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Thread: Excess Phosphate Solution?

  1. #1
    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Default Excess Phosphate Solution?

    It seems I may have the solution too strong... I'm using the Ace Hardware Ospho paint prep solution. The weld material (and some silver solder) seems to have been dissolved by the solution. I think I've forgotten to thin the solution. The MSDS label says it is a 70% solution. I should be working at about 5% solution IIRC.

    There was a TON of fizz - like an alka seltzer in soda pop. The last phosphate job had barely any bubbles in comparison.

    What do you think - solution too strong?

    http://pookieweb.dyndns.org:61129/AK...ate/ospho1.jpg

    http://pookieweb.dyndns.org:61129/AK...ate/ospho2.jpg

    http://pookieweb.dyndns.org:61129/AK...ate/ospho3.jpg

  2. #2
    Gunco Regular Thumb Clip Pull Pin's Avatar
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    Holy Smoke Batman! That thing must have really been somkin'!

    Yours,
    Thumb Clip Pull Pin.

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    Administrator pirate56's Avatar
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    Looks WAY to strong! some metals are not acid resistant like steel and will be disolved in a strong acid solution. I would boil the parts in water to get the acid out from between the parts to prevent corrosion. If I am not mistaken that stuff is for rusty metal, it's purpose is to etch away the rust and give a fresh surface to paint on.

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    That's what I thought. I'm going to check my mix again. The more I think about it, the more I think that I may have not diluted it... DOH

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    Indian Admin Winn R's Avatar
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    Jerry, Is that a Chinese receiver?

    That's one beefed up boy!!

    Never heard of the Ace product-- you use it as a pre paint?
    There is no nonsense so errant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action. -- Bertrand Russell


    "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity." Robert J. Hanlon

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Winn, that's my Saiga .223 conversion to AK-101 style.

    The stuff is called Ospho and it is found at Ace Hardware. 75% phosphoric acid by volume. Sounds very very similar to that other stuff that is mentioned on a different thread. $20 for a gallon bottle, with a distinctive green hue.

  7. #7
    hotbarrel's Avatar
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    I am wondering what else is in it. phosphoric acid and what..?

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    The MSDS info can be found here:

    http://www.ospho.com/data.htm

    "OSPHO is a balanced formula of Phosphoric acid, Sodium Dichromate, Surfactants, and Extenders."


    Downloaded the MSDS form, it says 75% phosphoric acid solution, nothing more.

    The "how to use" page says:

    RUSTED METALS - OSPHO is a rust-inhibiting coating - NOT A PAINT You do not have to remove tight rust. Merely remove loose paint and rust scale, dirt, oil, grease and other accumulations with a wire brush - apply a coat of OSPHO as it comes in the container - let dry overnight, then apply whatever paint system you desire. When applied to rusted surfaces, OSPHO causes iron oxide (rust) to chemically change to iron phosphate - an inert, hard substance that turns the metal black. Where rust is exceedingly heavy, two coats of OSPHO may be necessary to thoroughly penetrate and blacken the surface to be painted. A dry, powdery, grayish-white surface usually develops; this is normal - brush off any loose powder before paint application.


    NEW METALS - For new ferrous or aluminum metals: remove dirt, grease, or oil; apply OSPHO, let dry overnight, then paint.
    Also works on galvanized metals

    Did a quick Yahoo search for "Ospho" and confirmed you can "just brush it on" like Oxisolv, and it is reusable. I've always added steel wool but the directions don't call for that. FWIW.

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    Gunco Member greentimber's Avatar
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    Ouch!

    FYI: Stickerman's park recipie uses 75% PA with zinc oxide powder added. He gets a BEAUTIFUL park finish with it.

    Lemme see if I can find the recipie...






    Stickerman?s Parkerizing Recipe

    1000ml of distilled water
    30ml of phosphoric acid
    14 grams of zinc oxide powder

    Do it in this order:

    Protect chrome lining/barrel

    sandblast
    set the pieces in warm water
    put in park tank
    put back in the warm water
    take them out
    dry with compressed air
    spray with WD40


    If you were sandblasting assembled parts then you might go ahead and degrease them. Or if they are really caked with grease then do the individual parts. Otherwise I don't even touch them before putting them in the blast cabinet.

    The tanks I have are half size steam trays from a restaurant supply store. One is half size 4" tall and the other is half long and 4" tall. They both hold the same amount of liquid, but the regular half size is more square

  10. #10
    BANNED mbadboyz's Avatar
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    Are you wearing your safety glasses?

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