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Thread: Light Pine Tar vs. Regular Pine Tar on AK Laminate Wood

  1. #1
    Gunco Regular Johnny 5.56's Avatar
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    Default Light Pine Tar vs. Regular Pine Tar on AK Laminate Wood

    I'm trying to replicate the patina look on original AK-74 laminate birch wood. I am going to strip the old finish (horrible baby poop yellowish-brown) and then attempt to give it that orange/yellow look.

    I was given some good advice and told to use Swedish Pine Tar over the stain, before applying shellac, in order to give it the patina look. What I need to confirm is whether to use the light pine tar or the original darker pine tar. I think that the light pine tar may be more suitable, but I'm not sure.

    Best Method for Cutting and Applying Pine Tar

    I would also like to know how to cut the pine tar. I've been that some sources recomend using turpentine and some use a mix of turpentine and organic or boilded linseed oil.

    Noxudol Pine Tar Products

    I greatly appreciate your help.
    Thanks,
    Johnny.


    Example of the Color I'd like.


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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    I've used pine tar to restore stock finish on repaired Finn M39 stocks. It's likely what was used in the field to maintain the stock. Pine tar is a traditional preservative in the Scandinavian countries. I applied it in the same manner as it was used on cross-country skis, such as is described at Wooden Cross Country Skis

    The Soviets never used it on their AK stocks, to my best knowledge. While it may or may not give the look you seek, it's not an authentic finish.

    Oh, yah. I've used both "real" swedish pine tar and pine tar bought at the farm supply houses. I disagree with self-proclaimed "experts" - there is no difference in result between the two in my experience. The domestic pine tar is MUCH less expensive, however.
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

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    Gunco Regular Johnny 5.56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjohnson View Post
    I've used pine tar to restore stock finish on repaired Finn M39 stocks. It's likely what was used in the field to maintain the stock. Pine tar is a traditional preservative in the Scandinavian countries. I applied it in the same manner as it was used on cross-country skis, such as is described at Wooden Cross Country Skis

    The Soviets never used it on their AK stocks, to my best knowledge. While it may or may not give the look you seek, it's not an authentic finish.

    Oh, yah. I've used both "real" swedish pine tar and pine tar bought at the farm supply houses. I disagree with self-proclaimed "experts" - there is no difference in result between the two in my experience. The domestic pine tar is MUCH less expensive, however.
    Mr. Johnson to the rescue again! As for the pine tar, I read that it needs to be mixed 50/50 with turpentine and then applied to the wood, allowed to dry, and then followed up with a coat of turpentine. The process is then repeated until the desired look is achieved.

    What cutting and appliation method did you use?

    Thanks!

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    Gunco Maniac sjohnson's Avatar
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    I applied it just as done in the link given in my first reply. Thinning was not necessary, but turpentine would seem appropriate, as pine tar and turpentine are both products of the production of pine distillates.

    A maritime museum uses both paint thinner and turpentine, recipe at Pine Tar; History And Uses
    I have a daughter. I tell her, "911 is what you dial after you're raped. 1911 is what you should have before they try."

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    Gunco Regular Johnny 5.56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjohnson View Post
    I applied it just as done in the link given in my first reply. Thinning was not necessary, but turpentine would seem appropriate, as pine tar and turpentine are both products of the production of pine distillates.

    A maritime museum uses both paint thinner and turpentine, recipe at Pine Tar; History And Uses
    Thanks. I'm going to try it out and post pics once I've finished.

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