Page 16 of 29 FirstFirst ... 6 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 26 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 282

Thread: A Reminder of Why You Can't and Don't Want to Convert Your AK to full Auto.

  1. #151
    Gunco Rookie egs89's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Nice post! I agree that converting your semi-automatic weapon to an illegal full-automatic weapon is not worth prison time; however I think some of your facts are a bit off. For one thing the difference between a military receiver and the one that you get with your semi-auto is a few parts and holes. But the details really aren’t important here, it’s not going to jail that’s important!

  2. #152
    "bitter" gun owner Furious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    9
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by F-Troop View Post
    I had a chance to fire a friends Ruger AC556 (the FA Mini14). On three round bursts, with 5.56mm ammo I was on with the first round only.

    Real - legal - FA is now out of sight for this boy. The cheapest, most common FA guns range upward from $3500 now. The ammo costs really add up.

    I'll take semi-auto with the occasional bump fire.

    I only wish the range nazis would let me shoot something other than a black circle.

    An old Volkswagen or TV would be nice.
    Thats why I love where I live. I can shoot at unconventional targets...safe ones that is. When I was at Ft Sill we got to shoot at several cars during Convoy Live Fire exercise.


    This is a great thread by the way. Me and a guy in my platoon were talking to a few younger soldiers just two days ago about this exact same subject. One of the guys says "cant you just file down the firing pin to make it full auto?" well, after we got through laughing we explained why that wouldnt work and then we explained how much a real, legal full auto would cost and why they cost so much.
    Id spend $5000 or so to be legal anyday.

  3. #153
    Gunco Member Emily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    108
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    My understanding is that in the United States of America it used to be legal to buy a Thompson Sub-Machine Gun through the United States Postal service and you didn't need to go through a background check or pay a tax or get a permit for it.

    I think it should be perfectly legal for people to own fully automatic weapons, but since it isn't and since prison is such a crummy place to be for such a long time, I have zero interest in breaking that law.

    I was on YouTube.com and I noticed all of the *Bump* videos. It is really amazing what some guys can do with a semi-automatic weapon but I don't think it is going to take very long for the anti-gun people to begin using those videos as a way to take our guns away from us.

  4. #154
    No Hope For Me Coils's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    PA Where the Amish Roam Free
    Posts
    14,039
    Feedback Score
    38 (100%)

    Default

    I don't know about full autos but yes you use to be able to buy firearms and have them mailed to the house without registering them. The $200 tax stamp has been around since the '20s or '30s though, so I believe full autos were registered back then.
    You can still buy full autos but they have to be manufactured (the receivers) before a certain date (don't remember it) in 1986, that's way they're so expensive now, the last ones the public can still buy were made just over 30 years ago.

    And yes I believe that our constitutional rights are being violated by restricting use from buying certain full autos.

  5. #155
    White Cracker 4thIDvet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Swamp Florida
    Posts
    12,425
    Feedback Score
    17 (100%)

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Emily View Post
    My understanding is that in the United States of America it used to be legal to buy a Thompson Sub-Machine Gun through the United States Postal service and you didn't need to go through a background check or pay a tax or get a permit for it.

    I think it should be perfectly legal for people to own fully automatic weapons, but since it isn't and since prison is such a crummy place to be for such a long time, I have zero interest in breaking that law.

    I was on YouTube.com and I noticed all of the *Bump* videos. It is really amazing what some guys can do with a semi-automatic weapon but I don't think it is going to take very long for the anti-gun people to begin using those videos as a way to take our guns away from us.
    I don't think so. As bump fire is perfectly legal. The antis just got a good slap in the face with the Heller decision. Wasn't that great. I laughed my butt off and had a couple of extra beers to celebrate. Cause the anti's are just a bunch of jerks.
    They will be the first one coming to us gun owners asking for help when or if trouble breaks out.
    How are you making out with your build? Can you show me pictures?
    National Guard. God Bless you and thanks for serving.
    There are a lot of great people here on this site. Lot of Vets too. Who did you serve with. Did you go to Iraq? I'm sure there is someone here that will know your unit. Welcome to Gunco.
    "Man needs but two things to survive alone in the woods. A blow up female doll and his trusty old AK-47" - Thomas Jefferson 1781


  6. #156
    Gunco Rookie ogjkillah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Yes you can convert a semi auto to a full auto. If you have all the right parts it is not hard to modify one. I'm not saying I've done this or condone it, but the facts are clear.

  7. #157
    Gunco Member oldpaint0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    131
    Feedback Score
    4 (100%)

    Default

    Yes and you too also get to cover and then fight for your life with well placed fire.

  8. #158
    Gunco Veteran gunnysmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wyo
    Posts
    1,542
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default

    Good reading on the origin of the NFA 1934

    1934 NFA HEARINGS

    I believe if the NFA were challenged under expost facto and shall not be in fringed,It would not stand scrutiny.
    Section 9 - Limits on Congress
    No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
    Constitution Or Bust
    Ron Paul 2012

  9. #159
    Gunco Regular ACMcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    900
    Feedback Score
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gunnysmith View Post
    Good reading on the origin of the NFA 1934

    1934 NFA HEARINGS

    I believe if the NFA were challenged under expost facto and shall not be in fringed,It would not stand scrutiny.
    Section 9 - Limits on Congress
    No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.
    An ex post facto law is one that attempts to make an act that has already taken place illegal. For example, if Congress passed a law that outlawed homebuilding a rifle and purported to say that those who built a rifle prior to the day the law was passed were criminals, that would be an ex post facto law.
    As for a legal challenge to the NFA, it was ruled constitutional about 1939. I think the name of the case was US v Miller.
    The Heller case had some specific language about "reasonable restrictions" on firearms but those were not set out.

  10. #160
    Gunco Veteran gunnysmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wyo
    Posts
    1,542
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)

    Default

    Exactly:
    Machineguns were purchased without restriction prior to the NFA.
    Those who owned such weapons, became criminals if they were not registered after the act became effective.

    Miller specific was a sawed off shotgun, concerning interstate transport, not interstate sale. It was not just the value of the shotgun in war that was questioned, but also the value of the short barreled shotgun.

    Shotguns used by military, police, and other government agencies are exempted from regulation under the National Firearms Act of 1934, and often have barrels as short as 30 to 36 cm (12 to 14 inches), so that they are easier to handle in confined spaces. Non-prohibited private citizens may own short-barreled shotguns by purchasing a $200 tax stamp from the Federal government and passing an extensive background check (state and local laws may be more restrictive). Defensive shotguns sometimes have no buttstock or will have a folding stock to reduce overall length even more when required.


    Miller was decided with out the facts The model 97 Winchester was used in the trench warfare of WWI, prior to the Miller decision.
    Miller was flawed in law and knowledge it was a political decision.
    Constitution Or Bust
    Ron Paul 2012

Page 16 of 29 FirstFirst ... 6 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 26 ... LastLast

Search tags for this page

There are currently no search engine referrals.
Click on a term to search our site for related topics.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •