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Thread: Food Storage Essentials: How does honey compare to sugar?

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    GuncoHolic Black Blade's Avatar
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    Default Food Storage Essentials: How does honey compare to sugar?

    Food Storage Essentials: How does honey compare to sugar?



    Raw honey

    The honey available in stores has water added to keep it runny.

    Raw honey crystallizes, causing it to become hard. After purchasing, it is simple to transfer the honey to pint canning jars or old jam jars. Crystals can then be quickly melted either in the microwave on high for 1-2 minutes, stirred and heated briefly again as needed, or honey can be heated in a pan of water on low heat.

    Care should be taken not to overheat honey that causes it to become very thick when it cools. If this accidentally happens, add a little water to thin it down. Once honey crystals are melted, honey stays fluid for a while.

    Raw honey is more easily found in the spring and fall after bees have had time in warm weather to pollinate flowers and subsequently make honey.

    Cost

    Honey is definitely more expensive than sugar. It is easy to find sales on sugar, particularly at holidays.

    Sweetness

    Honey is sweeter than sugar, which makes it possible use less. Substitute approximately one-third less honey for sugar in bread recipes. When substituting honey for sugar in other recipes, reduce the liquid a little or, if there is no additional liquid in the recipe, add a little more flour to compensate for the viscosity of the honey. Cooks.com gives specifics on adjustments to be made.

    Shelf life

    Honey lasts for a very long time, but not indefinitely. Over time it will gradually darken and develop a stronger flavor and eventually turns black. Itís best to use it over time and replace it as it is used.

    Sugar stores indefinitely, without the need to rotate it.

    Continued: http://www.deseretnews.com/article/8...-to-sugar.html


    Black Blade: I store honey myself but it is just a preference on my part. I little Yerba Mate tea and a spoonful of honey late morning is one of my minor vices.
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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    GuncoHolic Sprat's Avatar
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    honey does not spoil, It was found in the tombs of the Pharo's in eygpt and is healther than suger or at least processed suger, raw brown sugar is better for you
    one of my vices is Lyon's Irish blend Tea( $6-8 a box) with cream/milk and sugar ( bad habit I picked up in Ireland) from the time I get up to after lunch
    Sprat and sprat1 are one and the same.

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    Cranky Curmudgeon zoom6zoom's Avatar
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    Honey can also be used as a topical antibiotic. But don't give honey to infants under six months old.
    Certified AR-15/M-16 Armorer / SIG Pistol Armorer

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    NoWorkCamp4Me railbuggy's Avatar
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    I buy the 24oz or 12oz bottles from my local ALDI store and add one to a prep box of canned goods. I think my stepson and his family are Democrats. About twice a year the X wants me to take boxes of my preps over to feed his starving wife and kids. But he finds money to buy a 12pk everyday.
    SOON-We already lost the war. You are the resistance.

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    Gunco Veteran stalker1's Avatar
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    Myself and a few friends used to take bee pollen caps for allergies and it worked great. Another co worker heard us talk about it and bought some for his wife. Who was allergic to bee stings.hospital time for her for severe reaction.

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    GuncoHolic Sprat's Avatar
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    I don't have allegries per se, pollen occasionally.
    local lore has it that if you use local honey ( not store bought from god knows where) it will ward off the allergies
    store bought is great for sugar subsitiute or receipes
    Sprat and sprat1 are one and the same.

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    5 Reasons to Stock Honey as a Survival Food



    by Tim MacWelch

    Just because honey is one of humanity’s oldest sweet treats, doesn’t mean it’s an outdated relic. It’s a top-choice food item for preppers and survivalists to stock in their emergency food stores. Here are five good reasons to join Pooh bear on the honey band wagon.

    1. Honey doesn’t go bad. Yes, it may crystallize and get a little funny looking, but that just indicates it’s real honey. Warm up an old jar of honey under some hot water, and it reverts back to its viscous golden form. It might not last “forever,” but neither will we. Honey is naturally anti-microbial, and acts as its own preservative.

    2. Honey can be used in wound care. While a dab of Neosporin might do a better job of healing cuts, scrapes, burns, and scratches, don’t rule out honey as a backup medicinal. The properties that make it antimicrobial can be very helpful in infection prevention. Honey also keeps the wound moist, which facilitates healing, too.

    3. Honey is calorie dense. Calories are food energy and the fuel that keeps us going. Although fatty foods have higher calories per ounce than honey, they have a short shelf life. Go with something that lasts for the long haul and you’ll get more of it. Honey contains 60 calories per tablespoon, and 1,290 calories per pound.

    4. Honey makes a sweet bait. For numerous trap set styles, honey can be an aromatic lure for omnivores with a sweet tooth. Opossum and raccoon are readily drawn to honey, but be alert that you might score a skunk with honey, too.

    5. Honey can be used to make hooch. This isn’t rotgut, jailhouse pruno, or brown baby—this is classy stuff. For thousands of years, people have turned honey into alcoholic beverages. Mead is the most common form available today. It is similar to a white wine, but it tastes of honey rather than grape. To make mead, all you’ll need is a gallon jug, two pounds of honey, three quarts of clean water, one pack of champagne yeast, a wine lock for the glass jug, and some food-safe disinfectant (vodka works well). Boil your honey and water for 15 minutes, then allow the mix to cool to room temperature. Add the champagne yeast (or white wine yeast) to the cool liquid. Pour the blend into the sanitized glass jug, and add the sanitized wine lock to the top. Allow it to bubble for six weeks in a dark, room-temperature environment. Pour the liquid off the sediment into a new clean jug, and cap it. Age the mead in a cool dark place for a few months and then enjoy this highly alcoholic ancestral nectar.

    One final note: If your honey comes in a plastic container, you’ll want to repackage it in glassware. Hungry and merciless rodents can make quick work of the thin plastic bottles that are commonly used for honey packaging, leaving your pantry shelves a gooey mess. Mason jars with metal lids are a much more secure container.

    5 Reasons to Stock Honey as a Survival Food | Outdoor Life Survival
    When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America , you get a front row seat. - George Carlin


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