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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hope this is in the right area... admin please move it if necessary.

Anyway...

I have noticed that if I shoot indoors (at a range) and there are a lot of other people there (i.e. lots of smoke) and then I clean the weapon(s) at home later that night, I USUALLY will feel ill the next morning.

By "ill" I mean slight naseua, tiredness and BAD dizziness. If I try to walk... I stagger like a drunk. If I look at a fixed object, my eyes drift left, then snap back, then drift, then snap back...

The only thing I use to clean my weapons that's not ordinary oil or other benign chemical is Hoppes #9.

It seems like BOTH lots of smoke AND cleaning with Hoppes #9 TOGETHER are needed to make me sick. Either one by itself doesn't bother me.

Does this happen to anyone else? If so, is there a solution to the problem?

Thanks

Roger
 

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Krupski said:
Does this happen to anyone else? If so, is there a solution to the problem?

Thanks

Roger
Shoot outdoors OR put off cleaning for one day????:dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DorGunR said:
Shoot outdoors OR put off cleaning for one day????:dunno:
Well, I usually do put off cleaning for a day or two just to prevent this from happening (with the exception of running an oily patch down the bore to prevent corrosion).

Shooting outdoors is quite difficult where I live. There are very few outdoor ranges, and due to "noise ordnances" usually only .22 is allowed.

Speaking of noise... it's funny that many countries REQUIRE people to use silencers when shooting outdoors to minimize the noise, but in America it's a felony to use one without all the permit and tax crap. :rolleyes:

Roger
 

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I know plenty of people who have gotten sick from shooting old ammo.
There used to be mercury and lead and some other nasty stuff in primers and military powder mixtures.
I have been lead poisoned before and I can tell you it's something to be taken very seriously.
 

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Does shooting and cleaning make YOU sick?
Nope, cures whatever is making me feel bad.
 

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Only time I got sick was when I shot about a 150 rounds of NATO 762 through my CETME in a two lane indoor range. My chest hurt for days. Silly me.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Roger, I have never gotten sick from shooting but I have from cleaning after shooting. I shoot outdoors 99% of the time and when I do shoot indoors it is only for 1/2 hour or so.

I think the stuff I use to clean (like Ed's Red) soaks into my skin and under my nails and I am ingesting the stuff. No matter how hard I try, the other stuff like Hoppes and various oils get on my hands, too.

I clean my guns in the garage, near the doors with them both open so I don't think it is fumes.

In the last year, I have tried to use surgical gloves...helps a bit but what seems to help the most is keeping a plastic bucket of hot water and kitchen soap and washing my hands in it very frequently as I am cleaning.

I do the same thing when I am cleaning new milsurps loaded with cosmo and worse.
 

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Custer, I think your point about the gloves is good. I got a box from Enco and use them all the time. You can never tell what certain chemicals can do. Stupidly, I was useing MEK and taking no precautions. Sam gave me the low down on the stuff, I take a lot more care now.
 

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Krupski...Custer....have ya'll ever had jobs that required you to work with/around any chemicals or petroleum products? Also, isn't shooting indoors suppose to put lead/copper vapors in the air from when the bullets vaporize against the backstop? Does the indoor range have a ventilation system?
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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N/A said:
Krupski...Custer....have ya'll ever had jobs that required you to work with/around any chemicals or petroleum products? Also, isn't shooting indoors suppose to put lead/copper vapors in the air from when the bullets vaporize against the backstop? Does the indoor range have a ventilation system?
Been around OSHA/EPA issues most of my adult life due to manufacturing so I have some experience with that. Your biggest danger often is at home, not at work.

The indoor range I used to shoot at frequently has great ventilation. My limited indoor sessions are more of a product of boredom.
 

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The reason I asked, is because while in the army, working on helicopters, we would have to change out the fuel cells every now and then. We didn't have exactly good working conditions so it was drain the fuel out on the ground and then lie on the fuel soaked ground to remove some of the panels and sometimes the fuel cell. This was while I was on night crew, and you would usually spend the night in jungle fatigues soak in JP-4...high grade kerosene. Also the same was true with working on the hydraulic system,...one would often spend the night soaked with hydraulic fluid.
To this day, i only have to smell the fumes from oil based paints, solvents or cabinet finishes to breakout like I have cold sores. Also working on greasy motors/parts does the same thing.

If you have had to spend a lot of time just being around chemicals/petroleum you might have built up an allergy to it that makes you sick when you work with cleaning compunds...

....or maybe not?
 

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I don't know that the vapors of Hoppes #9 are especially toxic - it's not especially volatile. Mostly it's just kerosene with that cool scent added. Although even then you should clean your weapons in a well-ventillated area. Wondering: Do you notice this mostly in the winter, when it's cold outside so you're least likely to have a door open to ventilate your house?


PS Unless you're into target shooting (in which an AK would be a rather silly weapon to choose), too bad you've gotta shoot in an indoor range. My favorite shooting is driving back the onslaught of the hordes of tin cans trying to take over the desert.
 

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N/A said:
The reason I asked, is because while in the army, working on helicopters
Hey. I was one of those too!
I was a Turboshaft Complete Engine repair tech in the Marines. CH-46's, CH-53's and Twin Pak Hueys.
I don't know about the JP4, but I do know the synthetic oil they used has ruined my ability to keep calluses on my hands. They form, then peel off in a day or two.
 

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Krupski said:
Hope this is in the right area... admin please move it if necessary.

Anyway...

I have noticed that if I shoot indoors (at a range) and there are a lot of other people there (i.e. lots of smoke) and then I clean the weapon(s) at home later that night, I USUALLY will feel ill the next morning.

By "ill" I mean slight naseua, tiredness and BAD dizziness. If I try to walk... I stagger like a drunk. If I look at a fixed object, my eyes drift left, then snap back, then drift, then snap back...

The only thing I use to clean my weapons that's not ordinary oil or other benign chemical is Hoppes #9.

It seems like BOTH lots of smoke AND cleaning with Hoppes #9 TOGETHER are needed to make me sick. Either one by itself doesn't bother me.

Does this happen to anyone else? If so, is there a solution to the problem?

Thanks

Roger
Sounds like what I have when I eat to much salt, althought I also have ringing in the .ears and that weird pressure feeling as well
 
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