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I did a simple Cold Blue on a Yugo reweld to refinish the new metal:






The weld marks are really only visible if you look for them (I can't even see all of them clearly) The bluing looks a little weird (and even rusty-it's really not) in the pics but in person it looks really good. I just followed the instructions in the manual and on here:

Collecting and Shooting the Nagant M-44 Rifle
Collecting and Shooting the Military Surplus Rifle - Reblueing a Rifle

It was overall very simple to use and I will be rebluing a couple mosins soon.

Enjoy,
Andy
 

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I don't know much about blueing but I can assure you that the blindhogg method is the best I've found for Yugo parts kits! You can even get a parked look on blasted parts but the high spots wear quickly. Currently I'm trying to get the salts deeper in the metal.
 

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Can you "do" a Hot Blue over a previously Hot Blued rifle?

I have a Very Good Condition YUGO M70 Barrel/Trunnion/Ft End Assembly that is currently riveted to a folded, bare steel, flat. So I have a Hot Blued Front End and a Bare Steel Receiver.

I'd like to have the entire assembly hot blued, BUT - I do not want to remove the front end assembly from the folded flat- hence my question.

If this is possible, what type of prep work (if any) would you recommend?

Thanks in advance,
Rapidblast
 

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I haven't hot blued over previously blue parts but I don't see why you couldn't as long as you thoroughly degrease the metal.
 

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Yes you can or you can just use muriatic acid to remove all the old bluing and reblue. Unfortunately bluing is not that protective... I recently blued my M76 build and now plan to go back and spray on duracoat clear to see if that gives it a little better protection.
 

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Can you "do" a Hot Blue over a previously Hot Blued rifle?

I have a Very Good Condition YUGO M70 Barrel/Trunnion/Ft End Assembly that is currently riveted to a folded, bare steel, flat. So I have a Hot Blued Front End and a Bare Steel Receiver.

I'd like to have the entire assembly hot blued, BUT - I do not want to remove the front end assembly from the folded flat- hence my question.

If this is possible, what type of prep work (if any) would you recommend?

Thanks in advance,
Rapidblast
The easiest way would be to just push out the barrel pin and barrel and blue the receiver and trunnions.

The other option would be to degrease and bead blast everything. One tiny speck of cosmoline left behind will leach out and find it's way to the side of your receiver and screw up your finish. It's happened to me a few times.
 

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I'm trying to get a Hot Blueing set-up started, so I'm in touch with a fellow builder that is set up from soup to nutz for Parkerizing.

QUESTION 1:
Can we use his "seasoned" Parkerizing Tanks for Hot Blueing or do we need to get new tanks?

QUESTION 2:
If we need to get new tanks for Hot Blueing, is there a requirement for Black Iron/Carbon Steel or can we use Stainless Tanks if we find them (probably used from food service)?

Thanks in advance!
Rapidblast
 

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Brownells sez only use "black iron" tanks with their salts.

Blindhogg sez use only steel or iron:


Blindhogg custom gunworks

"I may do more experiments with future batches. Steel is the only metal I let come in contact with the salts. I stick to steel or non-reactive materials for everything. I know some people say stainless steel would work fine, but I do not use it for the pot -- some say the pot can be stainless but others say it can affect the results. I find the enamel pots work great and are not that expensive."
 

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Did you read the Kernel's post?

To go more in depth, the answer is no, you probably shouldn't use stainless (although I'm not sure what you mean by "seasoned".)

From Brownell's advisors:
Bluing Salts in the presence of stainless steel and gun steel frequently can create "galvanic" action (electric current flow) between the two dissimilar metals resulting in a "false plate" of either chemicals (streaking the bluing with random iridescent blues/greens/purples) or stainless steel (giving patches of random silver specks/spots).

Black Iron tanks are fairly cheap:
BROWNELLS : BLACK IRON BLUING TANK - World's Largest Supplier of Firearm Accessories, Gun Parts and Gunsmithing Tools
 

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Even if you used steel/iron tanks to parkerize with and "seasoned" them by essentially parking the inside, all that nice zinc or manganese on there will dissolve into the blue mixture and contaminate it.
 

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Thanks Kernelkrink,

That reply closed the loop and answered both of my my questions!

Regards,
Rapidblast

Even if you used steel/iron tanks to parkerize with and "seasoned" them by essentially parking the inside, all that nice zinc or manganese on there will dissolve into the blue mixture and contaminate it.
 

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Hot bluing is something that is just about as dangerous and messing with home made dynamite. 300 degree lye is dangerous as the dickens and unless you take all the safety precautions that the professionals use it too dangerous for me to mess with. I'll stick to parkerizing not nearly as dangerous and the stuff I build should all be parkerized or oxide coated anyway. Bluing is for grandpa's shot gun.
 

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Maybe for grandpas shotgun but also for snazzy east german builds yugos and early milled builds, in my oppinion milled aks just don't look right parked but that's just my opinion.
 

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Hot bluing is something that is just about as dangerous and messing with home made dynamite. 300 degree lye is dangerous as the dickens and unless you take all the safety precautions that the professionals use it too dangerous for me to mess with. I'll stick to parkerizing not nearly as dangerous and the stuff I build should all be parkerized or oxide coated anyway. Bluing is for grandpa's shot gun.

And the sky is falling too? Hot blueing is as safe as parkerizing as long as certain precautions are taken. I admit that the ingredients must be combined in a certain process to minimize reactions but it's not out of reach for anyone. Of course it's caustic and can burn living tissue but knowing that, one understands that covering that tissue negates any harmful quality that hot blueing presents. Don't scare people into thinking that it's a bomb.
 

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While I'm waiting for the Hope & Change (LOL), I've taken up Rust Blueing w/ Brownells "Classic" Rust Blue...

Terrific results so far - and the color is more like "black" than "blue."

Great match for Yugo M64/70/72 original hot blue -
 
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