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Thread: Anyone tried home blueing

  1. #61
    Gunco Regular my-rifle's Avatar
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    The operative temperature is 290° - 305°. To get the temperature that high, use a turkey-frier (or crawfish boiler here in New Orleans) burner and a propane tank. Add lye to keep the solution from boiling at a lower temperature.
    * This is My Rifle *

  2. #62
    Gunco Member ammoboy2's Avatar
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    Myrifle

    Your temps are for the Ammonium Nitrate mix, the soda of nitrate should be about 255 to 265 degrees F. If you operate near 300 with the soda of nitrate mix then it is likely to get a lot of scale.

  3. #63
    Gunco Regular my-rifle's Avatar
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    I see. The temps are different for the two mixtures, eh? This is why the meat thermometer is so important to the process.
    * This is My Rifle *

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  5. #64
    Gunco Regular my-rifle's Avatar
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    There's been some discussion of late about home rust bluing. Brownells selles a product called "Classic Rust Blue" (I think) that comes in a 4 or 5 oz. bottle. The story is that after degreasing your parts you brush it on, then leave the parts for a day or two to allow them to rust, then you boil the parts to stop the rust. Using a carding brush brush off the rust that has formed, and your parts will be a bit darker. Repeat the process five or six times to get a deep black finish similar (but reportedly more durable) to the hot caustic bluing that we're doing.
    * This is My Rifle *

  6. #65
    Gunco Regular Dirty Harry's Avatar
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    I'm giving the rust blue method a try. I'm not having the success that the originator of the rust bluing thread had but I think my errors have been corrected. I'll put some pics up soon.
    Want to buy: Tantal Left and Right side selector parts.


    RRORC!
    I'm no sheep!

  7. #66
    Gunco Regular my-rifle's Avatar
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    The thread originator over at AKFiles suggested that hot bluing is a bad alternative to rust bluing. Interestingly he has not tried hot bluing. I haven't tried rust bluing, but I can vouch for the effectiveness of hot bluing. The other day I was visiting my building buddy's house for a build party when I noticed his iron bluing tank sitting out in the yard - rusting. I commented to him about it, and he laughed and turned the tank around for me to see. Where it had been hot-blued there was no sign of rust at all - in New Orleans, three houses away from the river - humidity central. Not one of my hot-blued rifles has shown any sign of rusting either even though I don't oil two of my hot-blued AKs at all - ever. This bluing method is extremely effective, and it has the advantage of being more thorough than rust bluing. What I will give to rust bluing is that it has been suggested that the finish is more durable. I have to take the person's word on this, because none of us has tested it yet.
    * This is My Rifle *

  8. #67
    firearms enthusiast kurts_armory's Avatar
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    i have used some super blue cold blueing solution to refinish an old shotgun. it was a first time experiment and it turned out looking a lot better than before i started. one thing about cold blue is that it kind of looks "thin" compared to hot blue. the only way to see if it is any good for your purposes is to research it and experiment.

  9. #68
    GuncoHolic BigAl's Avatar
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    I'm ready to get back into the bluing again. My 'smith is taking toooooo damn long to turn stuff around so I'll do it myself.

    on a side note, he said do not use aluminum oxide to blast firearms with. he says the aluminum can impregnate itself in the metal and affect the results. only use glass beads.

    i don't know but it sounds possible..

  10. #69
    Gunco Member ammoboy2's Avatar
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    I have blasted parts with Al oxide and gotten good results. I believe what is important is the cleaning of the parts prior to the blue bath. My biggest problems have been contamination by things like old hidden grease in magazines that the boiling did not remove and Al rivets in the stainless steel pan I was doing the bluing in. I was really pissed off when the rivets started desolving into the solution and contaminated my solution. The handles not staying on was another added feature.

  11. #70
    Gunco Regular my-rifle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammoboy2 View Post
    I have blasted parts with Al oxide and gotten good results. I believe what is important is the cleaning of the parts prior to the blue bath. My biggest problems have been contamination by things like old hidden grease in magazines that the boiling did not remove and Al rivets in the stainless steel pan I was doing the bluing in. I was really pissed off when the rivets started desolving into the solution and contaminated my solution. The handles not staying on was another added feature.

    I cannot emphasize enough the importance of thoroughly cleaning and degreasing. I mean thoroughly too. Completely disassemble the rifle as much as possible. Now start with brake cleaner, and use two cans of the spray-on stuff to really get the parts clean. You should wear gloves while doing this too, so you don't get fingerprints on the parts. Next get some black iron wire (It's important to use pure iron here.), and suspend the parts in a boiling solution of four to five gallons of distilled water and a quarter-cup of trisodium phosphate (TSP) which is easily available at most hardware stores. This stuff is like super-soap, and finishes the degreasing process, removing the brake cleaner residue as well. Boil for as long as possible; an hour is good. Two is better. Getting the oil out from under rivets and under the receiver shell where it's pressed against the trunnions is really important.

    Now for my tanks I use iron bluing tanks from Brownells. they cost $40 each, and you will have no problems with them. In one of them degrease while in the other bring your bluing salts up to their correct temperature. When your degreasing is complete remove the parts from the distilled water, and move them to the bluing tank. During this process do not touch any parts to be blued. Touch only the wires you hung the parts from. When you put the parts into the salts hang them at least an inch above the bottom of the tank. If they sit on the bottom, a material tends to build up on them, and you'll have to brush it off. To do this I put a chair on either end of the tank, and run a 2x4 from the top of one to the other. From this gantry I hang the gun parts in the salts.

    I leave them in for 30 minutes, then remove them and boil them again in the distilled water to remove the salts from the metal.
    This step is very important. If you don't get all the salts off, they will gradually seep out corroding the steel of the gun. This would be Very Bad. Boil for about an hour. That should do it. Remove from the water. Let dry. Oil thoroughly then reassemble. Shoot rifle.
    * This is My Rifle *

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