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Thread: paperwork scanned

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    TRX
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    Gunco Irregular TRX's Avatar
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    Default paperwork scanned

    I finally dug out the scanner and went through my Drawer-O-Papers. Err, some of those really need to be in the fire safe, which is... er... empty. We bought it and it's sitting in the hall closet. Must do something about that.

    Anyway, I set the scanner software to 300 DPI grayscale and scanned tax assessments, bills, and paid receipts, the titles to all the vehicles, procedure notes from hospital visits, my birth certificate, vaccination booklet (last stamped in 1970...) , copyright registrations for the books I sold, eyeglass prescriptions, my wife's living will (I need to do mine), C&R form, NFA forms, and voter registration. Came to 191Mb. The marriage license, deed to the house, and deed registration are all on legal-size paper. I'm going to take them down to the local copy shop and see if they can scan them directly to TIFF or JPEG.

    Of all the stuff I thought of as "important papers", only about 10% needed to be scanned. About 25% went into the trash can, and the rest was stuff that didn't need to be backed up - manuals for appliances, correspondence, credit card statements, etc.

    I *should* have found the paperwork on a few firearms I bought new, and I have the troubling feedling I'm missing some stuff. It'll come to me eventually, I guess.

    My wife has a huge box of papers I need to go through, lots of it is medical stuff, so it'll probably go to over 1Gb by the time I'm done. It'll still rattle around on a cheap USB key or DVD-R.

    I tried to give each image a descriptive name, like "tax - assessment 2010 real estate" or "tax - personal property 2009 paid receipt."

    This stuff really needs to be protected somehow. I'm still thinking about that. Current thought is to encrypt each file separately with PGP. That way I can keep the descriptive names and the files can be read on anything that can see an ntfs or FAT-32 formatted key. Throw a copy of par2 and QuickPAR on there and generate PAR files to repair the files if some random bits fail.

    I also have a pair of 3x5 spiral notebooks that lay by my keyboard. One has userIDs and passwords for forums, mail and usenet providers, etc. The other has MAC addresses and passwords for the routers and cable modem, logins for eBay, PayPal, one of my bank accounts, etc. That's all stuff I consider too valuable to be stored in a file on the computer, so it stays on paper. I started the notebooks... oh, 25 years ago, back when I was keeping track of logins to various BBSs. I guess there's no reason I can't key it all in to a file and encrypt it.

    Put a DVD and a thumbdrive into my offsite backup site, one in my go bag, another in my wife's, and that ought to do it.

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    Grand Poobah Gunco's Avatar
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    Encrypt with PGP. Keep your login info on multiple USB's encrypted with PGP. Plug into your computer when you need them. Update and rotate them every 6 months.

    Store your data on encrypted DVD's offsite. You'll be surpised how much stuff should be scanned and kept somewhere else in case the worst case happens.

    All my stuff is commercal grade encrypted. Beware of opensouce encryption or opensource software period. A big opensource player just found out last week that several of their contributing programmers where paid by the government to install backdoors in their software...HAHAHA don't use openSSH anytime soon.....LOL


    This thread should be read by everyone who wants to keep their personal data safe and secure!
    "Courage is being scared to death - and saddling up anyway." - The Duke

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    Googling on "openssh backdoor" gives entries dated 2008 on back. Do you have any pointers to the recent backdoor?

    With the relatively regular leaks of major player commercial software code, the only way I know of to be completely "safe" is to install known-good software and stay disconnected from the internet.
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

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    Gunco Regular Dirty Harry's Avatar
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    Default Offline.....?

    I've started looking into having a computer dedicated to function offline only. Intended for portable backups and secure storage of information. Any suggestions?
    Want to buy: Tantal Left and Right side selector parts.


    RRORC!
    I'm no sheep!

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    Grand Poobah Gunco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjohnson View Post
    Googling on "openssh backdoor" gives entries dated 2008 on back. Do you have any pointers to the recent backdoor?

    With the relatively regular leaks of major player commercial software code, the only way I know of to be completely "safe" is to install known-good software and stay disconnected from the internet.
    Sorry not openSSH I meant openBSD...check your PM
    "Courage is being scared to death - and saddling up anyway." - The Duke

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    TRX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty Harry View Post
    Any suggestions?
    Up through XP, Microsoft would still let you go through a long and tedious "registration" via their telephone system. I had to do it with 12 machines on a secure site last year... then there were the battles with the software vendors who'd sworn blue that their products didn't need internet access, and then the software wouldn't even install unless it could contact the mothership... "what part of 'no internet' do they not understand?"

    For general utility work, I use Puppy Linux 4.3.1. It boots from a liveCD or USB key. It will mount the usual Linux filesystems plus ntfs and hfs.

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    Cranky Curmudgeon zoom6zoom's Avatar
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    ^Such a copy of Puppy is also a very handy rescue tool when your Windows won't start up and you need to save some files.

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    Administrator sniper69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoom6zoom View Post
    ^Such a copy of Puppy is also a very handy rescue tool when your Windows won't start up and you need to save some files.
    I keep a copy of TRK (trinity rescue kit) on disk and also have a few other "rescue" type disks. Also in my book of disks are several live cd/dvd's of various flavors of linux. One computer is running Ubuntu (set up as a dual boot), the others have windows on them. One of my kids has a triple boot set up with xp, osx, and ubuntu (I had to help him with that, lol). It is good to have multiple ways to recover files or to be able to use various OS.

    As for scanning documents - I am looking into a fujitsu scansnap 1500 duplex scanner. I figure it would get many piles of my paperwork reduced and it will scan legal size too.

    Does anyone have any experiences with the scansnap scanners?
    "To show you how radical I am, I want carjackers dead. I want rapists dead. I want burglars dead. I want child molesters dead. I want the bad guys dead. No court case. No parole. No early release. I want 'em dead. Get a gun and when they attack you, shoot 'em."
    Ted Nugent - speaking at the NRA convention April 17, 2005

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    For working on a reluctant MS system, the ultimate boot CD is a good one to have, Ultimate Boot CD - Overview

    Don't like working from the command prompt? Try the ultimate boot cd for Windows, UBCD for Windows

    Hirens boot cd is excellent as well, Hiren's BootCD 13.0 - All in one Bootable CD www.hiren.info

    Part of my recovery, repair and security toolkit along with various Linux bootable CDs.
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    What's the question? Offline protection for DAR (Data At Rest)? That's one of the big things I do for my customers, and as the onsite MSFT employee I tend to be looked to as the resident expert.

    Offline systems can completely function with no connection to the Internet if you perform a phone-based activation. Just call in and the activation can be completed with no web connection. No worries there. There are CAC-based activation solutions that are available only to the DOD customers that have a certain support agreement with Microsoft. But nothing available on a "personal" level. So the phone-based activation is pretty much the best solution for a completely disconnected system. Or better yet, just connect long enough to activate, then presto you are done with the online connection.


    DAR needs several considerations. You can use the built-in EFS (Encrypting File System) which is certificate-based, so you don't have to deal with pass phrases. Certificate authentication is the de facto standard for data protection. There are some considerations as you must do it correctly. Do it wrong and all these so-called "exploits" can be used to access the data. The MSFT BBP (Best Business Practice) guides describe how to do it, so you can at least have the how-to data deployment. But I'm starting to ramble.


    BitLocker, another built-in tool, can protect a laptop, USB drive, etc. by whole system encryption. Again, several considerations as you must have a TPM in the BIOS (essentially a smartcard built into the motherboard). The most secure deployment of BitLocker utilizes TPM + PIN, meaning you must interact with the system at boot to get into it. The "exploits" that are on the Internet are directed against systems that do not utilize TPM + PIN, rather TPM-only implementations. Very interesting to see the exploits in action (I think on the Cambridge .edu website) which underscore the need to have a properly implemented deployment. Again, I'm starting to blather....


    Bottom line - EFS can protect data on a per-folder basis. BitLocker can protect an entire disk (intended for laptops etc). Properly implemented, both will provide a very robust data protection solution. I can talk all over the details if you need them, but the information is available on the MSFT website And before the ABM people (Anything But Microsoft) start dissing the solutions, keep in mind that a proper implemention will not suffer the effects of these so-called "exploits".
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