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Thread: Canning Recipes?

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Default Canning Recipes?

    I started this to keep from hijacking the Canned Cheese thread.

    I'm starting to can vegetables this year, but I never really considered canning meats. Is there a good book or reference that has how-to stuff?

    I'd be interested in canned meats and canned fish - not sure if the process is any different.

    And for that matter, is there a canned cheese recipe?
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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    Milk products aren't generally considered home-cannable. That said, some do it.

    Treat cheese like tomatoes, and can accordingly.

    But, cheese is traditionally kept under wax and cheesecloth.

    Storing Hard Cheeses


    Hard cheeses can be stored by dipping them in melted paraffin.
    Remove any wrapping from the cheese.
    Melt the paraffin in an old pan. Dip the cheese in the melted stuff or get a paint brush and paint the paraffin on the cheese.
    Allow the paraffin to dry completely, and dip again.
    After about 4 coats of paraffin, you may add a layer of cheese cloth for extra protection.
    Continue dipping and drying until the paraffin has formed a smooth, thick, bubble free surface.
    Store cheeses that have been coated in paraffin in the coolest spot you can find, as in a cellar or unheated room.

    Cheeses that have been stored this way will last a very long time, almost indefinitely. If the paraffin ever gets a crack or blister, re-coat it with melted paraffin.
    From Canning Cheese

    That's the way my grandparents did it.

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    Gunco Member kito155's Avatar
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    I can some of my deer meat, about 30 pints or so, every year and also chicken if I get enough. For meats you need a preasure cooker/ canner. The good part is pour from the jar, heat and eat. If you get tough old buck they are always tender this way. MMMM....

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    Gunco Regular shoot-n-scoot's Avatar
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    This is great. I am getting hungry just reading.
    Keep up this thread, I find it fascinating.
    Is there a great newbie place to start for canning? A FAQ perhaps?

    John 3:16

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    Gunco Regular shoot-n-scoot's Avatar
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    thanks for the (re)post. very usefull!

    John 3:16

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    GuncoHolic BigAl's Avatar
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    Venison is easy. Make sure all the fat, etc. is trimmed. even the toughest parts of the deer are tender after canning. I always add 1 tsp of chicken bullion to mine. lasts for 6+ years if stored in a cool dark place.

    you can can chili, meat sauces, meat balls. pretty much anything.

    I've seen canning recipes for fish and even bread. i believe the bread was canned using the oven.

    tons of info on the net..

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    Gunco Member kito155's Avatar
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    For my canned venison I trim and cut into pieces, put it in the oven with worshester, salt and pepper, stirring til brown, put into jars with 1/4 tsp salt and piece of bacon and about a 1/4 of the jar with the juice from the oven. I pre cook the meat because it stays a slight red color in the jar after preasure cooking and it turns some people off (wife). I have canned chili, stew, chicken rice soup(noodles get too soggy). The recipe book that comes with the Presto?: Pressure Canner is good and I use it for reference all the time.

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links - very interesting! It seems that obtaining a pressure canner is a requirement before I try to can some smoked fish Or smoke some canned fish?

    In all seriousness, the pressure canners seem to run around $100. A question - how safe/reliable are used ones to purchase. Trying to do this on a budget...
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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    Used canners that use a weight for pressure regulation are apt to be as good as they look - that is, if the seal seals you're good to go.

    The mechanism type of pressure regulators can go out of spec. In fact, many canning guides recommend they be tested and adjusted at intervals, even when bought new. Something done at the factory, not at home.

    That said, the mechanism type are adjustable for different elevations above sea level, thus are "safer" and more flexible in use.

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