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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well after spending hours of time this weekend working on the rear trunnion rivets, I figured this would probably be a topic that would have been adressed a couple of times. Guess not.Maybe it's on my end....Here's what I did. Sorry for the "book". Just want to make sure you guys know what exactly I was doing.

I'm working on an AMD-63 and was succesful in getting out all of the front trunnions and then started on the rear. Lined up drill bit in the middle of hole that contains the rivet in the rear trunnion. Proceeded with a very small bit and began to drill through hole with a drill press. Got about half way and I started breaking bits off(nitride tipped) inside after applying to much pressure. Moved up a couple of sizes and got to the same depth. Moved up another size or so and then tried with some oil and going really slow with same bits and wasn't making any progress in getting deeper, just dulling the tips and chipping the sharp edges of the bit. Proceeded to start from other side and connect to previous hole. I got only about 1/4 of the way through and ran into the same problem as before. Went to Lowes and bought a $3.00 "cobalt" bit that is supposedly specifically for metal. In the mean time, somehow I "shattered" the key used to tighten the chuck on my new Harbor Freight 8'' drill press. Somehow when I was tightening a drill bit it just shattered in my hands. So, I resorted to using the hand drill. In the beginning with the new Cobalt bit, I was able to remove some material (lots more than with the other bits), but less than a minute or so into it, I stop moving and little material is then removed with extensive force.Last attempt was with the dremel. I know it is easier to damage the trunnion with the dremel, but I needed something that had a sharp tip and had high RPM's. I attached a bit that looked like it was for boring in metal or tile and removed quite a bit more material but it soon dulled. I am my wit's end with this da** rivet in the rear trunnion not to mention I have another one to go! Any suggestions or expertise would be GREATLY appreciated!
 

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I found after ya drill some of the rivet out you can hit them with a punch and they come out pretty easy...Just my experience...Oops that is for the front my bad
 

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When I removed the rear trunnion rivets from my AMD-63 (2 long rivets) kit, I only drilled half way through (started with a small drill and worked up) then rotated the trunnion and drilled the other side. Used standard HSS drill bit (RPM 550, feed rate very slow with oil) and I had no problems, in fact I posted about my success on this site (General Home Builders Lobby, Page 5, AMD-63 Rear Trunnion Rivets, tells how I did it). After hearing other people were having trouble I felt pretty good about doing a good job on it. No damage to the trunnion or drill bit.

If you have only started drilling from the one side you might be in luck. I would start to drill from the oppisite side and before hitting the broken drill bit I would change to a solid carbied cutter, the kind made for the dremel tool (kinda expensive $6 - $8, but man do they cut metal). I would chuck that into the drill press and continue until I hit the broken drill bit. Both the cutter and rear trunnion must be held very tight during this process, you want to go very slow while doing this. After hitting the other drill bit, I would then try to use a hardened punch to pop out the broken bit. You must be very careful with the carbied cutter as it will go through the trunnion metal like butter. Remember you only want to remove the rivet not damage any surounding metal.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Toten Kopf said:
When I removed the rear trunnion rivets from my AMD-63 (2 long rivets) kit, I only drilled half way through (started with a small drill and worked up) then rotated the trunnion and drilled the other side. Used standard HSS drill bit (RPM 550, feed rate very slow with oil) and I had no problems, in fact I posted about my success on this site (General Home Builders Lobby, Page 5, AMD-63 Rear Trunnion Rivets, tells how I did it). After hearing other people were having trouble I felt pretty good about doing a good job on it. No damage to the trunnion or drill bit.

If you have only started drilling from the one side you might be in luck. I would start to drill from the oppisite side and before hitting the broken drill bit I would change to a solid carbied cutter, the kind made for the dremel tool (kinda expensive $6 - $8, but man do they cut metal). I would chuck that into the drill press and continue until I hit the broken drill bit. Both the cutter and rear trunnion must be held very tight during this process, you want to go very slow while doing this. After hitting the other drill bit, I would then try to use a hardened punch to pop out the broken bit. You must be very careful with the carbied cutter as it will go through the trunnion metal like butter. Remember you only want to remove the rivet not damage any surounding metal.

Hope this helps.

I must have missed your post when I searched. Actually, when I broke the bits off, I am almost 100% sure that I got them out either by smashing them with a punch or they just fell out afterwards. I don't really think the issue is that there is a bit stuck in the hole. If I hold the trunnion in the light just right, I can actually see the silver surface of the rivet that I'm drilling into on both sides. I did start on the other side and the same thing happened that did on the first. Like you other guys mentioned, I tried to push it out with a punch too! I ended up snapping 2 Craftsmen 3/32 punches. Any suggestions on a stronger punch? Last, can I get the "solid carbied punch" from most any place like Home Depot or Lowes? What size would you suggest?

Something like this?

http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=73390-000055929-9901
 

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yosuthnmasa said:
Well after spending hours of time this weekend working on the rear trunnion rivets, I figured this would probably be a topic that would have been adressed a couple of times. Guess not.Maybe it's on my end....<snip> I am my wit's end with this da** rivet in the rear trunnion not to mention I have another one to go! Any suggestions or expertise would be GREATLY appreciated!
FWIW, I have had some success using the drill bits from a craftman tap set ( #21 I think ). On my AMD 65 #1 I drill part of the way through, then put a punch in ( most of the punch was in the hole, so it was kind of supported ) then beat the snot out of it with a 4 lb mini sledge. Once about 1/4 inch of the rivet was out, I grabbed it with vice grips and twist/pulled it out.- used a Dewalt hand drill

For AMD 65# I drilled all the way through, then part of the way through with a slightyl larger bit ( at work right now, so can't go look at what I used ). I thin made a tapered pin out of a old mauser cleaning rod, and out came the hammer and vice grips.- holes made with Harbor Freight 8 inch drill press.

Is it possible that your drill bit got a little of center and is biting into the trunnion, which is a bit harder than the rivet ( and that is what makes it snap)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I finally got out both of the rivets from the rear trunnion. I had previously removed almost all of the material from both sides but could not get all the way through. What I did, was bent over the edges that could be reached with a punch on ends of the hole. Then I hammered them flat so the holes were completely closed. Next, I drilled through all of this material and kept doing it until all of the existing material that I could see around the edges was removed from both ends. Then, I clamped it down in the vice like I had done so many times before and hammered it out. It actually came out pretty easily. After getting it out and looking at it, I saw what my problem was. I had drilled a very slight angle and it had ran into the side which would clip the edges of the bits and also dull their tips so I couldn't go any deeper. I only had about 1/16'' of an inch to go but the edges around the tops of the holes were keeping the entire piece of rivet snug in the holes. After I broke loose the tops,it came right out. After getting this one out, I moved to the othe rivet. It suprisingly came out pretty easily. I actually made it all of the way through with the first small drill bit. I basically did the same thing as the first and barely ran against the side, but as soon as I heard the bit "squeeling" I repositioned it a little in the hole so that it would't dull the head and chip the sides. I think what made it alot easier was the fact, that the bit was alot smaller and was more pliable when I needed to reposition the angle of the hole after I ran into the side. I also found that drilling was alot easier and faster when I added a little bit of motor oil to the hole when things seemed to slow down. I certainly learned alot from these 2 rivets! I appreciate all of the advice and help in this one. I sure wish there was an easier way to get these things out when you do run into the side of the hole. Anyone have any luck pressing the rivets out, without drilling any of it out? Wonder if you could take a 1/4'' plate and make a square hole in it to place the trunnion and then drill about 1/4 of the way through, insert a punch or rod and push the whole thing out?
 

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yosuthnmasa.....

Congratulations!!!!!
You have now joined the "These damn little rivets aren't going to beat me club". Now you have a war story to tell when someone else runs into the same problem.

Good work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Toten Kopf! Believe it or not, I really do feel like I've achieved a great feat. That may be said, but I sure had a helluva time with that rivet. Looking at my work table, I broke two 3/32 punches and 6 drill bits!
 

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fools rush in

I have followed this thread thinking "I don't remember them as being that bad".

So I decided this afternoon to knock a couple of rivets out of a '65 trunnion. I had supported it in a 70 lb. Kurtz vice,on a Bridgeport milling machine and was using high speed steel tin coated bits.

I broke two bits and that five-minute operation took several hours.

No wonder Global sold every rear trunnion they could get their hands on so we wouldn't have to do this.

I'm making a couple of pistols-- no stock-- have come to the conclusion it's easier to mill the rear trunnion from scratch than it is to get the folder hinge and two rivets out of the AMD.:scared:

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I'm not the only one out there that had a problem with the rear trunnion rivets! Sorry to hear about your episode with the AMD-65 Winn. I know how you feel.

edit for spelling
 

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yosuthnmasa said:
Thanks Toten Kopf! Believe it or not, I really do feel like I've achieved a great feat. That may be said, but I sure had a helluva time with that rivet. Looking at my work table, I broke two 3/32 punches and 6 drill bits!
But I'm sure that the finished job was well worth the price of the tools....Again, good job.
 
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