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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering, are state jobs better than those in the private sector? I may have an oppertunity to get a job at Twin Valley mental hospital, which is run by the state.

I have alway's been told that goverment jobs are better, pay and benifit wise, just wondering if it's true.
 

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There is more security in them and the benefits are usually pretty good. There are drawbacks to working for the state though as it usually means equipment and needed supplies can be an issue.

Let's not forget the lifer types that get those jobs and stay forever while doing very little as well. IMHO
 

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I worked in mental health, both in the private and in the public (i.e. State employment) sector. In mental health, state employment tends to pay better at the lower-level jobs [i.e. if you're a licensed clinician, especially if you're a psychiatrist, you can make more elsewhere] and for all jobs the retirement and medical benefits are better than in the private sector.

So...

As a general rule, in mental health I'd say you're better off working for the State, but that doesn't apply in all industries. Plus, my experience has been that the profit motive inherent to private industry creates some rather difficult ethical issues in mental health, where you are ethically bound to look out more for the patient's best treatment interests than you employers' bottom line.

What would you be doing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am currently a stna( nurses aid)and am told if I apply for the job I would be a basic orderly or an eti whatever that is(eti)

The pay I know is better, about 12-13 dollars an hour, which I only get 10 now. I am also trying to get back into nursing school and am looking for the best benifits possible in regards to paying for it.
 

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As a nurses' aide you definitely are better off working for the State. In the private sector nurses' aides do all the work yet are paid poorly and given lousy benefits. In the State system they're treated and paid much better and given decent medical and retirement benefits.

If/when you get licensed as a nurse, private employment may look more attractive - there is a serious nursing shortage just now, especially for RN's. Note that one of the cool things about working mental health if you're a nurse is that you can often avoid the lousy shift hours that nurses work in med-surge.

I'd definitely work towards getting that nursing license; it will be your meal ticket whether you stay with state employment or not.

Also note that as a nurses' aide you may be able to get on the night shift - which nobody wants, but which is perfect for working your way through school.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"As a nurses' aide you definitely are better off working for the State. In the private sector nurses' aides do all the work yet are paid poorly and given lousy benefits. In the State system they're treated and paid much better and given decent medical and retirement benefits"

Sad thing is the job i'm at now as an aid is the highest paying I can find( private sector at least), most that i've seen are around $8.50 an hour.

Both myself and my fiance are planning on careers in nursing, she is further along than I am in school tho.

I am thinkg about either a state or county job for the benifits, and she was thinking about more along the private sector for potential in higher pay.
 

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Well, whether in the public or in the private sector, in nursing you're going to need a license as your meal ticket in any event. Go for the highest level of licensure you think you can attain. Dunno about where you are, but in Kalifornistan the pecking order for nursing licensure in psych is:

Certified Nurses' Aide (vow poverty required)
Psychiatric Technician (living wage, but you can do better)
Licensed Vocational Nurse - LVN - AKA Low Voltage Nurse
Registered Nurse - RN - AKA Real Nurse

Some go for RN from the gate, others work up the hierarchy, getting each certification/license and then working on the next one. The first strategy gets you to RN quicker, but can leave you with nothing at all if you don't make it.

FYI, the main reason that Psych Techs, LVN's, and RN's can command decent wages in psych is because they can take doctor's orders over the phone so the doc doesn't have to come in to write the order. Without them on staff, it is a collosal pain in the butt for the docs to change a patient's meds. And LVN's and especially RN's are required to be on staff to meet the institution's license and accreditation requirements, so they're in even greater demand.

If I were in your shoes, I'd take the state job, try to get on night shift, and work towards my RN.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We are both going for our LPN's at first, then move on up from there. LPN's in central ohio dont do to bad, job outlook is good and unless your in a hospital pay is decent.
 

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Good luck! Batten down the hatches on your relationship with your lady while you're both working on education and training for licensure.
 

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Klauss,

Sounds like a good idea if you are trting to go back to school. The extra pay will be a big help as I'm sure you already know.

Most 3rd shift jobs pay differential as well and 3rd shift can be very quiet.
 

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klauss said:
Just wondering, are state jobs better than those in the private sector?
I have a state job. My pay is about 3X the average in my area for what I do (not counting medical insurance, guaranteed retirement benefits and other benefits).

I belong to a strong union. The only way I can lose this job is if I screw up SO badly that even the union can't help me.

My days are 7.5 hours... not 8.0, and no overtime, weekends or "on call" crap.

I also get 20 days per year vacation time, 13 days per year paid sick time (which can be used at retirement time to pay the employee's share of continued group-rate medical insurance), plus the standard 12 paid holidays.

Yeah... state jobs are most certainly "worth it"... unless you like playing office politics, sucking up to your boss, calling him "Sir" all the time in the vain hope that you won't be included in the next round of layoffs.

And, RETIRE from a private sector job? BWAHAHAHA!!!! Sure, you'll get a 401(k), the stock market will take (another) dump and there goes your retirement (that is, if you LAST long enough to retire).

The only people who don't have government jobs are those who actually believe the "union = bad" and "public employment = bad" party line. I feel sorry for them.

Roger
 

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SangRun Hunter said:
There are drawbacks to working for the state though as it usually means equipment and needed supplies can be an issue.
We handle equipment shortages easily. If we need it, and someone else has it, and it's not nailed down, we take it.

Not theft for home, of course, but equipment for the job.

Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow had to go far back just for a 3 day old thread.


Pick up the application today, no place for refrences which I thought was odd. Anyone trying to make myself sound good, any ideas on how. I haven't been an STNA for long, about a 1 1/2 years.


Dzerzhinsky is there any advice you can give me on this seeing you have worked in the field before?

I did pass a test of sorts today when I picked it up, asked for my name when I answered a question correctly. So hopefully I left a good impression.
 

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I worked at a prison for eight years. Some employees took advantage of the fact that it is almost impossible to fire them and used the opportunity to be as lazy and mean-spirited as possible. Other employees were exemplary.

The pay was slightly lower than the private sector, and they slice off a huge chunk of your pay to put into your retirement and bennies.

I could barely make ends meet, but the security of knowing it was hard for them to get rid of me and the retirement program made up for it to a certain extent.

It all comes down to: would you rather make more money in your paycheck every two weeks (private sector), or would you rather have long-term security (state job)?
 
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