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Thread: Bee colony collapse viruses spreading to bumblebees

  1. #11
    Gunco Regular SouthTexasGuy's Avatar
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    I think that is Wench Stalker. The last winch I fondled was hauling a truck out of a ditch.

    Hey I ain't no spelling Nazi, I'm just looking out for you. God forbid you pay a lot of money for a Chinese or Russian Wench and up shows a box with some cable and a mechanical thingee for lifting heavy weight.
    Last edited by SouthTexasGuy; 02-22-2014 at 04:55 PM. Reason: left out the smile

  2. #12
    Gunco Regular SouthTexasGuy's Avatar
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    Stalker,

    I don't want you to run into this situation.

    I thought I was ordering this...http://www.russianbrides.com/Pages/S...FZLm7AodN3sAhg

    But I received this...http://www.harborfreight.com/9000-lb...8143-8039.html

    Just saying.

  3. #13
    Gunco Veteran stalker1's Avatar
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    South Texas my eyes exploded! LOL! Guess I was thinking bout one while dealing with the other!been doing more winching than wenching since the snow.glad to see somebody got my sense of humor.

  4. #14
    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Honeybee Population Collapse Due to Insecticides, Scientists Say

    Another mystery has been solved: recent honeybee population collapses are due to insecticides, according to a team of Harvard researchers. The mysterious decline of honeybees over the past several years has been blamed on everything from cell phone radiation to global warming, but the scientists now believe they have evidence that the collapse can be blamed primarily on two widely used insecticides. The study, out of Harvard’s School of Public Health, was published in the Bulletin of Insectology this week.

    The recent dramatic decline of honeybee populations is largely due to a phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder, in which bees abandon their hives in the winter and eventually die. The researchers followed 18 colonies in Massachusetts, monitoring them for population levels and exposure to insecticides. What they found is an indictment of modern agricultural practices: the populations with the worst outcomes were exposed to two kinds of neonicotinoid, a kind of insecticide, during an especially harsh winter. According to the paper, this is because the cold weather triggers a neurological response in bees exposed to the insecticide:

    It is striking and perplexing to observe the empty neonicotinoid-treated colonies because honey bees normally do not abandon their hives during the winter. This observation may suggest the impairment of honey bee neurological functions, specifically memory, cognition, or behaviour, as the results from the chronic sub-lethal neonicotinoid exposure.
    The findings could have big implications for industry: the European Union last year banned three kinds of neonicotinoid for a two-year trial, and the Harvard scientists’ findings may lead to more of the same. With increasing weather extremes and more need than ever to grow and pollinate healthy crops, the study spreads much further than just the honey industry. “Hopefully,” the study’s authors say of the findings, “we can reverse the continuing trend of honey bee loss.”

    Bustle


    Black Blade: So now the cause is known and insecticide companies are to blame.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


  5. #15
    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    It's been a big issue around her with all the apple orchards in this area. This is not good and I'll bet they'll find some pesticide issue like DTD causing issues with the Peregrines and Eagles eggs that happened several years ago. That damn near, and did wipe out some of those those populations for years.

    I got in on a Peregrine restocking program back in the early 80's while in the Forest Service doing volunteer work, and there is now a strong population of them around now. As well as Eagles, which one of my sisters was in on a restocking program, and there coming back now pretty well. There's actually 2-3 Eagle nests close by here that I see Eagles in whenever I'm out in the boat,,it's close to one of my favorite fishing areas, and I see them every trip out now. Nice!!!

    Last year there was 4 youngsters in one particular nest and they all wintered well and I see them all together every trip. They should be out on there own here soon, so hopefully they'll be more new nests around soon.

  6. #16
    Gunco Regular akblue's Avatar
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    Started 7 or 8 years ago here. Seems to have improved just in seat of the pants observations of random bee population. I do not raise them or anything.
    seems a potential of multiple causes or a cyclical decline.

    The Plight of the Honeybee

  7. #17
    Gunco Regular Pryotex's Avatar
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    The problem with the Harvard People is in the "Hive collapse" that I have seen in NY there ARE NO DEAD BEES. If it was poisoning the bees we would have seen a larger number of dead bees at the hives. (Like a mite infestation) the bees are just gone.
    Pryotex is TEC Tactical, A Licensed 07/SOT

  8. #18
    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    I'd heard that about the hives too pyrotex,,something may be effecting there sense of direction and there dying off outside the hive,,,

    Hopefully they'll figure this out soon, it will effect every plant that depends on being pollinated by bees. It could be bad for all animals,,us included! Who ta Hell knows,,,this could very well be what kills us all off in the end,,Who Knows???

    Gezzzz,,always something to worry about!!

    Just Kidding,,what happens,, happens and we just got to work around it.

  9. #19
    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    US honeybee population suffers ‘unsustainable’ death rate over the winter



    rt.com / May 16, 2014

    Nearly one quarter of the US honeybee population died over the winter, according to an annual survey. Beekeepers report the losses remain higher than they consider sustainable, and the death rate could soon affect the country’s food supply.

    “More than three-fourths of the world’s flowering plants rely on pollinators, such as bees, to reproduce, meaning pollinators help produce one out of every three bites of food Americans eat,” the US Department of Agriculture said in a statement about the survey. Bees’ pollinating role adds $15 billion to the value of U.S. crops, including apples, almonds, watermelons and beans, according to government reports.

    The study, produced by a partnership between the USDA, the Apiary Inspectors of America and the Bee Informed Partnership, found that 23.2 percent of honeybee colonies died over the winter, which is higher than the “acceptable winter mortality rate” of 18.9 percent.

    READ MORE
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


  10. #20
    Gunco Veteran stalker1's Avatar
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    The last couple years my dad had hives I swear I thought he had hybrid bees from african strains.am I wrong? I could very well be it's been a long time.

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