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Thread: Drought Takes Toll on Food and Fuel Supplies

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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Default Drought Takes Toll on Food and Fuel Supplies

    Drought worsens crop damage, raising world food, fuel worry



    Well, looks worse than people thought.

    Drought worsens crop damage, raising world food, fuel worry - Yahoo! News

    I'm just glad that we prepped for such things and don't have to worry about ourselves and our families. This is why we prep guys. It can be just about anything - crop failures, economic collapse, or any variety of disaster(s) or combination of events. We should be okay but those who didn't prep are going to be in a world of hurt should this drough go on much longer. The forecasts look grim for farmers this month and into August.

    Storage - Food and Basic Goods in Mad Max World Forum

    Survive and thrive in Mad Max World Forum

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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Iowa corn, pork producers warn of drought's impact

    Snippit:

    During a public forum hosted by Branstad, representatives of Iowa's pork, cattle, corn and soybeans industries expressed alarm about the impact of what state climatologist Harry Hillaker called the worst drought in Iowa since 1988.

    They predicted a ripple effect throughout the state as smaller-than-expected harvests cause prices to spike and create a shortage of grain products that feed livestock. Pork and beef producers will be hit particularly hard because they lack an equivalent to the crop insurance that helps protect most corn and soybean farmers, they said.

    "The drought and impact on feed prices may be on the verge of creating a financial disaster for the pork industry and other livestock industries," said Bill Tentinger, a hog farmer from Le Mars who is president of the Iowa Pork Producers Association. "Much of the media coverage has focused on crop producers who face large yield losses. However, the animal industries may ultimately fare even worse."

    Continued: Iowa corn, pork producers warn of drought's impact - Businessweek


    Drought now grips more than half of the nation

    Snippit:

    WALTONVILLE, Ill. - The nation's widest drought in decades is spreading, with more than half of the continental United States now in some stage of drought and most of the rest enduring abnormally dry conditions.

    Only in the 1930s and the 1950s has a drought covered more land, according to federal figures released Monday. So far, there's little risk of a Dust Bowl-type catastrophe, but crop losses could mount if rain doesn't come soon.

    In its monthly drought report, the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., announced that 55 percent of the country was in a moderate to extreme drought at the end of June. The parched conditions expanded last month in the West, the Great Plains and the Midwest, fueled by the 14th warmest and 10th driest June on record, the report said.

    Topsoil has turned dry while "crops, pastures and rangeland have deteriorated at a rate rarely seen in the last 18 years," the report said.

    The percentage of affected land is the largest since December 1956, when 58 percent of the country was covered by drought, and it rivals even some years in the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s, though experts point out that this year's weather has been milder than that period, and farming practices have been vastly improved since then.

    In southern Illinois, Kenny Brummer has lost 800 acres of corn that he grows to feed his 400 head of cattle and 30,000 hogs. Now he's scrambling to find hundreds of thousands of bushels of replacement feed.

    "Where am I going to get that from? You have concerns about it every morning when you wake up," said Brummer, who farms near Waltonville. "The drought is bad, but that's just half of the problem on this farm."

    Around a third of the nation's corn crop has been hurt, with some of it so badly damaged that farmers have already cut down their withered plants to feed to cattle. As of Sunday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said, 38 percent of the corn crop was in poor or very poor condition, compared with 30 percent a week earlier.

    Continued: Drought now grips more than half of the nation | StarTribune.com


    Black Blade: Looks grim.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Food Price Spikes Become Part of the Scenery

    Published: Jul 17, 2012
    By Andrew Peaple

    Rising food prices? Get used to it. This year's drought in key U.S. crop-growing regions has spurred talk of another global food crisis; the benchmark corn futures price has risen 21% this month, while wheat is up 16%. That's bad news for countries reliant on food imports, particularly developing nations. But food price volatility is becoming the norm.

    For now, corn, wheat and soybean prices are still short of highs reached during the past five years. Stock levels relative to annual global consumption of these major traded soft commodities may be tight, but they're around their average over the past decade. Because prices were already high last year, the effect on overall inflation may not be as dramatic as in other years: corn is 13% higher than a year ago, but up 90% on July 2010.

    Meanwhile, prices of other key foodstuffs like rice and cocoa remain subdued. That is important: a spike in rice prices in 2008 caused real strain in developing countries, which account for 96% of the grain's annual consumption. So far, food exporters have also refrained from protectionist measures like Russia's 2010 wheat exports ban. The decline in global freight rates has reduced food shipping costs.

    Still, the impact of the latest food price increases will be felt most keenly in poorer countries, where food can account for 10%-20% of expenditure. Take Egypt, where food totals 38% of household spending. Its reliance on wheat imports caused food inflation to rise 18.4% last year, contributing to the social unrest that stoked the "Arab Spring." Rising soybean prices will likely complicate economic policy in China, which has a 60% share of the bean's global imports.

    The worry is that changeable food prices have become the norm. Grain prices were relatively stable during the 1990s and early 2000s: The latest spike in corn prices is the fourth since 2006. With supply and demand balances tight and weather patterns increasingly unpredictable, food crisis may be destined to become a persistent feature of the economic landscape.

    Write to Andrew Peaple at andrew.peaple@dowjones.com
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    ak9
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    BB
    7/4--7/26 ish is when corn polinates @ N.A. the lack of rain will impead polination. Almost The whole nation is in a drought condition !..Corn & corn products/derivitives are our nations #`1 important crop .No corn no animal feed.Farmers of animals will be selling off meat stock b4 winter . Meats will Be Cheaper to buy till winter hits STOCK UP IN OCT> ish and then Big increase after winter..
    I 've stocked up on 300 gal. "totes" that are easy to move with a skid steer .To water my stuff I capture rain or pump from ponds But I' m watering less than 10 acres,Big farmers need the Rain
    The sad part is with the big farmers is they spend $$$$$ of dollars on seed to only watch it get wasted.And then there is the equipment cost , labor,fuel ,fertilizer,taxes etc. God bless um ,it's a hard life !
    Ak9

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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Getting worse by the hour:

    Heat wave and drought besiege already deteriorated crops | Reuters

    Black Blade: Just heard on the news some farmers in Missouri saying this one is worse and only matched by the 1930s "Dust Bowl" drought. We are getting 100F here in ND over the next couple days and high temps and dry weather going forward.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    GuncoHolic 00redZX-6R's Avatar
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    The price of beans was about $13.00 a bushell in March $16.05 a bushell right now.

    Wish I had a couple thousand bushell sitting in a bin.

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    Even here in New England we've been hit pretty good too, I don't farm it, but I get out and about around the feilds and there hurting. Corn here in some places looks just about like in Blake Blades picture, this is going to hurt some,,,, all the way around!! My berries in the back yard are tiney and dry as toast,, very very small and sour, don't think they'll ammount to anything this year. I usually am able to put up 15-20 lbs for winter, and munch on them till the cows come home besides,,not going to happen this year, they never came around , just all seed and starting to drop now. Blue Berrys on the other hand are doing great around here this year, but then there super hardy anyways, wished I had some of those in the back yard!!

    Glad I've started stocking up on some stuff lately, going to be a good call for everyone I'm thinking at this rate.

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    Worsening drought to push up food prices

    United Press International

    A worsening drought ravaging much of the nation is spoiling crops and will likely hit Americans at the supermarket, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said.

    "I get on my knees every day and I'm saying an extra prayer now," Vilsack told reporters at the White House after discussing the crisis with President Barack Obama.

    "If I had a rain prayer or rain dance I could do, I would do it," he said, calling the crisis "the most serious situation" in about 25 years.

    Vilsack said 1,336 counties -- more than a third of all 3,033 U.S. counties or county-equivalent governments -- were designated disaster areas.

    He said more than 75 percent of U.S. corn and soybean crops were in drought-affected areas and more than a third of those crops were rated poor to very poor.

    The nation may still have a bumper corn crop this year -- the third-largest corn crop in history -- because favorable weather early in the growing season encouraged planting, The New York Times said.

    But Vilsack said the drought would result in food price increases into 2013.

    Milk and cheese prices will probably rise first, followed by corn and meat, industry analysts told USA Today.

    The price of corn has increased 38 percent in recent weeks and the price of beans is up 24 percent.

    The administration has lowered the interest rate for emergency loans to farmers and is streamlining farm-assistance programs, Vilsack said.

    Congress could help by revising disaster aid programs that expired last year, Vilsack said. It could also help by providing assistance through the Local Farms, Food and Jobs Act, a bill introduced in November and intended for inclusion in the 2012 Farm Bill.

    The Farm Bill was introduced in the Democratic-controlled Senate May 24 and passed that chamber June 21. It is currently being considered in the Republican-controlled House.

    Headline Story | equities.com


    Black Blade: Forecasts don't look good. More dry hot weather for the next couple weeks. Too late to replant now anyway. We could see famine conditions as we will likely keep ours here at home rather than ship abroad to other nations dependent on US grain.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    Gunco Addicted for life j427x's Avatar
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    its bad out here i think we have had less than 1" of rain for the latter part of spring and all summer.

    i have let the row crops go. as water is getting too expensive.


    you better can your food. if you got any.

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    GuncoHolic 00redZX-6R's Avatar
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    Soybeans just hit $17.00 a bushell today at the local elevator. They pay less than the larger elevators. It is getting crazy. I need to till up the back file and plant some beans next year.

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