Mig Welders
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Thread: Mig Welders

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    Default Mig Welders

    We are in need of a decent and affordable Mig for general farm use and equipment repair. TSC has a Hobart 140 that I've been eyeballing.

    Is this a decent welder for the money?
    Hobart Handler 140 MIG Welder - 3812040 | Tractor Supply Company

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    Chief Administrator 7.62x39's Avatar
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    I have that exact same welder. It has always worked very well up to about 1/4" stock. I have not tried to weld anything thicker than that.
    Any and all welding questions should be sent to my buddy zapster. He is a magician with a welder and a mod on a large welding forum. He can answer any questions you may have and is a super guy always ready to help. Tell him I sent you.

    http://www.gunco.net/forums/f235/good-afternoon-68413/
    .

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    Always sore, always tired Bradrock's Avatar
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    I have had a Lincoln Weldpak 100 for eight years or so. It looks exactly like your Hobart only it's RED. It's been fine for me & I even used to take it in the camper trailer for dredge repairs & picked up extra cash from other campers! They are real handy. But I must say...now that we have the small 20 acre farm I miss the Lincoln 225 stick welder I left behind in Florida. I guess a guy really needs MIG, TIG, Stick & gas & A plasma cutter to feel whole!
    " Save a tree...........Eat A Beaver!"

    I seldom talk to liberals.............................. But when I do, I order fries............

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    Chief Administrator 7.62x39's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradrock View Post
    But I must say...now that we have the small 20 acre farm I miss the Lincoln 225 stick welder I left behind in Florida.
    How many gazzilion of those do you suppose Lincoln sold over the years?
    That's what I first learned how to weld on back in the late 60s. I bought one of my own back in mid 70s for IIRC $99. They are still cranking them out today and appear to be pretty much unchanged in all that time.
    .

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    Gunco Maniac twa2471's Avatar
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    I had one of the Lincoln's for years, as have a bazillion other people, but went with a Hobart 220amp/ 220 v mig later,, great machine. Most out there now are pretty decent but what ever you get be sure to get one you can use the gas through. The smaller 115 volt ones that use flux core wire are OK but nothing I'd use for guns. They leave air pockets in the welds just like a stick welder does on occasion and you have the flux to contend with afterwards.

    I had the Hobart for 20+ years and only had to replace the wire feed rollers on it, well the cable too but only because someone ran over that with the fork lift and I used that welder a ton between working in body shops and later in the marina. Especially for stainless and aluminum welding,, Awsome machine and what I'd recomend.

    Spend the few extra bucks for a 220 amp if you have farm equeptment to work on to, believe me you won't be sorry, the 120's won't cut it there. Also if your doing any heavy welding, 1/4" or better or continuous welding you'll want to check the "duty cycle", the amount of time you can weld at full power without stopping. Not much of a factor for a homeowner, but a huge issue for any commercial type use, or farm use. Plus you're not over working the machine and making it fry a transformer. Minimum of 50% duty cycle will get you through most anything for the average joe, longer duty cycle if using commercially.

    You can get a pretty versitile machine for 2K-2500 that will do everything and last a lifetime, probably 2 lifetimes, and those will will mig, tig and aluminum weld all in one machine, and will weld really thick shit if needed, just need to change gas and rollers for aluminum. Anouther good hint, use 100% argon gas even tough more expensive, you get super clean welds with steel and stainless and it's a must for aluminum welding, it makes one machine pull double duty, ya just have to change out the liner and feed rollers to use the aluminum wire, but very easy to do. I'm sure there's other tings I forgot to mention ,but I'm sure someone else will fill in what ever I forgot to mention.

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    The venerable 'tombstone Linclon' stick welder. The workhorse.
    There are 2 of those in separate barns but what I'm after is something that will do thinner metals and bodywork. It seems the Hobart should fill that niche pretty well.. For the price..

    I'm thinking the 120 because I only pulled 1 220 circuit in that building and it's running a monstrosity of a compressor. The whole building is running off of a subpanel about 250 feet from the main on 10/3 cable so I was a little concerned about overloading it with a 220 welder.

    We'll only be using it for light duty type stuff. AK rails to cracked tractor hoods. The big heavy stuff can be done with the tombstones. They are wired strait from the main 200A service panel.

    I saw that thread Zapster posted with the hand-crafted manifold and utility blades welded together. That is some truly impressive work.

    I've been seeing alot of the self-darkening helmets for sale. Do you guys trust them?
    It seemed to me that it only has to fail one time and your vision is screwed for life.

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    Always sore, always tired Bradrock's Avatar
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    The self darkening helmets are like a miracle & you will never go back once you try one.Even my cheap harbor freight one works great. It's also nice to be able to adjust without changing lenses.
    " Save a tree...........Eat A Beaver!"

    I seldom talk to liberals.............................. But when I do, I order fries............

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    Gunco Good ole boy kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tanvil View Post
    I've been seeing alot of the self-darkening helmets for sale. Do you guys trust them?
    It seemed to me that it only has to fail one time and your vision is screwed for life.


    If they are ANSI approved, they block all UV light even when "clear". At worst ya get a bright flash of light before your eyes close.

    Dunno about "vision is screwed for life", been welding going on 40 years now and it is rare when a weld job doesn't involve an accidental flash now and again. Especially back when the flip type helmet was all that was available. Other than nearsighted I can see OK.

    I use the cheapo Harbor Feight model with no issues. More expensive units ya get heavier construcion and possibly better electronics but the HF units seem to work OK for a hobbyist like me.

  10. #9
    Chief Administrator 7.62x39's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tanvil View Post
    .... what I'm after is something that will do thinner metals and bodywork. It seems the Hobart should fill that niche pretty well.. For the price..

    ...We'll only be using it for light duty type stuff. AK rails to cracked tractor hoods.
    Exactly the type of jobs I use it for. Anything up to 1/4" it works mint. I don't use it a lot so a tank of the CO2/Argon mix lasts me a forever.

    I also have a self darkening helmet, definitely the way to go.
    .

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    Gunco Maniac twa2471's Avatar
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    Love the self darkining helmets too. Myself I'd way rather use a mig or tig better than anything else now, but just my preference, but for pipe, stick is still the way to go, and the only thing certified for that application, if I'm not mistaken.

    I got the same issue with shitty wire to my garage too tanvil, and will eventually have to address that issue sense I want a lift to work under my hot rods with. Mines so weak I can't even get it to fire up a 3hp commpressor without tripping the breaker in the house. Sounds like the 120 will work for what you have in mind, but don't forget the more you weld,,,,, the more friends you'll have ,,,,all of a sudden, and heavy welding could be in your future. Even your own projects.

    Do get one with the ability to use the shielding gas though,,,, you won't be sorry there. The flux wire is dirty dirty dirty.

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