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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is virtually every county with any significant population.

I am sure these regulators will be in our wallets, homes and lives.




EPA Names Ohio Counties That Do Not Meet New, Health-Based Soot Standard

12/17/2004 2:36:00 PM


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To: State Desk

Contact: William Omohundro of the Environmental Protection Agency, 312-353-8254

CHICAGO, Dec. 17 /U.S. Newswire/ -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said today that 28 Ohio counties and parts of four other counties in the state do not meet the new, health- based outdoor air quality standard for fine particles (soot).

The counties are: Stark, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, Warren, Cuyahoga, Lake, Lorain, Medina, Portage, Summit, Delaware, Fairfield, Franklin, Licking, Clark, Greene, Montgomery, Lawrence, Scioto, Washington, Jefferson, Lucas, Wood, Belmont, Columbiana, Mahoning, Trumbull and parts of Ashtabula, Coshocton, Adams and Gallia.

"I think of our clean air history as a relay where a baton is passed from generation to generation and from Administration to Administration. This Administration has made a commitment to accelerate our clean air progress so that all Americans live healthier, longer, more productive and prosperous lives," said EPA Administrator Mike Leavitt in a letter to Gov. Bob Taft.

"We take the first of those important steps today, identifying the areas in your state that do not meet the fine particle standards. Those parts of your state will require more actions to achieve a common goal of cleaner, healthier air," Leavitt said.

The counties failing to meet the new standard, called nonattainment areas, have or contribute to, fine particle levels higher than allowed under EPA's national air quality standard. The standard is designed to protect the public from exposure to these tiny particles that are 2.5 microns or smaller, or about 1/30th the size of a human hair.

Today's designations start a planning process for states to identify measures needed to meet the health standard. EPA will be working with the states and others to achieve this clean-air goal.

Fine particles have been associated with a range of serious adverse health effects, including aggravation of lung disease, asthma attacks and heart problems. EPA believes that airborne fine particles cause tens of thousands of premature deaths across the United States each year. In addition, exposure to fine particles results in tens of thousands of hospitalizations as well as millions of sick days and doctor visits.

More information is at http://www.epa.gov/pmdesignations.
 

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Whoop de doodle. Note that there isn't diddly-squat said about doing any enforcement. The EPA has been a paper tiger for many years.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
EPA Names Michigan Counties That Do Not Meet New, Health-Based Soot Standard

12/17/2004 2:34:00 PM


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To: State Desk

Contact: William Omohundro of the Environmental Protection Agency, 312-353-8254

CHICAGO, Dec. 17 /U.S. Newswire/ -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said today that seven Michigan counties do not meet the new, health-based outdoor air quality standard for fine particles (soot).

The counties are: Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw and Wayne.

"I think of our clean air history as a relay where a baton is passed from generation to generation and from Administration to Administration. This Administration has made a commitment to accelerate our clean air progress so that all Americans can live healthier, longer, more productive and prosperous lives," said EPA Administrator Mike Leavitt in a letter to Gov. Jennifer Granholm.

"We take the first of those important steps today, identifying the areas in your state that do not meet the fine particle standards. Those parts of your state will require more actions to achieve a common goal of cleaner, healthier air," Leavitt said.

The counties failing to meet the new standard, called nonattainment areas, have or contribute to fine particle levels higher than allowed under EPA's national air quality standard. The standard is designed to protect the public from exposure to these tiny particles that are 2.5 microns or smaller, or about 1/30th the size of a human hair.

Today's designations start a planning process for states to identify measures needed to meet the health standard. EPA will be working with the states and others to achieve this clean-air goal.

Fine particles have been associated with a range of serious adverse health effects, including aggravation of lung disease, asthma attacks and heart problems. EPA believes that airborne fine particles cause tens of thousands of premature deaths across the United States each year. In addition, exposure to fine particles results in tens of thousands of hospitalizations as well as millions of sick days and doctor visits.

More information is at http://www.epa.gov/pmdesignations.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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19,433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
EPA Names Indiana Counties That Do Not Meet New, Health-Based Soot Standard

12/17/2004 3:41:00 PM


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To: State Desk

Contact: William Omohundro of the Environmental Protection Agency, 312-353-8254

CHICAGO, Dec. 17 /U.S. Newswire/ -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said today that 14 Indiana counties and parts of five other counties in the state do not meet the new, health- based outdoor air quality standard for fine particles (soot).

The counties are: Lake, Porter, Elkhart, St. Joseph, Vanderburgh, Warrick, Hamilton, Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, Morgan, Dubois, Clark, Floyd and parts of Dearborn, Gibson, Pike, Spencer and Jefferson.

"I think of our clean air history as a relay where a baton is passed from generation to generation and from Administration to Administration. This Administration has made a commitment to accelerate our clean air progress so that all Americans live healthier, longer, more productive and prosperous lives," said EPA Administrator Mike Leavitt in a letter to Gov. Joseph Kernan.

"We take the first of those important steps today, identifying the areas in your state that do not meet the fine particle standards. Those parts of your state will require more actions to achieve a common goal of cleaner, healthier air," Leavitt said.

The counties failing to meet the new standard, called nonattainment areas, have or contribute to fine particle levels higher than allowed under EPA's national air quality standard. The standard is designed to protect the public from exposure to these tiny particles that are 2.5 microns or smaller, or about 1/30th the size of a human hair.

Today's designations start a planning process for states to identify measures needed to meet the health standard. EPA will be working with the states and others to achieve this clean-air goal.

Fine particles have been associated with a range of serious adverse health effects, including aggravation of lung disease, asthma attacks and heart problems. EPA believes that airborne fine particles cause tens of thousands of premature deaths across the United States each year. In addition, exposure to fine particles results in tens of thousands of hospitalizations as well as millions of sick days and doctor visits.

More information is at http://www.epa.gov/pmdesignations.
 

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Custer said:
Yeah, I bet you deal a lot with the EPA, Smeg.
Not really. So far they have completely ignored the toxic waste from my meth lab.

On a more serious note...

They're pretty notorious here in Nevada for turning a blind eye to toxic waste from the mines and to depletion of purportedly-protected wetlands.
 

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They will find a way to rip us off over this. The E-check here is a scam, I knew the guys that was a project manager when they were setup. Basically the machines did not work right and the owners were scamming everyone involved. He quit in disgust after he tried to blow the whistle.

meanwhile studies showed that the E-check had less then 3% effect in the Ohio valley. Even the the EPA stated the pollution problems here was the industrial community and heavy trucks.

It's all a scam on the lowly tax payers while indutrial companies get credits for crushing a bunch of cars.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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19,433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Dzerzhinsky said:
Not really. So far they have completely ignored the toxic waste from my meth lab.

On a more serious note...

They're pretty notorious here in Nevada for turning a blind eye to toxic waste from the mines and to depletion of purportedly-protected wetlands.
Well known to whom? I had two Nevada mines under my jurisidiction and we spent millions to keep them in compliance.

I have had the same experience everywhere else, too.

Ever go through an EPA audit?
 

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Master Endmill Breaker
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Custer said:
Well known to whom? I had two Nevada mines under my jurisidiction and we spent millions to keep them in compliance.

I have had the same experience everywhere else, too.

Ever go through an EPA audit?
We go through an EPA audit every year, it's part of the Industrial Pretreatment Program. Our district Pretreatment Coordinator usually spends 2 to 3 days on the audit.

We've worked with the OEPA Criminal Investigations unit on several occasions. There's nothing like setting samplers at 2:00 am in 20 degree weather. We've also been present during the "serving of a warrant" at 2 of our industrial users. It's a different feeling working with JBTs. The Criminal Investigations is frighteningly efficient in dealing with records and paperwork.
 
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