Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: I got a Beaver milling machine

  1. #11
    Gunco Veteran perry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,012
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    go and rent a forklift for a day or two.

  2. #12
    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,686
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Hello Dark Knight,
    I have used a tilt bed trailer and come-alongs to both load and unload heavy machinery. The come-alongs (or winches) are attached at the base of the machine. The mill head is turned down and the table is lowered to lower the center of gravity for a safe move. Use strong tie-downs especially to keep the machine from sliding forward on a panic stop. Plywood under a machine helps keep them in place during a move.

    Back the trailer into your shop/garage etc, tilt it down and winch the machine off. I have also anchored the machine with chains to a fixed post (or deadman) and driven the tilted trailer out from under it (slowly) !!!! Get a couple of stout friends to help in your move.

    A pallet jack is also a handy way to move your mill around the shop. Thick wall pipe can be useful rollers to move the mill around on a concrete floor. I have used them on a dirt yard and it was a real bitch !!! We had to build a road-like surface of planks etc. The push was from a 2x12 plank and a 3/4 ton pick-up truck !!! The plank acts like a shuffle board stick at the machine's base.

    Those 90 degree angle milling attachments are neet and SPENDY. It seems like everyone wants one. For the price I'd shop for a small horizontal mill !!! More machinery is always better (providing there is space available). Some small horizontal mills have become almost cult items like the Atlas-Clausing bench mills and are way over-priced today. I had one once and miss it.

    VD

  3. #13
    Gunco Regular The Dark Knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    552
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)

    Default

    Well a buddy of mine is going to let me borrow his trailer and my dad's truck can haul it. I got a couple of opitions i haven't worked out yet. I have a good dolly my grandma got for me, a come- along and access to a heavy pallet jack for free. The cool thing is if i need to rent anything there is a rental company around here that is great to work with. I have rented a bob cat, jack hammer and other stuff from them. I called them and they have two tons lifts to rent.

    The hardest part is my driveway its not long but steep and rough. I don't know if I can get a good enough run to get the trailer up the hill (there is always a hill in WV). I'll take pics because if I can get it in there it will be somthing to see.

    VD, I don't think I'll have room for a horizontal mill but it's cool how cheap you can get some of them. I been looking on ebay and there is always cheap ones on there.

  4. #14
    Cranky Curmudgeon zoom6zoom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,496
    Feedback Score
    5 (100%)

    Default

    I got a Beaver milling machine
    So the question no one has asked...is a milled beaver better than the regular kind?

  5. #15
    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,686
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Hello Dark Knight,
    One way to tackle that hill at home is using a tow truck. The tow truck can lift the mill from your trailer and BACK up the steep hill with it into your garage. Then he can place it on a pallet jack, rollers, etc for you to position as desired.

    VD
    Last edited by Viper Dude; 04-10-2010 at 09:55 AM. Reason: caca spelling

  6. #16
    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PA Where the Amish Roam Free
    Posts
    14,039
    Feedback Score
    38 (100%)

    Default

    Yeah I wouldn't chance using a pallet jack to get it off the trailer.
    The tow truck idea is a good one, but also check with a rental shop for any type of equiptment that can lift it, even a good engine hoist could work.
    "Government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem" Ronald Reagan

  7. #17
    Gunco Regular The Dark Knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    552
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)

    Default

    I borrowed a lift it should come in handy. I'm going to pick it up tomorrow.

    What are some things i can do to look for slop and the condition when I go to pick it up? I've research some tips but I could find much. Is there a way I can test the ways and the quill for wear?

  8. #18
    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,686
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Hello Dark Knight,
    Turn the mill on and listen to the motor, transmission and quill for sounds of bad bearing(s) and chatter or squeal at several speed settings.

    Place the table in the center position and bump up against it to see if it displaces. This assumes that the table can be traversed fully in X and Y axis without jamming. By "displacing" I mean moving sideways where it shouldn't.

    Turn the hand wheels to get an idea of how much lash is in the X and Y axis. Keep in mind that not all lash is screw or nut wear. It can also be simple thrust bearing looseness or loose drive nuts which are no big deal and can be fixed easilly.

    Most older, used mills are worn in the center location because everyone uses them in that area.

    Check for indications of proper lubing. Look for damage and broken parts or cracking. Find out what happened to missing parts.

    Look for signs of mickey mouse repair to damage such as welded or odd replaced handwheels and levers.

    Happy shopping !!! PS: Please take a camera and get some cool pics in good lighting to share of your adventure.

    VD
    Last edited by Viper Dude; 04-16-2010 at 04:23 PM. Reason: add comment...

  9. #19
    Gunco Regular The Dark Knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    552
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)

    Default

    Thanks VD will do. I think I got a good deal I have been looking and mills this size seem to go for much more. From what I can tell it is in good shape the only bad thing is the power feed is gone on the X axis. The trac is still there so I'll probably fix it somehow. The seller is a nice guy he said if i didn't like it I could have my money back. So I'm sure he won't mind me checking it out real good.

    I did some research and saw some poeple saying int 30 was the same as R8 is this true? The beaver could be int 40 or 30 I would rather have int 40 it looks tougher and most poeple who had it seemed to like it. But if int 30 is the same as R8 that wouldn't be to bad either.

  10. #20
    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,686
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Hello Dark Knight,
    The Standard #30 and #40 tapers are not the same whatsoever as the R-8. The Std #30 and #40 tapers use a notched flange to drive them. The R-8 uses a keyway on the side of the taper for driving. They also look very different from the R-8.

    The Std NT# 30 is smaller size than the #40 but are the same shape. A Standard NT #30 sounds more likely the size for your mill. My K&T Milwaukee 2H universal uses Std NT #50 tooling. That is very large stuff !!

    You should mark your tooling with a marker pen for now until you become familiar. That way if you spot some cool tools at a sale or on-line, etc you will know whether to pounce on the stuff or no.

    VD

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Search tags for this page

There are currently no search engine referrals.
Click on a term to search our site for related topics.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •