sarco paper weights
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: sarco paper weights

  1. #1
    Gunco Member kern57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    32
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default sarco paper weights

    can a m14 rear be mated to a garand front reciever sections

  2. #2
    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Next door to my neighbors house in Michigan
    Posts
    3,394
    Feedback Score
    3 (100%)

    Default

    It depends on what you want to do with it. The barrel threads and timing are the same. The back area on an m1 where the rear sight sits is longer than the same spot on a m14 and the oprod channel is also different as well as the magwell area.

  3. #3
    Gunco Veteran Viper Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,686
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Hello Kern57,
    Moleman has hit on the main items of comparison. I do believe however that the op-rod guide tracks on the Garand and the M-14 are the same. What is different is the op-rod-bolt cam set up. The M-14 uses a roller bearing on the bolt but the Garand has none.

    I have considered splicing an Garand front to an M-14 rear section. The Garand front must be sufficiently long as well as modified to approximate the M-14 counter part. An adapter for the M-14 recoil spring guide rod can be made to work on the Garand front end.

    The big problem however is that of markings. You end up with a receiver marked "M-14" which is very un-cool with the gov't.

    I have seen some curious combinations over the years. There were some M-14 clones built on full length Garand receivers. They used Garand bolts altered to use a roller bearing and M-14 op-rod along with the rest of the M-14 parts. The Garand receiver was opened up for the M-14 mag and the front "legs" were removed. The Garand trigger guard was the adaptive part. Yes, it worked !! Fun stuff !!

    Bear in mind that the US M-1 and M-14 receivers are harder than frozen dog dirt. They require carbide end mills to carve on them. Grinding can also help. This is not a beginner's project.

    VD

  4. #4
    Gunco Rookie atfsux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    13
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Also bear in mind that the steel used in U.S. weapons of this era is some HARD stuff, and re-welding receiver chunks of these types requires pre-heating to avoid cracking and warping.

    What you are seeking to do CAN be done, but has only been attempted by a few, and succeeded at by even fewer. Unless you can accurately describe yourself as master welder and machinist,...do not attempt.

  5. #5
    Citizen, Patriot, Ranger bellson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
    Posts
    2,852
    Feedback Score
    7 (100%)

    Default

    All I can say is "Be Careful".

    I tried something similar back in the day before the very stringent cutting requirements. A grand total of 12 attempts and 12 abject failures.

    # 13 was better and even worked. That's because I had a real metal head do it for me.

    After 1500 rounds, I noticed a bit of flaking around the welds. I took it in, and ended up having it magnafluxed....Good move on my part. I might have had a permanent addition to my face otherwise.

    I acknowledge that it can be done. But it would be best to have a master perform the work.



    EDIT: This was just putting a Garand back together, not modifying or creating a hybrid.
    Imagine whirled peas

    Peace, Love, And Superior Firepower






    Bellson

Search tags for this page

There are currently no search engine referrals.
Click on a term to search our site for related topics.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •