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Thread: Lathe/Mill questions...

  1. #11
    Gunco Member HeritageMX's Avatar
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    My advice,

    Get a lathe first. Along with it buy a copy of South Bends "How to run a lathe" It's a book from the 30's and 40's but everything in it is still applicable and it's written before the era of all the cover your ass legal stuff. In fact buy the book first and it will help you decide if this is for you.

    Every thing you will learn with your lathe you can apply to your mill.

    Also get a copy of MACHINERYS HANDBOOK refer to this when starting to cut anything. If you pay attention to speeds, feed rates and lubrication/cooling you won't break many tools. You can buy a old one of these books as well and save the $$

    If you have a good head on your shoulders with the help of these books and lots of hands on practice you will be the go to guy in your neiborhood. Nobody learns how to do this stuff anymore. Glad to see you are interested.

  2. #12
    DADDY WARBUCKS Custer's Avatar
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    He is lucky to live in an area loaded with small and large machine shops. Cincinnati has a rich tradition in that activity and it is still quite strong.

    Granted, it is harder than it used to be to find people who wish to learn the trade.
    Everyone had you pegged.

  3. #13
    Throbbing Member scheistermeister's Avatar
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    working with metal is something i always wanted to be able to do. anything where im working with my hands and not stuck infront of a computer ill usually enjoy. computers can be fun, but after 11 years of working with them and sitting in front of one all day i like to get away from them.

    now the kind of stuff im wanting to to would mainly be gun stuff with maybe occasionally doing something car related. would i be better off with a mini-lathe or a regular lathe?


  4. #14
    Everyone NEEDS a Glock! glock's Avatar
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    I can't find it but there's an online machine shop which lets you virtually run lathes and mills I can't find the link though. Does anyone have it?
    If any punk kid ever comes up to you asking for your `Gang Sign` Tap your chest twice then your forehead once. After doing that only upon a threat do you draw your glock and show him what you meant.




    WOLVERINES!

  5. #15
    Everyone NEEDS a Glock! glock's Avatar
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    i found this to read but I want the link to the online shop that lets you play with the tools http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/
    If any punk kid ever comes up to you asking for your `Gang Sign` Tap your chest twice then your forehead once. After doing that only upon a threat do you draw your glock and show him what you meant.




    WOLVERINES!

  6. #16
    Gunco Good ole boy kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Gun work on a lathe means bbl work most of the time. Firing pin making and bolt work being the other main uses. To do proper bbl work you will need a headstock spindle bore large enough to feed a bbl through. 1 inch is about a minimum, larger is ideal. That leaves most mini lathes out of the picture. `

  7. #17
    Gunco Regular smittygj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glock
    i found this to read but I want the link to the online shop that lets you play with the tools http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/
    I learned everything I know (and am currently still learning) from my partner in this AK Bending Jig business that we are running making Kernel Krinks's Jig (Thanks KernelKrink!!!). He does everything the old school way, which has taught me alot. I also learned quite a bit from the link above. I read it, watched the video's, then went and did it. It's a wealth of info to get you started. I have to say though, now that I've learned it, I'm going CNC just as soon as I get enough $$$$ to either retrofit the mill or buy a new (or used) one.

  8. #18
    Gunco Member recoilless's Avatar
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    JJJtrain is a good online source. Audel's also has a series of three books that are good for beginners although a used copy of machinery's HB could be puchased for the same price as all three easily. My advice for beginners would be to
    1. Know the capacity and limitations of youe equipment.
    2. Know what type of materials you are working with ( a lot of choices ou there)
    3. Master the speed and feed. There are simple formulas that pertain to cutter make up vs. material being cut. This is where most rookies that are self taught go astray
    4. Have a plan and be SAFE and PATIENT
    5. (This should be No. 1) ALWAYS REMOVE THE KEY FROM THE CHUCK!!!!!!

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