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Thread: The Barter Value of Skills

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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Default The Barter Value of Skills

    The Barter Value of Skills

    Posted by truther on April 27, 2012
    Tess Pennington
    Ready Nutrition

    Recently, we talked about the necessity of learning skills to aid us in a survival situation. Don’t underestimate the value of those skills for barter. If the grid goes down, people may be left with no access to medical care, serious gaps in their knowledge or the inability to repair vital items. If you possess those abilities, your skills will be in high demand.



    In the situation of economic collapse, there will be a revival of the barter system. To barter means to exchange your goods or services for someone else’s goods or services. To complete a satisfactory barter transaction, each person must desire something from the other party. Despite the potential of desperation, it’s morally imperative to be fair to the party that is most in need. Remember that one day, that person who is most in need may be you.

    Right now, if something breaks, the replacement is only as far away as the closest Wal-Mart. However, in the event of an economic collapse or a disaster that causes the trucks to stop running, it won’t be easy to replace broken items. The ability to repair broken items will be in very high demand. It will be a rare skill, because we live in a world of planned obsolescence. Few people actually know how to repair an item in a sturdy and long-lasting way.

    Brandon Smith of Alt-Market calls this about bringing back the American Tradesman:

    “If you wish to survive after the destruction of the mainstream system that has babied us for so long,” he says, “you must be able to either make a necessary product, repair a necessary product, or teach a necessary skill. A limited few have the capital required to stockpile enough barter goods or gold and silver to live indefinitely. The American Tradesman must return in full force, not only for the sake of self preservation, but also for the sake of our heritage at large.”

    Check out Brandon’s excellent article on the barter system here.

    There is no limit to the skills that could be used in a barter situation. Some examples would be:

    First Aid for traumatic injuries
    Sutures
    Midwifery/delivering babies
    Dental care
    Herbal remedies
    Animal Husbandry
    Veterinary Skills
    Teaching children
    Teaching skills to adults like knitting, gardening, machine repair, etc.
    Mechanic’s skills: the ability to fix solar generators, small machines, automobiles, etc.
    Other repair skills: the ability to repair tools, woodstoves, plumbing, etc.
    Gardening/Farming
    Construction
    Gunsmithing/Weapon repair
    Security services
    Food Preservation
    Sewing/Mending
    Making soap and candles
    Blacksmithing

    If the grid goes down or the economy collapses in a long-term way, gone are the days of making your living doing IT work or ringing through purchases at the grocery store. You will need to become not only self-sufficient, but a provider of goods or services. Consider what abilities and knowledge you possess that can be shared with others. Nobody can do it alone – there is always going to be something you need that you can’t provide for yourself.

    The Barter Value of Skills | Pakalert Press
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Default HOW TO COMMUNICATE IF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT SHUTS DOWN THE INTERNET

    HOW TO COMMUNICATE IF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT SHUTS DOWN THE INTERNET

    Scenario: Your government is displeased with the communication going on in your location and pulls the plug on your internet access, most likely by telling the major ISPs to turn off service.

    This is what happened in Egypt Jan. 25 prompted by citizen protests, with sources estimating that the Egyptian government cut off approximately 88 percent of the country’s internet access. What do you do without internet? Step 1: Stop crying in the corner. Then start taking steps to reconnect with your network. Here’s a list of things you can do to keep the communication flowing.

    PREVENTIVE MEASURES:

    MAKE YOUR NETWORK TANGIBLE

    Print out your contact list, so your phone numbers aren’t stuck in the cloud. Some mail services like Gmail allow you to export your online contact list in formats that are more conducive to paper, such as CSV or Vcard, and offer step-by-step guides on how to do this.

    BROADCAST ON THE RADIO:

    CB Radio: Short for “Citizens Band” radio, these two-way radios allow communication over short distances on 40 channels. You can pick one up for about $20 to $50 at Radio Shack, and no license is required to operate it.

    Ham radio: To converse over these radios, also known as “amateur radios,” you have to obtain an operator’s license from the FCC. Luckily, other Wired How-To contributors have already explained exactly what you need to do to get one and use it like a pro. However, if the President declares a State of Emergency, use of the radio could be extremely restricted or prohibited.

    GMRS: The General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a licensed land-mobile FM UHF radio service in the United States available for short-distance two-way communication. It is intended for use by an adult individual who possesses a valid GMRS license, as well as his or her immediate family members… They are more expensive than the walkie talkies typically found in discount electronics stores, but are higher quality.

    Family Radio Service: The Family Radio Service (FRS) is an improved walkie talkie radio system authorized in the United States since 1996. This personal radio service uses channelized frequencies in the ultra high frequency (UHF) band. It does not suffer the interference effects found on citizens’ band (CB) at 27 MHz, or the 49 MHz band also used by cordless phones, toys, and baby monitors.

    Microbroadcasting: Microbroadcasting is the process of broadcasting a message to a relatively small audience. This is not to be confused with low-power broadcasting. In radio terms, it is the use of low-power transmitters to broadcast a radio signal over the space of a neighborhood or small town. Similarly to pirate radio, microbroadcasters generally operate without a license from the local regulation body, but sacrifice range in favor of using legal power limits.

    Packet Radio Back to the ’90s: There do exist shortwave packet-radio modems. These are also excruciatingly slow, but may get your e-mail out. Like ham radio above it requires a ham radio license because they operate on ham radio frequencies.

    TELEPHONE:

    Set up a phone tree: According to the American Association of University Women, a phone tree is “a prearranged, pyramid-shaped system for activating a group of people by telephone” that can “spread a brief message quickly and efficiently to a large number of people.” Dig out that contact list you printed out to spread the message down your pyramid of contacts.

    Enable Twitter via SMS: Though the thought of unleashing the Twitter fire hose in your text message inbox may seem horrifying, it would be better than not being able to connect to the outside world at all. The Twitter website has full instructions on how to redirect tweets to your phone.

    Call to Tweet: A small team of engineers from Twitter, Google and SayNow, a company Google acquired recently, made this idea a reality. It’s already live and anyone can tweet by simply leaving a voicemail on one of these international phone numbers (+16504194196 or +390662207294 or +97316199855) and the service will instantly tweet the message using the hashtag #egypt. No Internet connection is required. People can listen to the messages by dialing the same phone numbers or going to the Twitter account, speak2tweet.

    Alex Jones and infowars.com have a telephone number for people to listen to his radio show by phone, in case the internet goes down, or if you don’t have internet. The phone in listen line is 512-646-5000.

    FAX:

    If you need to quickly send and receive documents with lengthy or complex instructions, phone conversations may result in misunderstandings, and delivering the doc by foot would take forever. Brush the dust off that bulky old machine, establish a connection by phone first with the recipient to make sure his machine is hooked up, then fax away.

    You may not need a fax machine to send or receive faxes if your computer has a dial-up fax application.

    NON-VIRTUAL BULLETIN BOARD

    Sometimes we get so wrapped up in the virtual world that we forget about resources available in the real world. Physical bulletin boards have been used for centuries to disseminate information and don’t require electricity to function. If you are fortunate enough to be getting information from some other source why not share it with your friends and neighbors with your own bulletin board? Cork, magnetic and marker bulletin boards are as close as your nearest dime store and can be mounted just about anywhere. And if push comes to shove you can easily make your own with scrap wood lying around the house.

    Getting back onlineWhile it might be relatively easy for a government to cut connections by leveraging the major ISPs, there are some places they wouldn’t get to so readily, like privately-owned networks and independent ISPs.

    FIND THE PRIVATELY RUN ISPs

    In densely populated areas, especially in central business districts and city suburbs there are multiple home WiFi networks overlapping each other, some secure, some not. If there is no internet, open up your WiFi by removing password protection: If enough people do this it’s feasible to create a totally private WiFi service outside government control covering the CBD, and you can use applications that run Bonjour (iChat on Mac for example) to communicate with others on the open network and send and receive documents. **needs more clarification

    If you are a private ISP, it’s your time to shine. Consider allowing open access to your Wi-Fi routers to facilitate communication of people around you until the grid is back online.

    RETURN TO DIAL-UP

    According to an article in the BBC about old tech’s role in the Egyptian protests, “Dial-up modems are one of the most popular routes for Egyptians to get back online. Long lists of international numbers that connect to dial-up modems are circulating in Egypt thanks to net activists We Re-Build, Telecomix and others.”

    Dial-up can be slow. Often, there is a lightweight mobile version of a site that you can load from your desktop browser quickly despite the limitations of dial-up. Examples: mobile.twitter.com, m.facebook.com, m.gmail.com.

    AD-HOC NETWORKING

    Most wireless routers, PCs, laptops, and even some ultramobile devices like cellphones have the ability to become part of an “ad hoc” network, where different “nodes” (all of the devices on the network) share the responsibility of transmitting data with one another. These networks can become quite large, and are often very easy to set up. If used properly by a tech-savvy person, such networks can be used to host temporary websites and chat rooms. There are many internet tutorials on the internet for ad hoc networking, so feel free to google some.

    Apple computers tend to have very accessible ad hoc functionality built in, including a pre-installed chat client (iChat) that will automatically set up an ad hoc “Rendezvous” chatroom among anybody on the network, without the need for an external service like AIM or Skype. Ad hoc network-hosting functionality is built in to the Wi-Fi menu.

    Windows computers have several third-party ad hoc chat applications available (such as Trillian) and setting up an ad hoc Wi-Fi network is almost as simple as on a Mac.

    Linux operating systems, of course, have plenty of third-party apps available, and most distros have ad hoc network-creation support built in.

    BUILD LARGE BRIDGED WIRELESS NETWORK

    Using popular wireless access point devices like a Linksys WRT54G, you can create a huge wireless bridged network — effectively creating a Local Area Network (LAN), or a private Internet that can be utilized by all users within range using a Wi-Fi enabled device.

    You can also link multiple devices together wirelessly, extending the range of your network. Most access points will cover a 100 meter area and if your wireless device is built to support the 802.11n wireless standard, you will get almost a 500 meter coverage area for each access point.

    To build a wireless bridge, check out the dd-wrt wiki, and learn how to configure Linksys WRT54G as a wireless client using this Anandtech thread.

    NINTENDO DS

    A used DS family device can be purchased inexpensively. In addition to wi-fi, the DS supports its own wireless protocols. Using Pictochat, it is possible to chat with nearby DS users without having any DS games. Unfortunately, the range is quite short.

    Some games, such as the fourth generation Pokemon games, support mail items. Thus you can send your message under the guise of just playing a game. Mail items can be sent through the Internet if you can get on the net and you and your partner(s) have each other’s friend codes.

    The original DS and the DS Lite do support the Opera web browser, but finding the game card and memory pack may be very difficult. Starting with the DSi, Opera is downloadable.

    INTRANET

    Your computer has the ability to set up your own INTRANET. This was done BEFORE the internet was popularized in two ways: Your computer dialed up other computers and sent them the contents of a message board, or local people people dialed into your computer. A nationwide system can be set up this way with a central location sending to many cities then each city sending out the info locally.

    BECOME UNTRACEABLE

    If you’re going to post government secrets on your work-around site, you may want to set up an untraceable account. Really, you only need a mail drop, an assumed name, a prepaid credit card you can get at many stores to set up service.

    GET SATELLITE ACCESS

    You can have very, very slow internet if you have something similiar to an Iridium phone, which would allow you to do dial up at 2400 baud, which at least gives you e-mail. This will also work when your government has shut down GSM and telephone access, and will work pretty much anywhere on the planet. If you’re in the right place, get yourself KA-SAT access which is satellite broadband and will not be routed through any internet exchange that certain local governments may monitor or block (unless that government is part of EU or er … Uncle Sam.

    BACK TO BASICS

    Make some noise: Have an air horn or other loud instrument handy. It may just come down to being able to alert people in your local geographic area, who would otherwise be unaware of an emergency. You may also want to learn a bit about Morse code and have a cheat sheet available.

    Source

    HOW TO COMMUNICATE IF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT SHUTS DOWN THE INTERNET | Pakalert Press
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    As far as digital communications in a non-internet situation, consider becoming a HAM and using packet radio. If phone service is available, a system I used to use called FidoNet works.

    Radio relays (HAM) or phone relays work in a store and forward way. You make a request (such as a post on Gunco) and your computer stores that request until you make connection (to a HAM relay or land-line modem). The request gets forwarded to the next relay or PC. This continues until the request reaches the destination (such as Gunco) when it actually gets posted.

    Gunco stores this info and any replies, which work their way back to your PC via the same store and forward system.

    It's not fast, but is reliable and can be effective.
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    Hell, lots of folks around here use the barter system already, just the Vt way I guess. Maybe cause no one has many bucks around here,,,,, anways,,there's always a price to pay for living in a rural area.

    Around here,,, it's a beatuful area, a generally safe area and and if you want to put in the efforts you can pretty much live off the land quite easy and not really have to worry about haveing a ton of $. BUT,,, jobs are kinda a bitch to find,,and a good one even harder. I guess most rural areas are that way though.

    If you live in a metro area you have good access to jobs and income, and all the other aminities you could possibly ever want. But you have to give up all the things we enjoy around here every day, it's just not the life style for me. I'll just put up with working a bit harder and enjoy a laid back life.


    I'm just lucky that Paw and my Gramp taught me so much, it certanly has made my life easyer being able to do stuff. Just about anything.

    I know communications are a going to be a huge concern during any emergency, but if we have a SHTF senario involving nukes, any EMP waves are going to take out every transistor and chip out there, so having digital equeptment is usless any ways. Unless you had it protected, and I'm not sure how to do that,,maybe lead flashing???? Any body know?? Any systems we normally use and don't normally give a second thought to, will be down. Every thing,,,, emergency brodcast systems and all. That's when ya better damn well have some woodsmanship skills and preporations or you'll be a hurting puppy!!! Seems to me some old school tube radios may may be the only options if any EMP type attack happens. Then again,,, you may not be able to contact any one any ways, there stuff is out too, and if you do contact someone,,,, it might not be who you think it is!!!!! Remember tactics,,,, ya never know who you might be talking to on the radio in a post apocoliptic world, could be the enemy,,, GEZZZZ,,, pretty Orwellien , isn't it ???

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    Gunco Addicted for life j427x's Avatar
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    right now i am a growing tomatos , corn , pintos, swash and several other native american style crops on various truck-patches across the farm.

    right now i can't say i am too worried about interwebs, cell-phones or I=pods, nanos face-book, or "tweets".

    now if the AC goes then i'll worry---LOL!

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    GuncoHolic kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twa2471 View Post
    I know communications are a going to be a huge concern during any emergency, but if we have a SHTF senario involving nukes, any EMP waves are going to take out every transistor and chip out there, so having digital equeptment is usless any ways. Unless you had it protected, and I'm not sure how to do that,,maybe lead flashing???? Any body know?? ???
    What you need is called a "Faraday Cage", essentially a metal box with no openings to the contents. When the EMP hits metal, it induces a current in it, just like in a transformer. Only we are talking lightning bolt level current, not 12 volts. However, electricity only travels along the surface of metal, so anything on the inside of a metal box never gets hit with the current travelling over the outside.

    A simple and cheap one can be made out of a brand new metal garbage can. Simply fill it with your electrical items you want to protect, seal the lid on, and stash it somewhere. Items protected. Soldering a ground wire to it may also be helpful.

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    I knew the kernel would know,,, damn old boy,,, is there anything you don't know about,,,, you are indeed a wealth of knowlage!!! I didn't relize a "faraday cage" worked on EMP's like it does with lightning. Good info. to have. I guess I'd better store my hand held radios that way. Not that I'm really all that much of a "dooms dayer" but one never knows what will happen now days. And communications are as critical a resourse during any emergencys, just as much as any other supplys are. I found that out during Ireane. Thanks kernel.

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    Would the items need to be insulated from the sides and bottom of the cage?
    Maybe a small pallet on the bottom and a box inside made from luan and 1x so nothing can contact the inside surface of the metal?

  9. #9
    GuncoHolic kernelkrink's Avatar
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    "Only travels across the surface of the metal". The inner surface of the box never gets charged, that's why it works.

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