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Thread: M4 Stock Help

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    Gunco Member frontiersman's Avatar
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    Default M4 Stock Help

    Hi all, I am finishing up an M4 build and I have a question about the stock. I am installing the 6 position M4 type stock. My question is do you need to use any type of thread lock or anti seize on the buffer tube threads, and/or on the buffer nut that holds the stock in place? Thanks in advance!

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    I didn't put any on the end of the tube, just a little on the locking nut and then tightened it down with the spanner wrench. . I am interested to know if people use it on the theads of the tube. I was afraid to because I didn't want removal to be a problem.

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    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
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    At first I didn't use anything, but the nut loosened after a while, then I put a little thread lock on for the nut. I feel the same as Tanvil and worry about it on the threads in the receiver, if you want to put some on the end of the tube I'd use the lightest thread lock they make (like for machine screws), this way you know it will break loss with little effort.

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    Gunsmith Fritz's Avatar
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    Gentlemen, I have your answer.

    Yesterday, I concluded a three day course at the Colorado School of Trades. A representative from Colt came in to the school to teach their M-16 factory armorers course. And as of a little over twenty four hours ago, I am a Colt factory certified armorer. (Sorry boys, I had to tell somebody who can appreciate it.)

    The answer to your question, straight from the horses mouth is this:

    The receiver extension nut (the castle nut), after being torqued on to the receiver and receiver end plate, is held in place by staking the receiver end plate into the recesses of the receiver extension nut with a staking tool and hammer (usually in two places, three if possible). The staking tool looks like a small chisel tipped punch. Staking the nut in place prevents the backing off of the nut, and loosening of the stock. to top it off, it in no way interferes with the receiver.

    If you dont know what staking is, look at the top of your bolt carrier. The bolt carrier key screws should be staked in from the factory. It is the strategic punching of metal to semi-permanently prevent movement, and is highly effective.
    Last edited by Fritz; 09-28-2007 at 01:55 AM.

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    Gunco Member gunbug's Avatar
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    Congrats!

    Staking is indeed the "correct" armorer's method. However, locktite is preferred by many do it yourselfers. I only put it on the nut and only the lightweight stuff--its not a load bearing surface, you're only preventing vibration walkout (my theory anyhow).

    I wish I shot enough (and on FA!) for it to be a problem for me.

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    Gunco Regular yarro's Avatar
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    Someone sells nuts that are ahalf the thickness. I put two on my M-forgery with a little locktight and they have not worked loose. I can't remember who made them as I bought them at a gunshow.

    -Yarro

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    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
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    And as of a little over twenty four hours ago, I am a Colt factory certified armorer. (Sorry boys, I had to tell somebody who can appreciate it.)
    Congrats.
    No need to be sorry, and I do appreciate it.
    Someone else told me about staking it too, but I didn't want to do it at the time so I used the thread lock, I think I'll stop being anal and do it the next time I take it apart.

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    Gunco Good ole boy tanvil's Avatar
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    Well congrats Fritz, that is awesome. How about the buffer tube treads on a standard A2? I had one that the stock screw was tighter than the the tube. When I tried to back the screw out, the whole buffer tube turned. I had to remove it as one piece and then remove the screw from the stock with a vise and and impact screwdriver. Very tricky operation indeed.

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    Administrator sniper69's Avatar
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    I didn't stake mine (though that sounds like a good thing). I just used the tool to tighten it down.
    "To show you how radical I am, I want carjackers dead. I want rapists dead. I want burglars dead. I want child molesters dead. I want the bad guys dead. No court case. No parole. No early release. I want 'em dead. Get a gun and when they attack you, shoot 'em."
    Ted Nugent - speaking at the NRA convention April 17, 2005

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    Gunsmith Fritz's Avatar
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    As Far as the A2 buttstock assembly is concerned, it should be held solid in place by the tension of tightening the upper buttstock screw on the tube. Tanvil, your screw being on there that tight isn't typical, but isn't totally incorrect either.

    I learned a whole lot more about the M4 than the A2, but the truth is, Colt doesn't manufacture the M-16 rifle anymore, and the fixed stocks weren't was hardly even covered in the class. FN is making all the M-16a4 rifles for the military now, and everything that colt is making for the military and law enforcement markets are carbines with sliding stocks. It was these new ones they were drilling into our heads.

    On a side note, as I know it is the major complaint about the M-16 series and has come up on this forum multiple times; Colt is going to be introducing a piston driven M4 carbine shortly. They are not discontinuing the "direct gas" line of carbines however, just adding to it. I am not sure whether or not this is going to be like the HK-416, or a whole different creature. But the fact is, its on its way.

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