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Thread: Saiga 90deg. gas block VS 45deg. ?

  1. #1
    Gunco Member dragonwolf's Avatar
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    Default Saiga 90deg. gas block VS 45deg. ?

    I took my Saiga GB (gas block) off & put on a Romy 45deg. GB. It appears that the top of the GB sits 1/2" back closer to the FT trunnion. Now my Romy GT (gas tube) is a 1/2" too long.
    Is there another GT I can use or can mine be modified?

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    Gunco Regular allesennogwat's Avatar
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    No, you really throw off everything doing that. There is the gas tube and the gas piston and the port isn't a perfect match. If you want a bayonet lug you should use an AK-74 vertical gas block and an AK-74 gas tube. Some people have moved the Romanian gas block and redrilled the gas port in the barrel. The Romanian gas block is one of the few, besides the Norinco gas block, that isn't chrome lined.

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    Gunco Member dragonwolf's Avatar
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    I'm not concerned so much with a bayonet lug as much as I'm really going for the true AKM look. I guess I should have mentioned this is a 7.62x39.
    That's a good idea of just redrilling the gas port hole. Didn't really want to, but it'll work.

    Thanks for your advice,

    D.

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    Gunco Member beohexeares's Avatar
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    I put a Russian 45deg gas block on mine.What I did is taped the old gas port out (I think 8/32). I only taped it out about 3/4 of the way down (just so I know it would never come loose into the barrel). I then put a grade 8 set screw with locktight in nice and tight. Then hand filed it flush with the top of the barrel. Will never see it again.
    I wanted the classic ak look also. I bought a russian kit from Atlantic and used the stock set, handguard retainer, gb, fsb, sight leaf, trigger guard, pg screw and nut, cleaning rod, and sling.
    I ended up getting in the kit a late model cast 45deg gb so it worked out great. The only thing I had to use besides my US parts was a Bulgy gas tube with no numbers because I didnt want to use the Russian one because it had numbers that matched the rest of the kit that I bought and wouldnt match and numbers on the Saiga. They have Russian top cover without numbers that I might buy in place of the Saiga top cover just so it looks more like the older Russian AKM's.
    After I reparkerize it I will post pics.
    Hope that helped.

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    BANNED nalioth's Avatar
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    Changing out gas blocks requires you to plug and weld the existing gas hole and drill a new one (a 45 gas block requires the hole be 45) that the new gas block will work with.

    The 90 block is functionally superior to the older 45 block, and changing it for "looks" is plumb stupid, IMHO.

    If you want "looks" buy an airsoft AK.

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    Gunco Member dragonwolf's Avatar
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    [quote=nalioth;609427]Changing out gas blocks requires you to plug and weld the existing gas hole and drill a new one (a 45 gas block requires the hole be 45) that the new gas block will work with.

    The 90 block is functionally superior to the older 45 block,

    I have to agree with natlioth. Plugging a gas port with a screw & locktite won't work! It will leak almost immediately. It has to be welded.
    I gave up on the 45 deg GB & stuck with the 90 deg, but I'm making a forward CH like the G3 as well as other MODs. It won't look much like an AK when it's done - Oh well, it'll be functional.
    I know I'll catch a lot of grief when I post pics.

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Changing it out for looks is a great idea!

    It will work and is completely doable. You will have to plug the original and drill a new port. Been there, done it in reverse:

    http://pookieweb.dyndns.org:61129/AK.../gas_block.htm
    Last edited by hcpookie; 11-01-2010 at 11:06 AM. Reason: editorial removed
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    Gunco Member beohexeares's Avatar
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    [quote=nalioth;609427]Changing out gas blocks requires you to plug and weld the existing gas hole and drill a new one (a 45 gas block requires the hole be 45) that the new gas block will work with.

    The 90 block is functionally superior to the older 45 block, and changing it for "looks" is plumb stupid, IMHO.

    If you want "looks" buy an airsoft AK.[/quot


    I am not to sure I want a welder near my barrel, heard a few ppl say it's not good, but I dont know. The way I have done it is the same way many others have done it in the past.
    As far as changing for looks being plumb stupid, well thats why you havnt done it , hey thanks for the tip. As far as the airsoft goes, nah I wanted a real russian classic looking rifle. Build what you feel you want, I'll build what I want. But thanks for the opinion.

  9. #9
    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    "Why not" do it!

    Don't worry about the weld, if you do it right it won't impart that much heat into it as you are only going to weld enough to make the plug stick in place. That heat is going to affect the barrel but not cause a catastrophic failure. All those FALs and ARs out there with AWB silver soldered muzzle brakes are testament to the amount of heat can be used on a barrel with no ill effect. If you were to impart enough heat to 'affect' the barrel, what you would have is a kink that would 'fix' the barrel in a certain orientation. What does that mean? That means you may have to adjust your sights to the new zero, but nothing more.

    Of course, this is assuming you weld it 'good'. Not brazing it with a MAPP torch, or hitting it with an ARC welder. A MIG or TIG is the best, and a TIG is preferred. You can use the heat paste and wet rags around the area to weld to help absorb that extra heat. But for the short time you're going to be welding that small area, I honestly would think it would be fine to weld and then just let it air cool down to room temperature. We're talking an 11/64" hole and you need to weld enough to secure a plug in place. 2 seconds would probably be too long.

    If anything, perhaps a fan or air hose to blow on the area during the weld to help the air cooling. I don't think I would pour water or oil on it to quench as that would cool it down too fast and would be more likely to kink the barrel, if any.

    In honesty the way I did it - tapping and installing a screw cut to fit - wasn't really as difficult as you might think. It was definitely tedious!!! But the loctite has held and it hasn't went anywhere since 2002 ? when I did it.

    Then get it all sanded smooth and measure then cut the new hole! The trick for the new hole is of course drilling the bottom of the hole and getting shavings into the barrel due to the drill bit deforming the bottom of the hole and pushing the shavings down into the bore before they are cut off. You'll have to support the bottom with a plug such as an aluminum, wood, or brass rod that you gently hammer into position to support the drill bit. That helps minimize the shavings, and a good sharp drill to finish helps as well. Use a smaller pilot drill to drill through, then the shavings will be much smaller and easier to deal with. Then tap out the rod, and inspect.

    You'll probably have a little bit of shavings to deal with, but you can usually deal with that with small files (assuming the 11/64" hole) and a copper cleaning brush. I have been told not to reverse direction inside the bore with copper as it could damage the chrome lining, but what you are doing is basically scraping off those shavings to get a nice smooth finish that doesn't shave the jackets. Sharp drills, low speed, and using small pilot drill bits helps minimize all of this.

    If you just press down real hard with the final sized bit you'll be likely to get shavings at the bottom of the hole and can nick the other side of the barrel, so go VERY slow when you drill it.
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    The "original" Boltcutter Rivet Squeezers:
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    Project Pink - the Pink and Blue AK-74:
    http://pookieweb.net/pink/pink.htm

  10. #10
    Gunco Good ole boy kernelkrink's Avatar
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    Rapidly cooling hot steel, even with air, can harden it. Brittle bbl + pressure= split bbl. Let it cool naturally.

    Drive a jacketed bullet into the bore where the drill will come through. The tight fit and deformation into the rifling grooves will remove any tendency to burr when the bit breaks through. Also, see brass and lead shavings, time to stop before you hit the other side of the bore.

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