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Thread: Advice - best beginner reference

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    Gunco Veteran nkluksda's Avatar
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    Default Advice - best beginner reference

    I'm looking for advice on a very good beginner's reference on lathe and mill. As the kids get older, I'm looking for new hobbies, and being creative in the shop has always been fun. Starting to work with metal seems like a nice new way to while away some hours. Hence, I'd like to find a good reference book to start reading and begin some learning. I know that the real learning is going to start whenever I get some tooling and start turning metal into little pieces of metal, but I'd like to have an idea of the vernacular, tool parts, the stuff one can do, etc - that I could find in a reference book.
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    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
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    Hello nkluksda,
    A nice little beginners lathe book is the HOW TO RUN A LATHE by South Bend Lathe, Inc. Copies are still available from South Bend, or Lindsay Publications, Inc (on line too).

    Lindsay Publications has many older machinery books available as reproductions at very modest prices.

    I like the college level machinery texts with lots of cool pictures and quality binding etc. These tend to be very spendy unless purchased used at a student used book store (on campus usuallly). MACHINESHOP OPERATIONS AND SETUPS, by Iascoe, Nelson, and Porter, American Technical Society, Chicago 60637...

    MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY by Repp, McCarthy... Bennett & McKnight Publishing Co, Peoria, IL.

    TOOL DESIGN by Donaldson, LeCain, and Goold,. publisher: McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, etc... This is an advanced tooling design book for engineering students.

    You simplest route would likely be via Lindsay Publishing. Get their free catalog(s) and have fun.

    VD

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    Gunco Veteran nkluksda's Avatar
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    I seem to recall someone talking about an Army Technical Manual relating to machine work. I can't find a reference again, though. Does anyone know of the book I'm talking about?
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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Here's all you need:

    9-524-machine-tool-training

    Gunco Member #10

    http://pookieweb.net


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    U.N.C.L.E. Illya Kuryakin's Avatar
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    Another great skill you might want to develop, if you don't already have it, is to learn to weld. MIG or TIG IMHO are the handiest. I use my welder almost as much as I use my compressor. Handy skill to have.


    Did I do that?

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    Indian Admin Winn R's Avatar
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    I'm trying to learn how to tig weld now.

    Defying all logic, the skills do not seem to be acquirable through anything other than hands on.

    The permutations of amperage, tungsten make up, tungsten point size, gas flow, filler make up and shape and on and on...

    I'm not real happy with my progress.
    There is no nonsense so errant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action. -- Bertrand Russell


    "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity." Robert J. Hanlon

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    Gunco Veteran nkluksda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcpookie View Post
    Here's all you need:

    9-524-machine-tool-training

    To quote Charlie Brown, "THAT'S IT!!!!"
    Thanks - I was wondering if I was imagining things.

    Yeah, I've got a wire-feed and MIG welder. It's been a lot of fun to play with. As a friend put it, now that I've got a welder, there's no such thing as scrap metal any more...
    Q - What is Bambi?

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    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
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    Hello Winn R,
    Here are several welding texts that are first class and very comprehensive.

    Welding and Other Joining Processes by Lindberg and Braton, Blitz Publishing Company, 1983.

    Handbook of Welding by Funk and Rieber, Breton Publishers, Boston, Mass, 1985.

    Welding Technology by Kennedy, Bobbs-Merrill Educational Publishing, Indianapolis, 1982.

    Get with a friend who does good welding to learn from them. Another approach is to take a welding course at a local trade school or JC. Night classes can be handy.

    Good welding comes from doing LOTS of welding with proper guidance up front. Thick material is easier to weld than thin sheet metal. Start by simply running a clean weld bead on a thick plate of steel. There are any number of tricks to learn as you go to make nicer welds.

    For example: try to match the thickness of your wire or electrode filler to that of the work thickness.

    When welds resemble bird dirt (or worse) slow down a bit and boost the juice.

    When welds burn through the work speed up or reduce the juice or use a chill block backing to the work or all of the above.

    For MIG welding (GMAW) there are charts to help you set the current level, wire feed rate, and CO2 flow for the sort of work you are trying to do.

    I started my welding adventure with a "Solid Ox" torch set up from Sears in a small apartment while still in the Army. I succedded in burning a hole through the carpet and learning how to repair carpet. Years later I took a welding course while at the university and even welded the exhaust system for a friend's car.

    VD

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    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
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    Hello Winn R, (again)
    TIG welding is simply torch welding with an electric-powered "torch". It is baisically for thin metal work and with a foot pedal is very controllable. It can help to steady your wrist on the welding table (wear gloves). Also an auto-darkening helmet is very nice to use.

    If you have done oxy-acetylene welding the TIG torch is not too complex. It is more challenging than MIG. When your nice-looking TIG bead suddenly turns to dog dirt that means you have run out of argon gas !!! Another common hassel is contaminating the tungsten tip in the weld puddle. Re-grind that tip on a "green wheel" and keep that tip out of the puddle.

    Lots of background lighting helps you see the work better when welding.

    VD

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    Indian Admin Winn R's Avatar
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    Thanks to several that have given help and, nkluksda, my apologies for hijacking your thread. I've been, and am still at, learning how to use an old Bridgeport and Logan.

    I've tryed tooling u for online courses with mixed results, negative ones arising from my impatience. I generally look for help when trying to machine an oblong slot on the inside of a receiver --- no general course gives me the specific answer I want now.

    Viper Dude -- I hadn't thought of better background lighting. I find it hard to see and move the puddle. Maybe that'll help.
    There is no nonsense so errant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action. -- Bertrand Russell


    "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity." Robert J. Hanlon

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