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Mystic Knight of the Sea
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 2002 Ford F350, and it has about 27,000 miles on it. I'm hearing a slight noise that sounds like the sensor in the brake pads when they wear down to a certain thickness. I've changed a lot of brake pads and brake shoes on older vehicles - a piece of cake. But, I understand you have to be careful if you have a vehicle with anti-lock brakes, in that something can be damaged when you squeeze the piston back into the caliper.

Perhaps I'm lucky, but I changed my front brakes on my 1999 Ford F250 and it had anti-lock brakes, and didn't have any problems.

Can any of you mechanics fill me in what the deal is?
 

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I once changed a set of pads on a 93 Camaro with ABS. Didn't have any problem with the calipers. What you do have to watch out for are the sensors. Depending upon the type of system, some operate by limiting the pressure to the calipers/wheel cylinders, and some have individual sensors on all four wheels. The one I worked on was the one that limited the pressure.

The funny thing is I was going to start a thread with the same question for a second opinion. I have an 89 Celebrity with a 2.8 multi-port fuel injected engine. When I mash the gas pedal, It will take off fine for about a second and then lose power. It doesn't miss, cough, run rough or anything like that. My guess is that it is starving for gas. My first guess is that the fuel filter is partially plugged. And that the fuel pump will pump up necessary pressure for a little bit, but when I step on it, that it won't keep up due to restriction. As long as I apply the gas gently, it will run fine.

Any Ideas?
 

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deactive ~ and in trouble
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How about a reformed mechanic? :lol:

NP on resetting the pistons with ABS as long as you don't overfill the master cylinder. If you go to quicky lube places more than likely it's been overfilled. The levels go down as the pads and shoes wear and gorillias refill it. When you reset the pistons fluid goes everywhere. Used to piss me off ;)

The Celebrity sounds like a fuel filter alright. If it makes a balking wah wah type sound in the exhust though while it's bogged down it's the cat converter.
 

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There are a few oddball models of cars out there that will not take kindly to just squeezing the pistons back into the calipers. Fortunately you Ford is not one of them. Just put a rag over the master a compress the pistons back in and you should be fine. Unless you are removing the rotors the ABS sensors should not even be visible. Replace the pads, pump the pedal a few times, check the fluid level and take it for a test drive. Just as a matter of habit I always put the brakes into modulation once or twice to make sure that everything is working fine. The first couple of years of ABS brakes just never seemed to have a good pedal after you replaced the pads unless you threw it into modulation. Find a long parking lot or an empty road, get it going about 30-35mph and stand on the brakes, if it locks up and slides (which it won't as long as the ABS light is out) then the ABS is not working and if you feel the brakes modulating as they should then everything is fine.

Just a wild a$$ guess on the Celebrity, it sounds more like the cat balling up on you than the fuel filter. You say that when you mash the pedal it does this, is this the only time or does it do it when you just give it a little gas? If it is not a cat plugging up on you the first thing I would do is check your fuel pressure, I see more pumps go bad than filters plug up. Of course if it is a bad pump you will want to put a new filter in it anyhow. It is the chicken or the egg deal with those two components, did the clogged filter cause the pump to go out or did the pump just take a crap?

Good luck guys, hope it helps. If you every want some really truly expert mechanical advice you need to hit me up about Volvos or BMWs as that is what I actually get paid to fix, although I work on most of the other stuff at my neighbors shop on a regular basis too.
 

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My dad had that issue with the fuel on his Subaru. It was a fuel pump going south and once it was replaced it was fine. He thought it was the filter as well or pressure regulator. I know at about 100,000 miles or so a fuel pump often goes bad.
 

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I'm not a vehicle mechanic, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn last night...
Sounds like a fuel pump taking a shit...
ABS should be fine. The sensor for the ABS is a little prox switch that looks at the rotor turning. When it sees the rotor stop turning, it tells the computer to pulse the brakes. In my Chevy it sat on a little bracket behind the rotor. even if you took the rotor off, you wouldn't harm the sensor. I think the ford may be somewhat similar.
 

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SangRun Hunter said:
I know at about 100,000 miles or so a fuel pump often goes bad.
Not a problem, it's has 200,000 on it. Ha, Ha
 

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Pogo said:
I have a 2002 Ford F350, and it has about 27,000 miles on it. I'm hearing a slight noise that sounds like the sensor in the brake pads when they wear down to a certain thickness. I've changed a lot of brake pads and brake shoes on older vehicles - a piece of cake. But, I understand you have to be careful if you have a vehicle with anti-lock brakes, in that something can be damaged when you squeeze the piston back into the caliper.

Perhaps I'm lucky, but I changed my front brakes on my 1999 Ford F250 and it had anti-lock brakes, and didn't have any problems.

Can any of you mechanics fill me in what the deal is?
I am a certified mechanic and from what I have been taught, the proper way to push the pistons back into the caliper is to open the bleeder screw, so that the fluid that is in the piston and line flows out of the system, not back up the line into the abs control system. Any dirt that gets lodged into the abs unit can cause a lot of problems. As long as you close the bleeder screw before releasing the pressure on the collapsed pistons you will not suck in any air. This is how dealership mechanics are trained, but not everyone does it the proper way. It's a crap shoot if you don't. I have seen several abs control boxes that had to be replaced because they became clogged up by improper piston reseating. ak'sr4me
 

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Mystic Knight of the Sea
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks,

Sometime in the next week or so I'm going to change the pads. I'll allow the fluid to bleed out as I depress the piston.
 

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For those of you that said it was the filter, you were right. And for those of you that said pump, well I'm not saying I told you so or anything like that, but I'm glad you were wrong. I'll take a $10 part over a $150 part any day of the week.
 
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