"Rust Patina" on Yugos?
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Thread: "Rust Patina" on Yugos?

  1. #1
    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Default "Rust Patina" on Yugos?

    Isn't there a way to reproduce the rusted look? I seem to recall reading a long time back about 18th century muzzle loaders being finished with a "brown" finish similar to blueing.

    I'm attempting to match the receiver and muzzle attachment to my Yugo kit. The kit has initials carved on it and it is obvious it has been used "in real life". I intend to keep the original finish, so stripping and cleaning the parts is NOT an option. I've already blued the receiver but you can tell it doesn't match that original finish:

    http://pookieweb.dyndns.org:61129/Yu...0_complete.htm

    Thoughts? I haven't yet looked at Brownell's or any place like that. I'm thinking that there must be some "kitchen method" that the 18th century builders used, and I'd rather do it on the cheap since I'm doing this to exactly one receiver and exactly one muzzle attachment.
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    Gunco Member rorschach's Avatar
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    Salt water and high humidity should do the trick.

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Yes and I have plenty of both around here

    I guess I'm looking for a home-brew recipe that can produce this:

    167-000-002 5 oz. Plum Brown $9.10 - Birchwood Casey PLUM BROWN - For chemically browning antiques and muzzleloaders, and for sportsmen preferring the brown color to black or blue. Easy to use. Gives deep color and metal penetration.
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    http://pookieweb.net


    The "original" Boltcutter Rivet Squeezers:
    http://pookieweb.net/AK/rivet/boltcutters/boltcutter.htm


    Project Pink - the Pink and Blue AK-74:
    http://pookieweb.net/pink/pink.htm

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    Gunco Regular pupwag's Avatar
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    If you cold blued that cold steel you might just wipe the oil off the outside and wait a few months.The cold blue is not that durable and will continue to oxidize for months(stinks too).The one I did 6 or so months ago has continued to darken and has some wear on the high spots.It has a faint rust brown hue in spots in direct sunlight.In other words it is looking more like the parts I did not refinish as time passes.Hmm,perhaps I have stumbled into a universal truth-nothing ages things like time.Get it out of the safe and into the sun,maybe give it some whiskey and cigarettes,should be looking well aged in short order.
    It's only metal, it's not magic.

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    Gunco Veteran tony's Avatar
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    Try this website: www.craftguard.com The may be able to point you in some direction?

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    dkf1998's Avatar
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    Hcpookie, Birchwood Casey makes a product called Plum Brown Barrel Finish, very simple to use, if thats not what you are looking for I have a couple other browning recipies and will post them upon request, hope this helps.

    Duane

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    dkf1998's Avatar
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    Hcpookie, didn't read your post Re: Plum Brown Finish, oops....

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    Happy Camper hcpookie's Avatar
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    Yeah, if you could, please post the browning recipes. Thanks!
    Gunco Member #10

    http://pookieweb.net


    The "original" Boltcutter Rivet Squeezers:
    http://pookieweb.net/AK/rivet/boltcutters/boltcutter.htm


    Project Pink - the Pink and Blue AK-74:
    http://pookieweb.net/pink/pink.htm

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    Unclear Engineer ozzy the nuke's Avatar
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    I have a book at home that is full of blueing/browning recipes. I am on the road now, but if you can hold out until the weekend, I could scan and email you a page or two. IIRC, the only problem is that most of the recipes call for at least one chemical that is not readily available. If someone doesnt come up with something in the meantime, I'll take a look when I get home.
    No matter what happens, somebody will find a way to take it too seriously. ~Dave Barry, Dave Barry Turns 50

  11. #10
    dkf1998's Avatar
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    Very basic browning:

    1 pt. distilled water
    5 table spoons common table salt

    Mix with a glass stirrer or equiv. in a clean glass cont. Prepare metal- remove rust, finish and polish. grease bore and plug barrel w/wooden dowel. Degrease (very important step!). Apply solution with cotton ball, apply evenly, no streaks or runs (very important!)
    Let parts rust in a cool damp place for 12 hours or until desired rust is formed.If solution was applied evenly the finish should be even if not try again. Using 00 or 000 steel wool that has been degeased (very important) remove all the loose rust that has formed (carding). When all the loose rust has been removed apply another even coat of browning and let it rust again. Repeat application 10-15 times to achive desired shade of brown. This give you a muddy shade of brown, you can also soak your parts in a very dilluted solution of copper sulphate ( .01-.02 % in distilled water) this will give you a "Plum Brown finish" That Birchwood Casey is probably lookin pretty good right now, browning is very time consuming and generaly used to restore antique muzzleloaders, I have another recipe that I found in a old gunsmithing book, i'm not sure if all the ingredients can be easily found.

    This one was a 1800s U.S. armory finish

    1.5 oz. grain alcohol
    1.5 oz. tincture of ferric chloride
    .5 oz. mercuric chloride
    1.5 oz. ethyl nitrate
    1 oz. copper sulfate
    .75 oz. nitric acid

    Mix these ingredients with a qt. of soft water, and store in a dark glass bottle. prepare metal parts as descibed above, apply solution with a clean rag or sponge with even strokes. Expose the parts to air for 24 hrs. then card it with steel wool or a wire brush, do not remove the stain below the rust. re-apply mixture, it ill be ready for carding in a few hrs. repeat application 2 or 3 times a day for 4 or 5 days. this will make a dark brown finish. When the barrel is sufficently brown and the rust has been carefuly removed a qt. of boiling water should be poured over the parts to stop the action of the acid mixture. When the parts cool they should be rubbed with linseed oil using a soft brush.

    Not sure if this is what you are looking for but those are 2 of many different methods, hope this helps...

    Duane

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