Gunco Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,063 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well My Great Uncle passed away last night..
Right before Thanksgiving he was having terrible stomach pain and after weeks of taking Pepto and Rolaids he finally agreed to going to the hospital. He went to the hospital and was diagnosed with stomach cancer...that had already spread to his kidneys and liver.
After a month plus of hospitalization, he finally skipped town to places elsewhere.

He was 93.

We had hoped to visit in April, I wanted my wife to meet him.
He was a cool guy; really quiet and kind. Imagine a 5'6" brown wrinkly ancient ***** with bright sapphire blue eyes. He lived to see his defeated people grow from under the bootheel of conquest to thriving prosperity.

The Cupeno

The word Cupeno is of Spanish derivation, adopting the native place-name Kupa and appending Spanish - 'eno' to mean a person who lives in or hails from Kupa.* The Cupenos, however, called themselves Kuupangaxwichem, or "people who slept here."

The Cupans were one of the smallest native American tribes in Southern California.* It is unlikely that they ever numbered more than 1000 in size.* They once occupied a territory 10 square miles in diameter in a mountainous region at the headwaters of the San Luis Rey River in the valley of San Jose de Valle.* Many of the Pala Indians trace their heritage back to Cupa.* Today, more than 90 years after having been expelled from their native homeland, the Cupenos call Pala, California home and live as one among the Luiseno tribe.


Outsiders


Before 1810, the Cupans had very little contact with outsiders --- Spanish or otherwise.* The land they had lived on for countless generations, including the medicinal hot springs and the village called Cupa now is controlled and used to the exclusion of the Cupans by Americans who displaced them. * As the Spanish, Mexicans and, later, the American trailblazers grew in number in the region, the Cupans began to work in serf-like relations to the new-comers.

Discontent quickly spread among the Cupans.* The pioneers who trekked West through the southern route did so on a trail that ran directly through the Cupan territory.* To add insult to injury, American officials in San Diego concluded that a reasonable source of revenue would be a taxation upon the Indians of the back country.* The Cupans were assessed a $600 tax that with great resentment was finally paid by the villagers.

Tensions mounted and shortly after California was made a state in 1848, a Cupeno Net named Antonio Garra attempted to unite Southern Californian Indians against all foreigners by organizing a revolt.* Garra, his son and a renegade American sailor were able to unify many of the Indian tribes of the region.* But just moments before a grand attack was to commence, a pro-American chief leading the Cahuilla tribe opted out of the coalition to sue for peace.* This dissolution of unity was Garra's undoing and within days, Garra was executed and the village of Cupa was burned.

Expulsion


By the late 1800's the hot sulfur springs found on the Cupa territories were becoming very popular and attracting visitors from Los Angeles and San Diego.* The popularity of the destination and the growing California population began the events which ultimately led to the expulsion of the Cupans from their homeland.

Four years after California became a state, a land survey commission was formed, and cattleman Juan Jose Warner claimed 47,500 acres of what is now Warner Springs.* Warner Springs makes up the majority of the Cupan homeland.* The property was later purchased by former California Governor John Downey in 1880.* Downey then filed a lawsuit --- later pursued by his heirs after his death --- claiming title to the land and demanding eviction of the Cupenos from the property.* The Cupas argued before the courts that Mexican law, as well as the peace treaty that ended the war between Mexico and the United States, ensured Indian rights and precluded the hostile takeover of their land.* They argued to no avail.* The California courts agreed with Downey and in 1901 the United States Supreme Court affirmed the judgment ordering removal of the Indians.

President Rutherford Hayes, prompted by the Supreme Court holding, declared the Indians "trespassers" and ordered the tribe relocated to Pala, California, just beyond the Palomar Mountains where a 10,000-acre reservation had been established.* Pala was a Luiseno reservation then, not Cupa. * This act marked the first time in U.S. history that two distinct Indian tribes were herded together in one reservation.* This was a blemish upon a nation that prided itself on leading the world into the 20th Century and the cultural and political renaissance that accompanied such a transition.

On the morning of May 12, 1903, Indian Bureau agent James Jenkins arrived with 44 armed teamsters to carry out the eviction.* Rosinda Nolasquez --- survivor of the expulsion --- later testified that "Many carts stood there by the doors.* People came from La Mesa, from Santa Ysabel, from Wilakal, from San Ignacio ... to see their relatives.* They cried a lot.* And they just threw our belongings, our clothes, into carts ..."

The 40-mile journey from Cupa to Pala took three days.* The Cupenos call it their "Trail of Tears."
So now I just booked airfare to go back to the reservation for his funeral.
I had hoped I wouldn't have to travel this holiday after spending last December putting my wife's grandfather into Arlington Cemetary with full parade, marching band, horse, caisson, 21 gun salute, and services, along with all the dysfunction of a family I was unfamiliar with.
But life's what happens when you make plans.

I'll be back on the 22nd.

On another note--Now I have to call the gunshop and tell them that I won't be in to take delivery of my newest aquisition for a few days after the scheduled pick-up date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
You have my condolances. I'm sorry to hear about your loss. I know exactly what you meant when you said "But life's what happens when you make plans". I recently lost my favorite aunt and I'd planned an impromptu visit between Thanksgiving and Christmas because the family has grown and we don't all get together the way we used to. Only a tad older than my mother, she was a constant reminder of simpler times, a wonderful human being.

Sounds as though your Great Uncle was a man you admired. Take care and be safe in your travels.

edited to add: Thanks for posting the history of the Cupeno! I'd never heard their story before and I'm glad I have even though it came through adverse news. Certainly a noble people and a quite interesting lineage that I'm sure you're proud to be a part of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Sorry for your loss D.B.
Never a good time for these things but at Christmas it really hurts, as sadly I know.
Sounds like your Great Uncle had a full life, 93 years is a long time.
I wish him well in the spirit world, some day we will hear his stories. I have some Cherokee lineage and plan to hear the stories of my ancestors too.
Safe travel and peace to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
770 Posts
Sorry about your great uncle DB. Take care of your business, and we'll see you back here soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
I'll build a large pine smoke for him. My condolances Bro.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,233 Posts
My condolances DB.
 

·
DADDY WARBUCKS
Joined
·
19,433 Posts
Sorry to hear this but many thanks for the story of this fine man and his people.
 

·
Friend of MCMXI
Joined
·
8,717 Posts
Hang in there DB, we're all thinking about you and your family
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,334 Posts
Take care D.B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Sorry to hear that DB. His journey has just begun, and the sun is shining and his trail is now always smooth.
Try to keep your temper with the TSA goons when being strip searched and remember, it's best to just lie back and enjoy the body cavity search. Struggling just makes it take longer. :scared:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Sorry to hear about your loss D.B. At least in one way, it was good, he didn't suffer too long. Too many people I've heard about suffered for years because of that damned disease. It sounds like he had a good run....

My grandfather died a couple of days after Thanksgiving this year, but this was after he had been pretty much house bound and sick for a couple of years. He was 92, and we looked at it as a bit of a relief. He certainly wasn't happy being like that, he was always active and liked puttering around fixing stuff. He was a mechanical genius, and I learned tons of stuff from him since I was just a little kid. It sucks that all the old great ones are going....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,413 Posts
Sorry to hear D.B.

At least he went quick and didn't have to sit in a home. My Grandfather turned 96 this year and had to be put in a home. Grandma couldn't take are of hell because he was falling all the time and he hit his head really bad the last time.

he got his bell rung and lost some of his memory for a few. He's recovered now, but can't really stand at all.

I feel so bad for him because I would hate to be in a home myself.
 

·
Gunco Irregular
Joined
·
4,323 Posts
D.B. I'm sorry about your loss. This is a hard time to lose loved ones and it seems like many leave us near the holidays.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top