Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Rogers & Spencer

  1. #1
    Gunco Member 67yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Quinault rain forest,Wa.
    Posts
    126
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default Rogers & Spencer

    Here are a few pics from an old relic I got from a friend who literally dug it up while demolishing an old garage barn with his Hitachi shovel. This pistol is a fine crafted weapon, after holding it, my S&W 629 8 3/8 seems the lesser of quality. The old timers really took pride in their craft. If any one knows about this pistol let me know, my sidekick wants me to sell it and split the booty.
    It has Rogers & Spencer and UTICAN-NY on the top strap, there are 2 "B"s and the letter "X" stamped on the left grip panel and the serial # 4147 is stamped on the upper side of the forward part of the loading lever, and the # 41 is stamped on the other portion that serves as axis for the magazine.
    The holster has "7 1/2" and the #5 stamped on the belt loop





    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 67yankee; 10-07-2010 at 02:09 AM. Reason: correct marking
    April 19, 1775 An English attempt to confiscate firearms from Americans, triggered a successful revolution

  2. #2
    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PA Where the Amish Roam Free
    Posts
    14,039
    Feedback Score
    38 (100%)

    Default

    You need to get a hold of someone that specializes in these types of guns, they make a reproduction of this model (first link below), and that thing looks to be in excellent condition to be a mid to late 1800's gun. (second link)
    Oh and it looks like you typed it wrong but it should be UTICA-NY, town & state, not trying to be a dick just pointing it out.
    Dixie Gun Works muzzleloading, blackpowder and rare antique gun supplies.
    Army Revolvers

    So you really need to know what it is, your looking at something worth a couple hundred to maybe ten thousand+
    "Government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem" Ronald Reagan

  3. #3
    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    7,452
    Feedback Score
    15 (100%)

    Default

    It's hard to make out from the pictures, but the top strap *may* actually be stamped UTICAN-Y
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

  4. #4
    GuncoHolic zteknik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,457
    Feedback Score
    15 (100%)

    Default

    sweet piece!and luck!!
    its a bit outa my collection range but i think rodgers and spencer refers to the designers
    spencer from the civil war spencer carbine
    and rodgers i dont know but im sure if you search it you can find out
    i think it might be a valuable find
    any history of where he found it?like the previous owners past?
    if you can link it to someone of historical importance you might be surprised at the prices itll fetch!!
    good luck with it!!
    Keep the change-I just want my Country back!!!

  5. #5
    Gunco Member 67yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Quinault rain forest,Wa.
    Posts
    126
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coils View Post
    You need to get a hold of someone that specializes in these types of guns, they make a reproduction of this model (first link below), and that thing looks to be in excellent condition to be a mid to late 1800's gun. (second link)
    Oh and it looks like you typed it wrong but it should be UTICA-NY, town & state, not trying to be a dick just pointing it out.
    Dixie Gun Works muzzleloading, blackpowder and rare antique gun supplies.
    Army Revolvers

    So you really need to know what it is, your looking at something worth a couple hundred to maybe ten thousand+
    You are right Coils, it is stamped N.Y., thanks for catching that...
    April 19, 1775 An English attempt to confiscate firearms from Americans, triggered a successful revolution

  6. #6
    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PA Where the Amish Roam Free
    Posts
    14,039
    Feedback Score
    38 (100%)

    Default

    I didn't know if it was that way or you just typed it too fast.

    But let us know what you find out, I think it's a nice looking and interesting pistol
    "Government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem" Ronald Reagan

  7. #7
    Gunco Member 67yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Quinault rain forest,Wa.
    Posts
    126
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    You know zteknik, has made a good point in checking it's history....I don't understand the laws about getting an antique registered, especially the way it was found. The property owners were only interested in improving their real estate and just gave it away. What concerns me is if it were stolen from a previous owner. I will have the sn# checked out with my local gun dealer right away. It being an antique doesn't make it exempt from ownership.....
    April 19, 1775 An English attempt to confiscate firearms from Americans, triggered a successful revolution

  8. #8
    TRX
    TRX is online now
    Gunco Irregular TRX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    2,645
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)

    Default

    I thought I knew old revolvers fairly well, and I've never heard of Rogers & Spencer.

    [snip]

    Rogers & Spencer Revolver - May 2000

    The Rogers & Spencer Percussion Revolver was originally manufactured in Willowvale, NY about 1863-65. In January 1865, the United States government contracted with Rogers & Spencer for 5,000 of the solid frame pistols. Delivery on the contract was made too late for war service, and the entire lot was sold as scrap to Francis Bannerman and Son in 1901. Bannerman then sold the pistols throughout the first quarter of the 20th Century. Many original Rogers & Spencer revolvers are seen today in excellent, near mint condition.

    The Rogers and Spencer Army Model Revolver was actually an improvement of earlier pistols produced by the firm - the Pettingill and Freeman revolvers. The Pettingills were produced in the late 1850's and early 1860's, and were double action revolvers. The Pettingills were ahead of their time, being designed as hammerless pistols, which were popular in the last decade of the 19th Century, but certainly too avant garde for Army purchasers. The Navy Model was a .34 caliber, of which less than 1,000 were produced. The Army Model was a .44 caliber, and only about 3,400 were produced in the early 1860's. The Freeman Army Model Revolver was a solid frame .44 caliber pistol with a round 7 1/2" barrel, of which 2,000 are believed to have been produced in 1863-64, and in appearance the Freeman resembles a Starr Revolver.

    The Rogers & Spencer is an improved Freeman, with a less severe grip style, a heavier frame and a stronger octagon barrel of identical 7 1/2" length. Interestingly, the Rogers & Spencer design is eligible for N-SSA competitions because the contract was consummated before the end of hostilities.

    The current reproduction of the Rogers & Spencer Army Model Revolver is produced in Italy and available from several merchants who deal in blackpowder pistols.

    [/snip]

    I guess the first thing is to figure out of it's a real one or a reproduction. Either way, it looks like a nice find!

  9. #9
    Gunco Member 67yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Quinault rain forest,Wa.
    Posts
    126
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zteknik View Post
    sweet piece!and luck!!
    its a bit outa my collection range but i think rodgers and spencer refers to the designers
    spencer from the civil war spencer carbine
    and rodgers i dont know but im sure if you search it you can find out
    i think it might be a valuable find
    any history of where he found it?like the previous owners past?
    if you can link it to someone of historical importance you might be surprised at the prices itll fetch!!
    good luck with it!!

    You are right about linking it with historical evidence, and another factor I have just learned is it also is worth a lot more with the original bluing intact. It only needs to be fired a few times for the temperature to reach 800 degrees for the bluing to flake off as shown in the pic of the pistol. The pistol is an original and have been offered 80% of it's value of $2,800 . The small chip missing from the handle and loss of bluing dropped it's potential value of $3,500 or higher, and as you say if it were linked with some historical character it would even be worth a lot more.
    April 19, 1775 An English attempt to confiscate firearms from Americans, triggered a successful revolution

  10. #10
    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PA Where the Amish Roam Free
    Posts
    14,039
    Feedback Score
    38 (100%)

    Default

    The small chip missing from the handle and loss of bluing dropped it's potential value
    If that's the original bluing, I think it's in excellent condition for it's age. Is it museum quality? Most likely not, but it's still in great shape.
    "Government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem" Ronald Reagan

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Search tags for this page

There are currently no search engine referrals.
Click on a term to search our site for related topics.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •