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Thread: Food storage/Shelf life

  1. #11
    Red Jacket Firearms's Avatar
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    I've watched canning , thats about as close as I've come to it . Think I will try the freezer thing , can't hurt . Maybe a few zip-locks full of rice , oatmeal , then just stick it on a shelf outside and see how it does .
    Will Hayden, RedJacket Firearms
    www.Redstick-Firearms.com

  2. #12
    Gunco Regular flopshot's Avatar
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    Freebore, what about simple off the shelf supplies ? say a year's worth max. i've never been able to find how long this stuff is good for. the codes on the cans are not for the consumer.
    on a side note, i once read hot dogs in a landfill lasted 10 years !!
    must have been that o'l red dye # 5. even bacteria won't eat oscar meyers

  3. #13
    GuncoHolic BigAl's Avatar
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    one good power outage and your freezer stuff will be gone...........................

  4. #14
    Gunco Regular twistedneck's Avatar
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    Last weekend i ate a full serving of hamburger helper - from 15yrs ago! it tasted a little funny, but i didn't get sick!

    Went like this, 'dood, you didn't just make that hamburger helper.. uhmm yea i did, why? It was from my old trailer, its gotta be 15yrs old" lol.

  5. #15
    Gunco Regular Rocster's Avatar
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    Here is a link to one of the 'definitive' Food storage FAQs on the internet, by Alan T. Hagan :

    http://www.survival-center.com/foodfaq/ff1-toc.htm

    It has very detailed info on what to store, how to preserve and package it for long-life , and what the safe shelf lives are for all categories of food types. Highly recommended!

  6. #16
    Gunco Regular Freebore's Avatar
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    I'm thinking, and willing to risk that canned goods are good for much longer than their advertised shelf lives. I would risk using other sealed/preserved food sources like MRE's that have passed shelf life if they don't exhibit the common signs of spoilage, like swelled cans/packaging, obvious odor or rot/discoloration. I am not an expert, and only state what I would do!! Did anyone watch the recent History Channel program on "How Things are Made", and they showed the food cannind industry, and the background history of it? I remember that it was said that a near 200 year old can of veal was fed to labratory rats with no noted ill effect. It was also noted that canned goods seem to preserve more nutritional value than what has been recently believed.
    "Remember the Alamo"!

  7. #17
    Administrator sniper69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocster
    Here is a link to one of the 'definitive' Food storage FAQs on the internet, by Alan T. Hagan :

    http://www.survival-center.com/foodfaq/ff1-toc.htm

    It has very detailed info on what to store, how to preserve and package it for long-life , and what the safe shelf lives are for all categories of food types. Highly recommended!
    Interesting website, thanks for sharing.
    "To show you how radical I am, I want carjackers dead. I want rapists dead. I want burglars dead. I want child molesters dead. I want the bad guys dead. No court case. No parole. No early release. I want 'em dead. Get a gun and when they attack you, shoot 'em."
    Ted Nugent - speaking at the NRA convention April 17, 2005

  8. #18
    Gunco Member Hawkeye Mole's Avatar
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    I have a several unopened handles of gin and at least 4 cases of beer. With rationing I think I can make it three weeks.

  9. #19
    Red Jacket Firearms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freebore
    I'm thinking, and willing to risk that canned goods are good for much longer than their advertised shelf lives. I would risk using other sealed/preserved food sources like MRE's that have passed shelf life if they don't exhibit the common signs of spoilage, like swelled cans/packaging, obvious odor or rot/discoloration. I am not an expert, and only state what I would do!! Did anyone watch the recent History Channel program on "How Things are Made", and they showed the food cannind industry, and the background history of it? I remember that it was said that a near 200 year old can of veal was fed to labratory rats with no noted ill effect. It was also noted that canned goods seem to preserve more nutritional value than what has been recently believed.
    I saw that too . I think you're right , if it looks good , smells good and tastes good , well , there you go
    Will Hayden, RedJacket Firearms
    www.Redstick-Firearms.com

  10. #20
    GuncoHolic kernelkrink's Avatar
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    For storing rice and grains in a bucket, back in the day the advice was to chuck a golf ball sized chunk of dry ice in the bottom of the bucket before you filled it. Leave the lid laying on top but don't press it down to seal it until the dry ice had evaporated, filling the bucket with carbon dioxide. Today we have oxygen absorbers that would probably work better (no condensation issues) along with a silica gel packet for any excess moisture. Plastic buckets are permeable, so storing them in the garage next to your gas cans might be a bad idea. Most of the commercial packers I've seen either use large steel cans or put a mylar bag inside their plastic buckets to address this issue.

    I visited my parents a few years back when they were renting an older house. Down in the basement some home canned green beans were sitting up on the foundation wall. Except for the rusty caps they were in good shape, vacuum was holding and the beans looked green and fresh! My Father mentioned that he had asked the owner how old they were. The owner did not know exactly, he said they were there when he had purchased the house back in 1975 and he had been afraid to move them fearing they would explode. Still there as far as I know.

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