M1A receiver question
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Thread: M1A receiver question

  1. #1
    Grand Poobah Gunco's Avatar
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    Default M1A receiver question

    I'm thinking about my next build which will be another M1A ( I need to catch up to Illya).

    I'm thinking a sniper version and I have a question about receivers.

    What is the difference between a standard M1A receiver and a rear lug receiver?

    Does it make a difference for the type of barrel or stability??

    Inquiring minds want to know...

    I'm thinking Fulton or LRB...pros and cons??
    "Courage is being scared to death - and saddling up anyway." - The Duke

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    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    A camp perry shooter told me the rear lug was to make it easier/stronger to bed the action.

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    U.N.C.L.E. Illya Kuryakin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunco View Post
    I'm thinking about my next build which will be another M1A ( I need to catch up to Illya).
    Geez, means I'm gonna have to start another one.

    Got an 'extra' LRB receiver and parts. Lately, I've been eyeing the Kreiger match barrel in M1A/M14 heavy pattern (stainless steel). Probably will send them my parts and pay for the fitting service for an additional $210
    M1Garand & M1A/M14



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  5. #4
    Gunco Good ole boy kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Stronger, but I wouldn't say it makes the job "easier", it adds more fitting to the process. Adding the rear lug to the receiver gives more surface area in contact with the bedding and makes for a more rigid setup. Less movement of parts and less loosening of the bedding fit due to recoil being spread out over a larger area does make it easier to achieve max accuracy though.

    Just like it sounds, a rear lugged receiver has an added lug back there to increase the surface in contact with the stock/bedding. The lug is the only real difference from a standard one, although some manufacturers may make their "Target" receivers a bit tighter on the fit versus a more "drop in" for a standard receiver. Makes no difference on bbl type or how you free float it.

    Haven't messed with M1As in years, but back in the day Fulton Armory was THE M1A shop. Haven't heard anything since to change my mind.

  6. #5
    U.N.C.L.E. Illya Kuryakin's Avatar
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    The rear lug receiver will vastly increase the lug surface between the receiver and the bedded stock. Bedding is used to keep a consistent tension on the the receiver/barrel assembly. In an unbedded rifle assembly the tension on the receiver/barrel assembly varies due to the shifting of the receiver/barrel assembly in the stock. The variation of stresses on the receiver/barrel assembly from shot to shot produces inconsistency in point of impact. Hence, most tack driver rifles are bedded. The question to be addressed really should be will the average shooter ever notice the difference due to the advantage of a rear lugged receiver in light of all the other variables that come into play with pin point accuracy shooting? For the competition shooter that shoots thousands of rounds per year the answer is most likely yes. For me, with my level shooting skill and frequency of shooting, the answer is no. In addition, it would be hard for me to justify the additional cost.

    For an example, The FN SPR rifle I have still has the standard size lug on it that it came with. Many precision shops will modify your rifle for you and add a extra large lug to it. The rifle was sent to GA Precison for a beautiful bedding job but left the lug OEM stock. When I do my job, it performs very well and I'm very happy with it. How good is good enough



    Just my $.02 worth
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    GuncoHolic Tommo's Avatar
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    For a Great M1A/M1 Garand smith:

    Ronnie Morris

    Match Service Works
    422 Maple St.
    Madison, TN 37115

    615-868-4567

    ronm@bellsouth.net

  8. #7
    Gunco Member satan's Avatar
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    Talking best M1A1 receiver

    howdy , who make the best receiver to build a M1A1??

  9. #8
    Gunco Regular allesennogwat's Avatar
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    LRB Arms makes the best receiver. Far better than the current Springfield receivers. The besides being forged and properly machined the bolt lug recesses are a bit tighter. Almost too tight but perfect for a match rifle. Rear lugs are welded to the receivers after machining. The factory lugged receivers hopefully are heat treated after welding. I have seen the lugs break from receivers. Usually ones that were welded by third parties after the receiver was completed. These days with super strong bedding lugs aren't as important to accuracy as they used to be. 20 years agp there used to "match" stock liners. These were thinner than military ones and finished slick. The newer match stocks are suppose to be bedded without stock liners. The Krieger heavy barrels are much heavier than the "medium heavy" barrels that are more common in match rifles.

    LRB Arms website

    M14 Rifle

    Besides the forging and tighter bolt lug recesses the firing pin bridge is also properly machined. I like the traditional no lug receivers with a stock liner and a lighter weight barrel.

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