Milled CETME or 91 receiver? Has anyone done it?
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    الفوضى Runaway Shortbus's Avatar
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    Default Milled CETME or 91 receiver? Has anyone done it?

    I cant help but think that a milled receiver would improve accuracy, durability, and get rid of that abominable claw mount once and for all.
    Also I've always thought that the CETME/91 would make a decent DMR platform with a milled receiver and a free float barrel.
    Yes it wont look like a CETME or a 91 anymore, it would probably look quite fugly, but battle rifles were never pretty.

    Got any ideas?
    Disclaimer -- the preceding message was a work of fiction, portrayed by actors over the age of 21.

    There are varying degrees of evil, we urge you lesser forms of filth not to push the bounds and cross over into true corruption, into our domain. But if you do, one day you will look behind you and you will see we three and on that day you will reap it. And we will send you to which ever god you wish. --The Boondock Saints

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    Gunco Member fredieusa's Avatar
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    This has been done. On an Aluminum receiver. If you were to do the same milling/forging with steel, it will be very heavy!

    By welding rails on the standard HK receiver, you can get a more rigid receiver. This you will find on the PSG1's

    The one in the green is the forged/milled Aluminum one, check out the top rail too.



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    الفوضى Runaway Shortbus's Avatar
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    +1 on the family there

    I thought the aluminum ones were cast aluminum, which were made by Century, Federal, and Hesse. All of which have horror stories about them.
    I also doubt that the aluminum ones were made out of a high quality alloy, what i am proposing is one machined out of a solid billet, the way a good AR-15 receiver is made.
    Disclaimer -- the preceding message was a work of fiction, portrayed by actors over the age of 21.

    There are varying degrees of evil, we urge you lesser forms of filth not to push the bounds and cross over into true corruption, into our domain. But if you do, one day you will look behind you and you will see we three and on that day you will reap it. And we will send you to which ever god you wish. --The Boondock Saints

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    BANNED nalioth's Avatar
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    Early on in production, Century used some cast stainless steel receivers in their Cetme/G3 line.

    These stainless receivers are considered to be the most "in spec" receivers ever used by Century on their Cetme/G3 rifles.

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    الفوضى Runaway Shortbus's Avatar
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    I assume casting was chosen because it was relatively cheap to manufacture, but castings in a firearm give me the heebie-jeebies.

    Although I cant seem to find any drawings that could function as a manufacturing print, it seems like a relatively simple milling operation, maybe one of you guys who has come across such drawings and specs would be kind enough to upload them.
    Disclaimer -- the preceding message was a work of fiction, portrayed by actors over the age of 21.

    There are varying degrees of evil, we urge you lesser forms of filth not to push the bounds and cross over into true corruption, into our domain. But if you do, one day you will look behind you and you will see we three and on that day you will reap it. And we will send you to which ever god you wish. --The Boondock Saints

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    GunLegume lim144's Avatar
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    I own a milled aluminum commercial receiver G3 clone. Rifle is extremely accurate but has one annoying feature. Because of the additional thickness of the receiver, the safety is hard to move without moving your shooting hand out of the trigger. Not a big deal, but you may want to cut out enough space for a thumb to fit in or enlarge the safety lever somehow.

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    الفوضى Runaway Shortbus's Avatar
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    >lim144
    Who makes it?
    Disclaimer -- the preceding message was a work of fiction, portrayed by actors over the age of 21.

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    BANNED nalioth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runaway Shortbus View Post
    >lim144
    Who makes it?
    Nobody does, any more.

    They had a problem with 'asploding'.

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    Gunco Good ole boy kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Dan Coonan (DCI) used to make the AL G3 receivers. The problem was the AL was softer than steel and the trunnion was only pinned and glued in place. The trunnion pulled out eventually from the battering. A milled receiver would need to be steel.

    How much of the receiver were you wanting to make? Machining the locking recesses for the rollers, essentially integrating the trunnion into the main receiver? Or just boring out a hole for the original trunnion to weld into like the original design?

    AFAIK, the only sets of engineering drawings that exist are owned by HK, they sell them to their licensees. Reverse-engineering an existing stamped receiver is about the only viable option.

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    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    Its not milled, but PBB was making or attempting a G3 build using tubing a few years ago. If he was successful you could make the tubing thicker than a standard receiver which might help some. But I think if you're one of the top shooters that could benifit from a stiffer G3 receiver, then you'd want a different action anyway. Here's the link http://www.gunco.net/forums/f151/my-...scratch-27706/

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