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Thread: A tick was eating me!

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    Gunco Regular dario541's Avatar
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    Default A tick was eating me!

    Yesterday, I was out in the boondocks looking over my intended bug out site. I decided to take a look at the natural water spring from which I intend to get the water I will need to stay alive if TSHF. My wife’s family came to this area in1927. This spring has always had water. And, water is a necessity for life, and, it is too heavy to carry much of it at a time. So, I figure that I will have to hunker down somewhere close to water. Anyhow, I checked it out; everything was OK; and I returned to where my wife was waiting. And, we enjoyed the rest of the day just being out in the mountains.
    When I got home, I removed my dirty clothing and tossed them in the wash. I felt a slight itch on my side toward the front I looked down and-YUK-a tick! It was boring away on me! I carefully removed it by turning it (they kinda screw their way in and out) and dropped it into the sink, turned on the water and flushed it away.
    Today the spot is a little sore, but it seems to be healing up. This isn’t the first time that a tick has latched onto me so, I think I will be OK. I did disinfect it and put a cover over it after removing the varmint.
    But, it did remind me that, if we head out to the boondocks to live, we will have to be on constant alert against this problem. Some ticks are carrying dangerous diseases such as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. In a TEOTWAWKI situation, that could ruin your whole day! So, we will have to be diligent in checking for ticks on each other.
    I got to wondering if there is anything that can be done to prevent and/or control ticks There are some products that you can apply to your body that are supposed to repel ticks. But, how long would they last in a time of Armageddon? So, I googled “Ticks” and found some information.
    “Apply insect repellant and use the brands designed to repel ticks. Follow label instructions. Avoid use of DEET-containing repellents on children. Carefully follow instructions and apply some repellents directly to skin and others to clothing. DEET-containing repellents with concentrations of 15% or less may be suitable for children. These should be carefully applied strictly following label directions. Repellents containing permethrins may be applied to clothing but not to skin. In areas that have a high tick population, DEET-containing repellents may need to be reapplied more frequently than for repelling mosquitoes. Follow the package label instructions carefully.”
    One natural form of control that is recommended for ticks is the guineafowl, a bird species that consumes mass quantities of ticks. Just two birds can clear 2 acres (8,100 m2) in a single year! Guineas are also good “watchdogs!” Let a stranger come around and they will let the whole world know. They do lay eggs. They are easy to raise and care for. They like to roost high in trees, so, you wouldn’t have to build a coop for them. I think that they will fit right into my plans. I want to have chickens, so, I’ll get a few guineas, too.
    Years ago I was working on a ranch. WE started as soon as it was light enough to see. The mosquitoes just feasted on us. I started eating a clove of garlic every day to ward off colds (it works for me). I soon found out that the skeeters weren’t biting me nearly as much as the others. I guess they don’t like garlic in their blood. Once I neglected to take garlic for a few days and, suddenly, the mosquitoes started feasting on me again! So, as long as I worked there I ate a clove of garlic every day! The reason I even mention this right now is wondering if it would work against ticks? I believe that I will plant and cultivate garlic at my bug out spot. I know it helps other health issues.
    Any other ideas?

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    When I used to patrol the Appellation Trail I used Dr Brommers Peppermint Castile soap and it kept them away,, 99% of the time,maybe only had 2-3 on me in the 12 years so I'm guessing it works pretty well. Peppermint is a natural insect repellent I gather. I used to put a small smear around the brim of my cap and it keeps all but the most determined skeeter and deer fly away too.

    That is one of the things that was always in my pack,, it's 100% all natural and non toxic towards the environment ,too and last forever sense it very concentrated plus you get super suds even in the hardest of water . The label is kind of a hoot to read too,, it reads like some snake oil salesmen's pitch,,,,but it sure does work, a must have for sure. It gives your body a good tingle when you shower or bath with it too ,, bad part though,,,,,,,,



    YOUR ALWAYS WANTING TO EAT A THIN MINT,,,,DOWWWWW!!!!

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    Gunco Member scottbly257's Avatar
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    A flee and tick dog collar put it around one of your boots it keeps flees, ticks, and chiggers away.
    “Come on you apes, do you want to live forever?”
    attributed to an “unknown platoon sergeant”.

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    Gunco Regular Rikoshay's Avatar
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    Chiggers are the worst!!! They are definitely the silent assasins!

    I had no idea until I moved to Texas and spent some time at Ft. Hood. The mosiquitoes down there are massive.

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    Gunco Regular dario541's Avatar
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    Thanks, everybody, for your assistance. I just know that if anybody spends much time in the woods they are going to get acquainted with ticks. I will keep your posts for future use.

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    The dog collar thing does work but there very toxic and I've been told by avid hikers they will really burn your skin BAD,, Make sure not to let them rest on bare skin I gather is the word to the wise from those that know first hand. I can't say for sure, just what I've been told.

    I'll stick to Dr Brommers and mosquito head nets thanks,, I like non toxic tactics myself. Most of those pesky critters don't get after me much any how, I've been told Native Americans don't seem to be bothered buy biting insects as much as you ,,,,,HONKEYS do!!

    I'm just sticking to the fact I'm meaner than them,,,that's why they stay away from me ,,,,,"Kimosabie"

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    Gunco Regular dario541's Avatar
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    Hey, Twa; Did you hear that the Lone Ranger shot Tonto for calling him "Kemo Sabe?" He finally found out that it meant "Chicken Manure!"

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    My 3rd Great Grandma used to call white folks something too, can't remember what it was though, I don't speak Abanaki. But I'm pretty sure it wasn't good!!!!
    She was 106 when she died and I was only 6 at that time,,,in 1956. She held a grudge till her dying day cause our ancestors land was taken in the NH land grants back in the colonial days for gardens to feed the shoulders at Ft Ti and Mt Independence.

    I still find stone and clay pottery shards, and artifacts there to this day along East Creek when that field is plowed. Along with traces of a foundation of a long house which is right where she said it would be. It is on the back side of Mount Independence, across from Ft Ticonderoga.
    From the oral family stories, it seems we can trace our family back to about the mid 14 hundreds to that sight. One of my Great Grand fathers, her great grand father,, was also a guide for Eathen Allen and early French settlers in the Champlain Valley, he's mentioned in a document from the fort that's on display there. I'm still looking for one other sight she talked about.

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    Gunco Regular dario541's Avatar
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    I used to live in the Four Corners region of Colorado. Around there, you could always find old pieces of pottery, arrow and spear heads left by long ago by Native Americans. There are also lots of old ruins that are not in government parks (Mesa Verde, for example). I enjoyed traveling around the area and finding old Indian relics. I suppose that it is still possible, but, since the Libtards and Wetbacks have took over the State, I swear that I will never live there again. Probably won't even visit it.

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    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    Archaeology was my major in collage and looking around is still one of my major hobbies, I have a Huge collection. I still do allot of volunteer work with the state Historical soc, and several collages on digs,, when my old bones aren't beating me down!! This has been a passion of mine for >45 years.

    I'd been in that 4 corners region years ago in my travels and had found some good spots. Unfortunately it was while fighting fires with the Forest Service, and it was on National Forest land so picking anything up was a NO-NO. Some spots go WAY BACK,and I even have a couple pieces that go back to before the last ice age from around here. It's amassing they ever survived over 14k years,, and the ice age besides!! It's pretty mind boggling IMO. Sights with pottery generally don't date to much before 800AD though, but generally have been inhabited for eons before that once you get into the lower strata. You can tell by the style of the points the age of a sight.

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