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Thread: First Aid Kit

  1. #1
    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Default First Aid Kit

    With the recent disaster in japan I had decided to re-evaluate my First Aid Kits. My kits are very basic but given the state of the world and here in the United States I may make several upgrades.

    First Aid Kit

    A first aid kit is a must.



    I keep a couple First Aid Kits (one at home and another in the truck).



    The kit includes various bandages, gauzes, splits, hemostats, latex gloves, anti-biotic creams, burn cream, thermometer, a stethoscope with blood pressure cuff, SAM splints, tweezers, hand sanitizer, pain meds, dextromorphin, benzocaine, lidocaine, Cipro (powder), etc. I may upgrade with an expanded trauma kit eventually as conditions change. I had a large trauma kit when I worked in Myanmar (formerly Burma)



    In a radiation emergency it is good to keep some Potassium Iodide on hand to protect against thyroid cancer from radiation. It won't protect against much else except perhaps some toxic heavy metal contamination but you never can tell when a potential radiation threat materializes. I keep two vials of Potassium Iodide solution with eye droppers (~20 mg/drop). To block thyroid gland to prevent uptake of radioactive iodine contaminating food and water, take 4 drops of a saturated solution daily. (Fill a brown dropper bottle about 60% full with crystals, then add water until bottle is 90% full. Shake. Check to be sure that some crystals remain out of solution. See Nuclear War Survival Skills p. 114.)
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


  2. #2
    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    Nice kit. Those Sam Spints are amazing. Everyone should have a couple of these in their kit. Thankfully mine has only been used once but they are reusable and should last forever.

  3. #3
    Always sore, always tired Bradrock's Avatar
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    I'm considering one of these. I'm more than 50 miles from a half assed hospital . We have no 911 here. only a daytime ambulance that goes to a larger town at night.And air evac helo also 50 miles away , if the wind is not blowing or it'snot raining.


    MHR-316 - Military STOMP Portable Hospital Black Extensive and Intensive Medic Care
    " Save a tree...........Eat A Beaver!"

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    In your situation Brad, I would be on the look out for a nice nurse at the hospital who would be willing to either back door or authorize/train you in administering an IV bag if you haven't already. By the time the emt's get to your place, you need to already have the situation completely under control. In other words, you are the first responder.
    Asherman chest seals (ACS) are also a must for a well rounded kit. Whether or not you would be shot, the chances of a punctured lung in a car or workshop accident are not to be ignored.
    Here's one of my kits minus anything that a civilian is not supposed to have , of course.
    http://www.gunco.net/forums/f259/com...rything-35321/

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    ...
    In a radiation emergency it is good to keep some Potassium Iodide on hand to protect against thyroid cancer from radiation. It won't protect against much else except perhaps some toxic heavy metal contamination but you never can tell when a potential radiation threat materializes.
    ...
    SSKI protects ONLY against radioactive iodine uptake, not against any heavy metals. Agree with all the rest, you can never have enough first aid at hand.
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    That stuff wreaks havoc on the human body, then again so does radioactive iodine. If it comes to that point I think it would be a spiritual decision moreso than a physical one. Keep it onhand and pray we won't go there.
    The START kit is nice, but you may be able to assemble a good one for less $$$. Always check the liquidators for surplus.
    Unused defibulators might start turning up cheap from all the factories and office buildings going under and auctioning the contents. You'd think your insurance co. would cover the price of one, but mine won't.

  7. #7
    Citizen, Patriot, Ranger bellson's Avatar
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    I read the posts. I am throwing in my $0.02. Apologies if it was covered, and I missed it....

    1. Tourniquets.
    2. Plastic and appropriate tape for sucking chest wounds.
    3. An IV Needle, with on /off valve to evacuate a chest cavity full of air.
    4. Plain, Jane, TAMPONS! Nothing absorbs better. They used to make huge trauma pads that did the same thing. Watch an old MASH episode or two. Sometimes you have a LARGE bleeder that is not life threatening, or a major arterial bleeder that can be controlled by direct pressure without the use of a tourniquet. Tampons do a good job of controlling those by creating a lump of cotton to bear down on the injury site. Not perfect....Used this only once. I think it made the difference.
    5. Aspirin. Antibiotics. Opiates. Enough said.
    6. The IV suggestion was a valid one. Back in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam, Medics were issued an IV bottle with preserved Plasma that they would mix in the field at need. Not perfect, but it worked. Scary thing is that they would boil it to sterilize....The tubing was issued in paper envelopes along with the needles. The Army showed us this gear back in the 80's and spent a day training us in it's use. Imagine scooping up water from a stream or pond, boiling it, and sterilizing the bottle and needle in that water. Oh, we were trained to use a compress to filter the water. Feel better now?

    Off soapbox.....

    I think that you covered most of the above, but like most posts; the reader is sometimes left to wonder....

    Apologies again if I missed anything.
    Imagine whirled peas

    Peace, Love, And Superior Firepower






    Bellson

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