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Thread: Flat vs. Blank - How do you build an AK?

  1. #1
    Gunco Regular GRIMACE's Avatar
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    Default Flat vs. Blank - How do you build an AK?

    For someone that has no easy access to a press or jig, and has little to no expirence gunsmithing, what is the easiest of the two to build on? I figured i would get the majority done my slef, and have a gunsmith headspace it for me.

    Can a flat be (properly) bent without a jig? I have a table mounted vice.

    What else do i need? (Rails, screw set*, cross bar , etc?)

    I will probably be using a stamped romanian AK kit. Whole rifle that was simply torch cut.

    *easier then rivets i assume?

    Can anyone post a real basic breakdown of what is involed for a build?

    Much thanks. -Grim

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    BANNED jpglee1's Avatar
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    I would suggest for doing ONE build that you use a bent metal blank. It is simply a matter of drilling some holes and cutting out the rest w/a dremel. You dont need to have a gunsmith headspace it for you, it is pretty simple if you have access to a press. IF NOT then I suppose its OK to have them do it.
    The only way to "properly" bend a flat is to use some kind of a brake or at the bare minimum some parallel steel stock to clamp the flat into and provide a square, sharp edge for bending it.... If you want to do a few it would be better/faster to do bending of flats. If you want just one for yourself to make sure you are into the whole scene, just use a bent metal blank.

    I THINK someone needs to make a bent metal blank that has nothing cut out but the safety hole (the big hole w/slot on right side) and the magwell opening. Then, the home builder would just need to drill the rest of the holes, set the OAL to their needs (I would make them longer than a real receiver so it takes a little trimming to make them work...80% is only a state of mind ya know LOL ) install the rails and have at it.

    IS there any reason you couldnt use quality steel pop-rivets for the lower rails? Seems to me they only act as secondary guides and the ejector doesnt have much force against it. Im thinking I would like to do steel pop rivets so you can easily replace the rail if the ejector wears or needs to be moved a little for proper functioning. I dont want to use screws because they can loosen and get lost. Maybe I can just pop-rivet it to check function then plug weld them also to provide a little strength????

    GOOD LUCK BRO!

    JP

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRIMACE
    Can anyone post a real basic breakdown of what is involed for a build?
    YES I CAN:

    http://pookieweb.dyndns.org:61129/AK...nstruction.htm

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    Chief Administrator 7.62x39's Avatar
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    Here is a link to the tutorial in the library.
    AK-47 Lower Receiver Blank Build Tutorial

    Also, you can forget about pop rivets, even if they were strong enough, which I don't believe they are, there is not enough clearance for them.

    The little tits on the back side of a pop rivet would not allow you to insert a mag.
    .

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    BANNED jpglee1's Avatar
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    OK, How do screws clear if rivets dont? Do they use nuts on the screws or just tap the rail itself???
    Basically I want to be able to cycle the rifle a few times w/out the rail being perm. welded in so I can adjust it or replace it if I need to before final welding the gun. I was thinking even 1 P.R. and one spot weld would be OK... I dont want to drill out any welds if I can help it so thats why I thought of the P.R. anyway....

    For you guys w/screwed in rails, how do they handle the rigors of use? Seems to me .060" of metal isnt much to tap into. I was thinking using something like 1/4-20 screws w/nuts tacked to the rail itself...

    THANKS
    JP

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    Gunco Regular GRIMACE's Avatar
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    Yup, just building one and only one.

    So the blank is the way to go - check

    As far as the screws, i do not need an air hammer or anything else. I am not 100% comfortable with screws, but i feel they will work and not require as much effort or tools as anything else would.

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    Chief Administrator 7.62x39's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpglee1
    OK, How do screws clear if rivets dont? Do they use nuts on the screws or just tap the rail itself???
    Check reply #5 in this thread

    AK-47 Lower Receiver Blank Build Tutorial
    .

  8. #8
    bsn
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    If your just building one why not use a 100% reciever?

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    Gunco Regular shadow29483's Avatar
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    I agree, a first build on a 100% receiver is the way to go if you do not have that many tools and the set up. Believe me, your still going to have your work cut out for you regardless. Building off a "Blank" looks real easy. Then you start over sizing holes and so forth and so on. You also have to trim the top rails, order the rails, size the ejector if it's the 74/47 type, heat treat the axis pin holes and the rails, and install them. Then you can start your actual building of the weapon itself.
    I'm not being a pesamist here, I'm just realistic. If you don't have the tools.....Try the 100% receiver first. Or if not, jump right in. It has it's ups and downs just like anything else in life. But you'll be glad you did. It's a blast!!
    The number 1 ingredient is.......patients.
    We'll try and look out for ya', to help on the real ass kickers.....Hell I need all the help I can get for that matter. Ta, he, he!
    Welcome,
    -Shadow-

  10. #10
    Chief Administrator 7.62x39's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cephus
    JPGLEE1 IF YOU HAVE A WELDER JUST WELD THEM IN PLACE. DRILL A .200 HOLE PLACE THE RAIL IN THE PROPER PLACE AND TACK IN FROM THE OUTSIDE . THIS HOW I DO IT AND HAVEN'T LOST ONE YET KNOCK ON WOOD. I USE 3 HOLES ON EACH SIDE AFTER WELDING GRIND DOWN THE WELDS AND SAND.
    This method does work well.
    I did mine this way before I bought my spot welder.
    I used smaller holes (.125) and more of them (5) but the end result's the same.
    It is referred to as a rosette or plug weld and is commonly used in welding.
    .

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