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Thread: 2 questions - Case Reaming and Resizing for 45 Win Mag

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Default 2 questions - Case Reaming and Resizing for 45 Win Mag

    Case reaming

    Has anyone ever done any? I just got back from spending some time with the folks, and my dad had a PILE of scrap .308 and -06 family brass with cracked necks, etc. that will be *perfect* for conversion to 45 Win Mag. There won't be any worry of confusing the stamps since these are about 1.5" overall. In fact, I think some of them are .308 x 1.5 caliber!

    There is one additional step that is called for when converting brass to 45WM, and that is to case ream (or neck ream) the brass to enlarge the inside of the case to spec.

    I am unwilling to spend the cash (over $150) for an RCBS case reamer set at this point. I have some 45 WM brass to use as a model (thanks VZ!) and I was going to make a casting of the brass and use those measurements as a start to make a reamer. There is a taper to the I.D. that I can see, so an off-the-shelf reamer won't work.

    From what I have read, the case reaming process uses a FL sizing die, that you replace the expander bell with a guide collar, and at that point you run the reamer into the chamber to ream the I.D. to spec. Sounds easy. Anyone know differently?


    Resizing.

    I am going to anneal the .06 family brass and resize.

    The challenge I face at this time is whether or not "anything" close in size to -06 family brass will work. There was a pile of .244 brass (aka 6mm Rem) that has the same base diameter, but with slightly more taper than a .30-06 round.

    Just wondering if anyone has had experience with that brass. From the latest Hornady manual, Remington "replaced" the .244 with 6mm to be more versatile, but they are basically the same thing. I think annealing will get them soft enough to resize. If not, well, I'll know really fast when they all split during the FL sizing process!

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    I use the Forster reamer. Ebay has one currently listed (that I found, may be more) and you can put together an entire .45 set for under $50 if you shop around.

    The taper you mention may or may not be an issue during reaming or neck turning, only experience will tell.

    The .244 Remington case is exactly the same as the 6mm. Remington set the twist on the .244 for light bullets, but the .243 Winchester zoomed into popularity as a deer gun with it's twist perfect for the 100 grain pills, so the niche-caliber .244 languished.

    Wanting to overcome market resistance brought by the .244 mess, they re-introduced the caliber as the 6mm, selling rifles with a heavier bullet twist rate. Never came close to the .243. I have a 788 in 6mm and it's a tack driver, awesome rifle for the $110 with scope and mount I paid in 73 or 74.

    You should try the forming without annealing first. Go in stages, .010 to .015 thousandths larger at a time. Brass is often pretty workable as is.

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Do you mean the $30 forster reamer? That would be good for case necks, but I need to ream the inside of the case. I've read you need to have a full-length sizing die to ensure the reaming is true to the case centerline. Not sure how you could use that neck trimmer?

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    No Hope For Me 1biggun's Avatar
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    why cant you just buy a reamer the correct size or a adjustable reamer in the 20-30 dollar range and inside ream your brass. I inside ream my 17-223 brass with a simple reamer when its in the case trim die. Think it came from enco. what am I missing here?. dont you just FL size your brass then inside neck ream it to fit the 45 cal bullet??? is it some odd ball size??

    I killed my first deer with a 244 remington 760 pump it was may grandmothers. the 6 mm is the identical case as mentioned above. it in many ways is better than a 243 imoa.

    Id be leary of using old brass with unknown load counts with split necks and all that, likely due for a case seperation next.

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    No Hope For Me 1biggun's Avatar
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    I am going to anneal the .06 family brass and resize.

    The challenge I face at this time is whether or not "anything" close in size to -06 family brass will work
    remember you only want to anneal the neck area. you dont anneal the area near the base. I cant under stand why you cant simply just resize 308 or 30-06 brass for this? annealing is usualy to soften the work hardend necks of fired r rounds. since you are cutting off all of the neck and a most of the case I would think you might be able to just normally size it even with fired brass. Have you tried to full length size any yet with out annealing?? I personaly would start with un fired brass to get the bugs worked out then try to use used brass. unfired brass should be pretty soft still.

    this is going to be a nice round for the AK once you guys pull off the build

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    Forster makes a reamer set for the lathe trimmer. Neck Reamer

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1biggun View Post
    why cant you just buy a reamer the correct size or a adjustable reamer in the 20-30 dollar range and inside ream your brass. I inside ream my 17-223 brass with a simple reamer when its in the case trim die. Think it came from enco. what am I missing here?
    Looking at the case diagrams, the case I.D. is tapered, and not a square cut at the base.

    Edit - Thanks for the tip - I found the "Morse Taper" reamers at Enco. Can you round the ends of these and expect them to function?

    Enco - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Machinery, Measuring Tools, Cutting Tools and Shop Supplies

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    No Hope For Me 1biggun's Avatar
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    HMM im still confused (sorry)

    why do you need to ream clear to the bottom of the case? wouldnt a straight reamer that just reams the area were the bullet is seated only, be all that is nessacry?
    seems to me you only need to ream in aproximently the first half inch or less. in fact wouldnt a step at the correct depth be advantagous to prevent the bullet from moving back under recoil? again I appologise if I am missing something here.

    Forster will custom grind a cutter for many applications for $10 give (bottom of page) give them a call. i use the same case trimmer for my stuff BTW good product on ebay used all the time.

    http://www.forsterproducts.com/Pages/trim_reamer.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1biggun View Post
    why do you need to ream clear to the bottom of the case? wouldnt a straight reamer that just reams the area were the bullet is seated only, be all that is nessacry?

    seems to me you only need to ream in aproximently the first half inch or less.


    I have read the case conversion instructions to read "ream out the case all the way down". Is that an incorrect assumption?

    That Forster product guide seems to imply "neck only" reaming. In this case, that would ream out the mouth area of the case for only the bullet, then I assume there will be a lip at the end of the 'neck' area, then a thicker case all the way down.

    The Handloader's cartridge conversion manual reads to imply "ream it completely out" reaming.


    I just made some sulfur casts of the case I.D.

    .308 Military Brass / 45 WinMag Brass = difference

    Base .386 / .400 = .014
    Mid .424 / .437 = .013
    Mouth .422 / .448 = .026

    That's quite a bit of difference when it comes to case capacity, isn't it? Based on these numbers, I think you are supposed to ream the entire thing, all the way down to the base. A picture of an RCBS reamer would confirm this. I'll bet the RCBS is long enough for the whole thing, then you just ram it down the FL die and twist it a few times to get the I.D. case capacity up the the same size as the diagrams (and my castings!) indicate.


    If the reaming is supposed to be neck-only then I'm making a big deal out of nothing, but wouldn't all that extra brass equate to a higher chamber pressure, since the space is physically smaller with a given amount of powder. Correct? Pressure spikes are my main concern.

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    I'm no expert on forming 45 Win Mag, but just like milsurp brass having a smaller case volume, a smaller case volume on your case forms means only that you use less powder than standard brass when working up loads.

    I form 7.62 Tokarev cases from .223 surplus brass. My forms hold about 10% less powder than, say, Starline brass. So, I simply load with less powder. Sure, I get slightly less velocity, but my powder stretches further

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