general repairs on whatever job pops up that needs welding. Any and all suggestions are welcome. Thanks!!!
    Last edited by synweap223; 01-20-2008 at 06:25 AM.
    "A large caliber is good to have, but its shot PLACEMENT that counts"
    Synweap223

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    NoWorkCamp4Me railbuggy's Avatar
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    I got a small one like that at WAL_MART years ago. Buy the smallest rods you can find.
    SOON-We already lost the war. You are the resistance.

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    Gunco Good ole boy kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Buy an auto darkening welding hood if you can afford it, Harbor Freight has one on sale for $50 right now. Not top of the line by any means but it works well for the hobby user.

    Buy some scrap steel from your local salvage yard or steel supply business. The steel supply places often have short pieces for sale (cutoffs) at scrap prices. Use them to weld you up a small steel welding bench, you will use it a lot when welding and it's good practice with the welder.

    Buy the 1/16" rods first, the unit only goes to 100 amps so you will be limited on steel thickness you can weld anyway.

    I dunno about welding rails in with it, burn through is gonna be real easy with a stick welder and getting into the interior to reach the rails will be difficult.

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    High Cyclic Rate synweap223's Avatar
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    Thanks kernelkrink and railbuggy for your advice.

    I'll be doing some practice this week on scrap before I even think of attempting the rails. I'm going to go through the magwell and stitch weld them in with 1/16 7018 rod. That should provide good tensile strength without being too brittle.

    I'm just a newb looking for a brand name of rod that welders use and recommend, and what ones I should avoid. If you work with this stuff and have any suggestions, please feel free to add. Thanks!!
    "A large caliber is good to have, but its shot PLACEMENT that counts"
    Synweap223

    "The way is in training"
    Miyamoto Musashi

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    Gunco Veteran pjm204's Avatar
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    I tend to think it would be really difficult to weld on the rails, you could try drilling holes and plug welding them, but you just don't have a ton of control with a stick welder. Good luck, practice.....

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    Gunco Member accumack's Avatar
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    If you have a Tractor Supply near by check them out mine carry a pretty good assortment of Hobart rods

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    Always sore, always tired Bradrock's Avatar
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    You can bend welding rods to get into tight places.
    " Save a tree...........Eat A Beaver!"

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    Gunco Member Mini-14's Avatar
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    PM sent with some tips on welding with those little machines. keep in mind I haven't built a gun yet, and I haven't welded on a gun that I can recall. so take my input for what its worth. it is geared towards welding in general.

    When you bend rod, you break off the outer coating. once that is broke off... well you'll get the idea.

    Auto darkening lenses and hoods... I have more experience with these than I care to admit to. I have also had FLASH BURN because of the bastards. I hate them, I don't use them, I would rather weld WITHOUT a hood or lens than with a "speed lense". The best lens in the world is a "#10 Gold" and make sure its the glass one not plastic. That is MY opinion and feelings.. you are the one that has to put up the money.
    I was just the guy that got paid a lot to weld fast and hot and I had to be able to keep my hood down all day. Seconds add to minutes and minutes add to hours and the more seconds that hood is down, the more weld you put in and the happier the company is, and the more happy they are paying you not only the big bucks but also more than the other guy. That was another lifetime ago.. so take it for what it's worth.

    People that like those things like them.. me I just hate them.

    Some advice on "speed lenses". That is auto darkening for most other people. I had some of the originals back when they became main stream. This was when they were still $500-600USD. The company bought them for us, so I was more than willing to try them and use them until I got some experience with the. Keep your outter lens clean! If it gets smokey and spattered, it WILL interfere with the photo-eye on the lens. That WILL cause you to get flashed. So keep your outter wiped off. If it gets spattered up and you start to get flashed, replace it. If you are welding and there is a lot of smoke between your hood and the weld, expect to get flashed. With those 2 things in mind, and other than that.. they work pretty good.
    Also small wire machines do not usually have enough light in the arc to keep the lenses DARK. This will cause you to get flashed.

    Hope this helps you some.
    Mini-14

  9. #9
    Gunco Member bigwheeler's Avatar
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    If you ad filler you cause shrinkage, (warping) Stay with plug welds when ever possible
    if you are going to use an arc welder on the inside rails. It will be a lot easier to clean up the
    outside than inside the receiver as well. Ask for some fast freeze rod if you decide to
    stay inside. It will stay flatter than the 7018 sheet metal rod does. The 7018 is right
    for the top rails, set the receiver on an angle and run down hill. (you will be able to run
    a lot faster and thus ad a lot less heat to the parts.) I have used up to 60 degrees or
    so for the angle but you'll have to play with it for your welder and rod. I would also run
    20 ft or so of bead on scrap ( near identical to what you will be working with) after you
    get your process down. It will teach you a lot about how the sheet metal is going to act
    as it gets hotter. Tighten your arc gap up to cool the weld as the piece heats.

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