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Thread: cracked stock repair?

  1. #11
    Gunco Member leopold stotch's Avatar
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    I like either Cyanoacrylate (also known as CA or Superglue) or a urethane glue. For a very narrow crack like that where you can't spread it apart much without the danger of further cracking I'd go with CA glue. In general I like urethane glue (like Gorilla Glue) better but it is thicker and I think you are going to want to get a hypodermic needle to inject that glue into the crack. Most urethane glues are just too viscous to push through a fairly fine needle.

    Speaking of hypodermic needles, you can generally get those at feed stores, especially if they have a tack shop.

    If you go the CA glue route, I would encourage you to go to a hobby shop and get a good quality glue. In particular, hobby shops that cater to the RC model airplane crowd will sell a variety of good quality CA glues. Don't get the thick stuff, get something with a thin to medium viscosity. I've noticed in the last several years that lots of no-name Chinese CA glue has been coming on to the market. I've seen evidence that these glues have some impurities in them as evidenced by the fact that they discolor and loose strength after only a few years. A good quality CA glue will not do this.

    I'd use some ratcheting bar clamps (harbor freight's work fine - Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices ). You can lightly dampen the wood if it is very dry, this will aid the CA glue setting up. You do want to wipe up any excess glue that squeezes out. Acetone will cut CA glue before it sets, (beware though it will probably remove any finish on the wood).

    Good luck.

  2. #12
    Gunco Member leopold stotch's Avatar
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    Incidentally, Loctite makes a good quality CA glue:

    Loctite Consumer Retail Products | Product Detail

    BTW, if you have trouble with CA (Super) glue setting up in a open bottle, here's a tip that will prevent that. Put the opened bottle (obviously with the cap on) in an airtight container (small mason jar works great) with some silica gel packets. Moisture getting to the CA glue causes it to setup by polymerization, commonly causing opened bottle/tubes to completely harden and render themselves useless in a couple of months (depending on how humid your local environment is and the quality of the glue and packaging). By keeping the moisture at bay you can extend the useful life of an open partially used tube for a long while.
    Last edited by leopold stotch; 06-01-2009 at 12:58 AM.

  3. #13
    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    I went ahead and used the loctite brand superglue on the crack. I held the tip of the bottle up to the crack while it was spread apart and squirted the glue in until I could see it on the inside of the stock. I did this every 3/4" or so along the length of the crack, then closed it with finger pressure for several minutes before placing several tiny bungy cords on it overnight. It turned out great, but I still ended up sanding it some to get the excess superglue off. You have to know where the crack was to see it now and it just looks like the rest of the normal coarse grain in that area. When ever I get it refinished I'll get a pic of it up.

  4. #14
    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    Super! Glad it worked for you. I was impressed the first time I used superglue, I never would have thought it did such a good job.
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

  5. #15
    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    So this might be a little backwards, but is there any type of stripper that would be best to remove the old finish that wont attact the super glue?
    Last edited by moleman; 06-19-2009 at 07:42 AM.

  6. #16
    Gunco Member leopold stotch's Avatar
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    Oops, yes, it is a little backwards. I thought you were trying to fix a crack in a finished piece of wood that you didn't want to refinish. I probably misunderstood.

    Acetone will dissolve CA glue for sure, and I suspect some of the usual organic solvents will as well (Xylene, MEK, Ethylene Chloride, etc.). Many strippers contain these sorts of solvents, look on the label to see if the stripper you are thinking of using contains them. You could squirt a little blob of the glue on a piece of scrap and let it set up then try your stripper on it to see if it dissolves. As you have surmised, it would have been better to strip the finish first, then glue up the crack.

    Also, if the wood is something that you can strip the finish from mechanically (i.e. sanding) then no issues with that.

    No big worry though, if the glue dissolves and the crack re-opens after you strip the finish you can always re-glue it before you refinish.

    Let us know how it goes.

  7. #17
    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    I was hoping not to have to sand or anything, but the super glue soaked into the wood along either side of the seam and made it a little darker. I ended up sanding the stock as little as possible to remove the glue stain, then lightly sanded the stock so the new finish would blend with the old. I'll get a pic up in a bit. It turned out pretty good, I had to resist the urge to sand it more to try and remove the belt sander marks left from when it was arsenal refinished. It looked like they used 40 or 60 grit on the belt sander.

  8. #18
    gunco irregular moleman's Avatar
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    Ok, here it is. I didn't try to remove all the belt sander marks or make the repaired area too good looking compared to the rest of the stock which looks like it was sanded with very coarse 60 grit belt sander or worse. If thats what its supposed to look like for a rearsenaled stock, then thats what its supposed to look like. Here's a before and after. Thanks for all the input and suggestions, I like how it turned out.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by moleman; 06-21-2009 at 08:20 AM. Reason: spelling

  9. #19
    Crazy Norwegian Sid_Vicious's Avatar
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    NICE! It turned out great.

  10. #20
    Gunco Member leopold stotch's Avatar
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    That came out really fine. First class work there. Thumbs up!

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