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Thread: Lost wax casting?

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    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    Default Lost wax casting?

    Has anyone here ever tried lost wax casting? I wonder how close to a completed ar15 lower you could get by doing it. I've often wondered if it could be done and only need minimal machining afterwords. What are your thoughts.

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    Gunco Regular Shadow Walker's Avatar
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    Ruger uses lost wax casting, and they do little machining after casting a part.

    I would think you could make an AR-15 receiver aluminum casting using the lost wax process with little difficulty.

    Now..........how do you heat treat an aluminum casting??

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    GuncoHolic kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Walker View Post

    Now..........how do you heat treat an aluminum casting??
    You don't, you hard coat anodize it.

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    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    Don't know about heat treating. I knew about ruger and I remember seeing an article about their lost wax casting back in the late 80's or early 90's in guns and ammo I think. It seems like its feasable but I know nothing about casting other than bullets!I suppose you'd have to machine the threads and pin holes, but I think you'd be able to get the other openings pretty close and maybe even spot the pin holes. Hopefully some one here has actually done lost wax casting and can give some insight.

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    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    Here's a guy casting silver using this method.BP0106 Lost Wax Casting

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    Administrator pirate56's Avatar
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    I think it would be to porus and fragile. also it would be a lot of work making the wax forms to compensate for shrinkage.

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    Gunco Regular Shadow Walker's Avatar
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    Every thing looked good, except the part where it can kill you. I think I would go with a ceramic mold for an AR receiver. It don't kill you if you screw up.

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    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pirate56 View Post
    I think it would be to porus and fragile. also it would be a lot of work making the wax forms to compensate for shrinkage.
    I was wondering about how much it would actually shrink and how strong it would be. I know the cast receivers in general are weaker than a forged or machined receiver, but didn't know how much weaker they would be and if they would be usable.

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    Gunco Veteran Markp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moleman View Post
    I was wondering about how much it would actually shrink and how strong it would be. I know the cast receivers in general are weaker than a forged or machined receiver, but didn't know how much weaker they would be and if they would be usable.
    Spend the money on a good forging. They are much stronger, while the strength may be unnecessary, I think that it does the gun justice.

    Mark

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    Gunco Veteran Lt762x39's Avatar
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    I used to work in a die cast shop (maintenance electrician) they age aluminum at 400 F for 4 hours to normalize it. I also worked in an exstrusion shop they did the same thing. I am not a metalurgist but it must be an important step..... hope this helps. You might try Lindsey publications. (Google will give you the site) they have books on eveything......
    Last edited by Lt762x39; 12-09-2008 at 10:31 PM. Reason: spelling

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