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Thread: Make your own fire starter material.

  1. #11
    Gunco Veteran stalker1's Avatar
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    Sprat I admit I cheat.I buy magnesium starters every time I see em.not so much with bic lighters I guess they remind me when I smoked tobacco.haven't done the char cloth yet.we threw a magnesium deck from an old lawnmower on a bonfire once and oh how cool was that! Didn't have a clue what it was.young and dumb I guess. Glad there was 3ft snow on the ground. ..

  2. #12
    Gunco Veteran hunter_02's Avatar
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    There is a reason God invented steel wool and Bic lighters. I have several(many)spent (that means 'fired' for you government workers) 12ga magnum shotgun shells with a mini Bic lighter and a wad of steel wool(NOT Brillo)tucked inside. Yes, steel does burn.
    Hunter
    However, I think I'll get one of those wood and piston fire starters just for the kewl factor. Mongo like wood.

  3. #13
    White Cracker 4thIDvet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter_02 View Post
    There is a reason God invented steel wool and Bic lighters. I have several(many)spent (that means 'fired' for you government workers) 12ga magnum shotgun shells with a mini Bic lighter and a wad of steel wool(NOT Brillo)tucked inside. Yes, steel does burn.
    Hunter
    However, I think I'll get one of those wood and piston fire starters just for the kewl factor. Mongo like wood.
    Not only does steel burn, it will also explode. See those shavings of steel wool under your project your working on? Not suggesting this, but if someone was to place them in a sealed container with a fuse. Whoops get back, Kabooooom.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Make your own fire starter material.-mongo-003.jpg  

    "Man needs but two things to survive alone in the woods. A blow up female doll and his trusty old AK-47" - Thomas Jefferson 1781


  4. #14
    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    I always keep several Bic lighters because they come in handy for my work so I usually have a lighter around when traveling. I have done flint and steel years ago and never was successful at rubbing sticks together. I have a few magnesium sticks tucked away as well. The piston fire starter looks like it could be another interesting addition to my inventory. I know some have used them without char cloth and some use tightly wound string coated with oil or grease instead of a rubber gasket. Bic lighters are easy but good for this old dog to learn a few new tricks.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


  5. #15
    GuncoHolic twa2471's Avatar
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    I'm amassed you guys hadn't heard of fire pistons before, I've been using those sense I was a itty bitty Boy Scout !! Flint and steel too. I keep about 3-4 , 6 packs of Bic lighters in my emergency supplies though and the flint & steel kit as well as a home made fire piston. It's really amassing BB hadn't used them before, I thought he knew all the tricks sense he's a wealth of knowledge in so many other areas of preparedness, and that one is just about as old as any of the fire starting tricks out there.

    There was an additional link in the pop-ups when you go to that link that was put up here, that shows a gal making a fire piston out of a copper pipe and a dowel & 0-ring, mine I just used a cap on mine instead of a domed air gap thingy. That's the same one I'd built years back but with the addition of a aluminum "cup" on the end of the rod for the char cloth to sit in,,it works great. I usually use birch bark crumbs in mine though and that will flare up real quick and get a fire going in no time.

    There's so many old timer tricks out there that have been used for hundreds of years that still work just as well today as they did a hundred years ago or more. I've seen many of the fire pistons used on the AT when I was there and they seem to be a go-to for many of the AT hikers I've run into over the years. They work at any altitude and under most any circumstance, rain or not. A great tool to have, plus the Grand kids just love it when you make "magic fire" with no matches or a lighter.

    Glad to see some of the old ways being resurrected in these forums, some of the "old ways" are still good knowledge for anyone to have in there memory banks,,and they just plain work and are very simple tools to have and build. I'd never really though about posting on those before sense I thought fire pistons were pretty much common knowledge and I'd seen them around for so long.

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