Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: First Aid Kits

  1. #1
    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    7,691
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)

    Default First Aid Kits

    Tried searching but I cant' find a thread already. It seems "aid" is too short a word to produce anything valuable and "first" is too vague. Anyway... looking to build up a good 3-4 day kit. Lots of kits out there FS nowadays but to me they are extremely overpriced. I am NOT planning to do any surgery unless it is to remove a splinter because I'm not qualified, so I don't need any of that "for military use" trauma stuff. Thinking about sprains, cuts, broken bones, etc. Stuff you'd expect to get on a camping trip scenario. Maybe even burns.

    This is what I have so far... anything to add? A tourniquet? Other medicines? Quick-clot stuff? Anything else?


    Adhesive bandages in a variety of sizes
    -----------------------------------------
    • 1 adhesive cloth tape (10 yards x 1 inch)
    • 2 absorbent compress dressings (5 x 9 inches)
    • 25 adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
    • 1 roller bandage (3 inches wide)
    • 1 roller bandage (4 inches wide)
    • 5 sterile gauze pads (3 x 3 inches)
    • 5 sterile gauze pads (4 x 4 inches)
    • 2 triangular bandages
    • 1 sterile gauze trauma pad: 5" x 9" (12.7cm x 22.9cm)
    • 5 waterproof bandages: 1" x 3" (2.54cm x 7.62cm)
    • 5 butterfly closures

    Medicines
    -----------
    • 5 antibiotic ointment packets (approximately 1 gram)
    • 5 antiseptic wipe packets
    • Cleansing agent/soap
    • 3 burn cream packets
    • alcohol prep pads
    • lip balm
    • sunscreen lotion
    • sting relief pads
    • poison ivy cleanser towelette
    • insect repellent packets
    • allergy medicine(s)
    • cold medicine
    • smelling salts

    First Aid Supplies:
    ---------------------------
    • Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant
    • Nonlatex gloves (size: large)
    • Oral thermometer (non-mercury/nonglass)
    • Tweezers
    • Drawing salve
    • Scissors
    • First aid instruction booklet
    • finger splints
    • safety pins
    • cotton tip applicators
    • tick tweezer
    • snakebite kit

    Non-prescription drugs:
    -------------------------
    • Aspirin
    • Anti-diarrhea medication
    • Antacid
    • Laxative
    • Eye wash solution (visene etc)

    Additional Supplies:
    ----------------------
    • space blanket
    • breathing barrier (with one-way valve)
    • instant cold compress
    • hydrocortisone ointment packets (approximately 1 gram each)
    • moleskin
    • small mirror
    • poison ivy (cortizone?)
    • Calamine lotion
    • moist towelettes
    • compression bandage
    • safety pins
    • moldable SAM splint / wire splint
    • liquid skin
    Last edited by hcpookie; 12-08-2012 at 09:39 AM.
    Gunco Member #10

    http://pookieweb.net


    The "original" Boltcutter Rivet Squeezers:
    http://pookieweb.net/AK/rivet/boltcutters/boltcutter.htm


    Project Pink - the Pink and Blue AK-74:
    http://pookieweb.net/pink/pink.htm

  2. #2
    TRX
    TRX is online now
    Gunco Irregular TRX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    2,647
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)

    Default

    My motorcycle kit has:

    2 packs of quick-clot
    3' of surgical tubing (powdered, in a Ziploc, so it doesn't stick to itself)
    1 small roll of gauze
    1 roll of tape
    3 chemical light sticks
    1 large plastic trash bag
    1 single-edge razor blade
    1 mylar "space blanket"

    I also carry a flashlight all the time, so it's technically not part of the kit.

    The contents of the kit were decided on after extensive thought about the situations I might encounter. Spurting blood - quick clot, then the tourniquet if it comes down to that. Gauze to cover an eye socket or for "feel-good" over cuts. Trash bag and tape to cover a sucking chest wound or exposed intestines. Razor blade to cut away clothing and cut tape or plastic.

    Space blanket to help deal with shock, cold weather, coverage from rain, and visibility to find the injured person again.

    Light sticks - one for the injured person, two to mark the crash site so I and/or an ambulance can find it.

    For a motorcycle crash, my thought is that other than stanching spurting blood, or a sucking chest wound, there's not a whole lot I can do. So the plan is to deal with that to keep them alive, then (worst case, I'm the only person available) I mark the site and ride off for help. Cold, dark, and rain are also likely factors.

    Dressings and gauze aren't very useful; any wounds are probably going to be dirty to start with, and the EMTs will cut them off as soon as they arrive. The only reason I have the small roll of gauze is that people tend to pick at things that are hanging out that shouldn't be; covering them can prevent additional damage.

    With the incidence of contagious diseases being so high nowadays, you'd better hope someone else shows up who knows CPR, because I ain't gonna. I'll do the obsolete style that depended entirely on chest compressions if I need to.

    The last time I was at a crash there was no phone service, so I had to stop motorists and send them off for help. I wound up staying with the guy who wrecked. (he lost a leg to a road sign) Send three or four people, preferably in different directions. If there are no people around, you'll have to do the best you can and then go off for help on your own.

    Snakebite isn't something you normally have to worry about on a motorcycle, but if you're in the woods it would be important to have a snakebite kit. If you're going to be out for days you'll probably want tools to remove splinters or objects left in puncture wounds, and maybe a needle and thread to sew up gaping wounds.

  3. #3
    Citizen, Patriot, Ranger bellson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
    Posts
    2,607
    Feedback Score
    7 (100%)

    Default

    My $0.02:

    • More Tape.
    • More Trauma pads.
    • A roll of wire mesh.
    • One or more Ace Bandages.
    • A razor blade, or a disposable razor.
    • A small sewing kit, or just some needles / pins. I like the T-Top style since they are easy to hold.
    • Consider some sutures, and add more butterflies. There is also a glue that you can use to improve the effectiveness.
    • Add Superglue, or liquid bandage.
    • Add more gauze bandages and rolls. Cheap insurance.
    • The light Sticks are a great idea, need to add that to mine.
    • I'll think of more....
    Imagine whirled peas

    Peace, Love, And Superior Firepower






    Bellson

  4. #4
    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    7,691
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)

    Default

    "roll of wire mesh" - not sure what that is?

    "liquid bandage" - same as liquid skin that is the stuff used to "glue" minor cuts?

    Also read that some of the quick-clot stuff is shellfish based, and some people like my wife with shellfish allergies could have reactions. Any options that aren't shellfish-based?
    Gunco Member #10

    http://pookieweb.net


    The "original" Boltcutter Rivet Squeezers:
    http://pookieweb.net/AK/rivet/boltcutters/boltcutter.htm


    Project Pink - the Pink and Blue AK-74:
    http://pookieweb.net/pink/pink.htm

  5. #5
    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    5,353
    Feedback Score
    20 (100%)

    Default

    You stated that you won't need a surgical kit with the exception of digging out a splinter.

    As a hardwood flooring guy, splinters are an everyday occurrence.

    I've streamlined removal into a fine art.

    Toss a couple of hook blades in your kit. You can control the depth of the cut you are making for removing the small pieces of the splinter that stay behind and fester into infection. Also good for cutting seatbelts and clothing, if you install the blade into a knife handle.

    You can find them in any hardware section next to the utility blades, in packs of 5 or a 50 pack dispenser.

    We also use them for skinning game.

  6. #6
    Citizen, Patriot, Ranger bellson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
    Posts
    2,607
    Feedback Score
    7 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hcpookie View Post
    "roll of wire mesh" - not sure what that is?

    "liquid bandage" - same as liquid skin that is the stuff used to "glue" minor cuts?

    Also read that some of the quick-clot stuff is shellfish based, and some people like my wife with shellfish allergies could have reactions. Any options that aren't shellfish-based?
    The Wire Mesh is the stuff we used to make Rabbit cages out of. About a 1/4 inch squares of hole on the wire. Makes for a great splint, but needs padding to be effective for a longer term (more than 72 hours).

    Liquid skin and liquid bandage are the same thing, I missed that in your list.

    I do not think that the quick-clot stuff poses any danger. The stuff stays in the bandage as far as I know. An ER Nurse could tell you if they have any procedures or policies regarding this, or an EMT for that matter.



    Regards,
    Imagine whirled peas

    Peace, Love, And Superior Firepower






    Bellson

  7. #7
    GuncoHolic Sprat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,654
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)

    Default

    i Have two types of kits
    one is a range kit for trauma ( IE shootings) these are US individual medical kits, I have added a few different personal items to these, everyone in my family and extended family has these who shoots
    they are 6545-01-094-8412 they are small and compact
    Individual Military Issue Case - 679753, First Aid Safety at Sportsman's Guide

    the second kit is large
    its a surplus german army kit this comes in a large metal box each family vehicle has one of these, funny thing the bandage packages are in german & english and they are made in the US. this kit was $24
    both can be found at sportmans guide, what they lack can be pruchased at rite-aid/walgreens/ CVS
    items like cold/heat packs, water purificatipn tables, cloting packs, etc
    Cheaper than dirt has large varity of kits
    Cheaper Than Dirt - America's Ultimate Shooting Sports Discounter
    also the solider first aid manual can be obtained for $12 in there is basic first aid manual a must
    Sprat and sprat1 are one and the same.

  8. #8
    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    5,353
    Feedback Score
    20 (100%)

    Default

    For risk of some one losing an arm or leg, always mark a 'T' on the forehead of a victim in use of a tourniquet. If he passes out, he can't talk and the first responders need to know immediately.

  9. #9
    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    7,691
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)

    Default

    Good stuff! I never thought about a "range trauma" situation but now that I think about it that would be something to consider. Accidents at the range do happen - youtube is full of shining examples of that!

    I'm going to do some research on the proper uses of a tourniquet. I still don't think I have a good idea of when they are really of value other than snakebites. The snakebite situation makes use of one but as I recall the instructions indicate that it must be adjusted so blood flow is only restricted, not prevented.

    - Smelling salts!

    - Eye pads - aren't these just big round band-aids?
    Gunco Member #10

    http://pookieweb.net


    The "original" Boltcutter Rivet Squeezers:
    http://pookieweb.net/AK/rivet/boltcutters/boltcutter.htm


    Project Pink - the Pink and Blue AK-74:
    http://pookieweb.net/pink/pink.htm

  10. #10
    Grand Poobah Gunco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    17,235
    Feedback Score
    35 (100%)

    Default

    I bought several Quick-clot for my first-aid kit years ago and only recently had a need to use it on a injury with a friend. I got to tell you this stuff is crazy good thing to have.


    Rather expensive if you get the full mil spec ones but well worth it. He had a pretty bad cut was bleeding out bad... used this....he's still around and all better.

    Lots of bandaids I seem to go through a lot of those with kids and being outdoorsy type of family. E-bay or Amazon good for bulk band-aids 3 X 100per box of 3/4 x 3in for 10 bucks and they are hospital quility.

    Little surgical kits come in handy for more then just medical emergencies these are fairly cheap also on Ebay

    just some thoughts
    "Courage is being scared to death - and saddling up anyway." - The Duke

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Search tags for this page

There are currently no search engine referrals.
Click on a term to search our site for related topics.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •