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Thread: Fire-charred wood staining-??

  1. #1
    Gunco Member john762's Avatar
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    Question Fire-charred wood staining-??

    Is there a proven technique for using fire-charring to cameoflage rifle stocks? I'm seeing rifle stocks at 100/150 yds. that standout like orange balloons or pale toothpicks.Other than paint or bedliner type material which chip-off exposing bare wood, I seem to remember hearing of a fire-charring technique that darkens & is very chip resistence. Anyone got a line about the process or do I need to pick-up some cheap stocks to try to re-discover what's a working technique ?
    "Evolution/Revolution"

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    Gunco Rookie PrivateJoker's Avatar
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    One technique I've seen done is called "sooting"...

    Custom painters sometimes do it. They get a nice carburizing (sooty) flame going on the oxy-fuel torch then wave it over the surface until they achieve their desired results, then clearcoat over it to seal it. I would assume that you could do the same to wood. I would experiment on some wood scraps, or a garbage stock first though.

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    Gunco Regular Braddog's Avatar
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    i do a lot of woodworking and sometimes use a torch. usually this is used to highlight the grain and make it pop when clear coated. I have never tried to use it for achieving a patchwork design for camo. This is interesting.

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    Gunco Regular my-rifle's Avatar
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    Braddog, can you elaborate on how you use a torch to highlight the grain? I'm curious about this. I have a couple Mosin-Nagants with nice contrasts in the wood - dark lines that make a tiger-stripe pattern that I'd like to accentuate. I removed the nasty shellac using denatured alcohol about a month ago, and before I put tung oil over it I'd like to do something to bring out that dark brown wood grain.
    * This is My Rifle *

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    Gunco Regular Braddog's Avatar
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    Keep the flame from actually touching the wood and keep moving the flame. you are trying to only scorch the wood not burn it. This takes practice so don't try it on your gun furniture until you are comfortable with this. You should sand with fine grit to get a uniform tone on the completed piece. The grain is more porous than the rest of the wood and reacts to heat more quickly. Practice on some scrap wood and have fun.

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    If you can, get a flame spreader as well. At least, don't use any concentrated flame source. You'll want a controlled char on the wood fibers. Flame graining was common in the 50's and on plywood furniture.

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    Gunco Regular Braddog's Avatar
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    This is the way most of the pretty dark grained picture frames are done.

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    Gunco Rookie Stonewall's Avatar
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    "sooting" I've seen this method of smoke finishing done on a fiberglass Benchrest stock . There was some gold flakes also . Then it was all clear coated-neat. I'd forgotten about that.

    Glenn

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    Gunsmith Fritz's Avatar
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    A lot of old flintlock rifles wear stocks that have an artificial fiddleback look to them created by wrapping the wood in a kerosene soaked rope and igniting the rope. The stock makers would extinguish the rope before it burned the stock, but the pattern that remained took a stain or finish differently and created a nice looking stock that broke up the lines to boot.



    I don't know if this helps you, but it is on topic.

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