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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gents,
I need your help in order to find out the best way to extract oil and grease from milsurp furniture before I refinish it. I want to prevent the "weeping" that occurs when the wood handguards heat up and the old oil and grease bubble up and melt through the new shellac finish I apply.
Thanks,
Johnny.
 

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I acetone the wood with old rags and fine steel wool several times and using a heat lamp or the natural sunlight with the stock wrapped up in newspaper and place in the window sill. I find the heat lamp is better (no need to wrap it in newspaer) because I can control the areas I need to concentrate on like the grip area.
Also have a old flea market Iron and old washcloths or towels( lightly wet the towel apply the iron to the wet area to raise the dent) to raise dents and steam out more oil but don't go crazy
all old military stocks we coated with linseed oil, I used a mixture of original linseed oil and a little bit of beeswax, this duplicates orignal miltary finishes

don't use the diswasher, oven cleaner, bleach, or sand paper

sprat
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I acetone the wood with old rags and fine steel wool several times and using a heat lamp or the natural sunlight with the stock wrapped up in newspaper and place in the window sill. I find the heat lamp is better (no need to wrap it in newspaer) because I can control the areas I need to concentrate on like the grip area.
Also have a old flea market Iron and old washcloths or towels( lightly wet the towel apply the iron to the wet area to raise the dent) to raise dents and steam out more oil but don't go crazy
all old military stocks we coated with linseed oil, I used a mixture of original linseed oil and a little bit of beeswax, this duplicates orignal miltary finishes

don't use the diswasher, oven cleaner, bleach, or sand paper

sprat

Thank you.
 

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Sprat, why not oven cleaner. I've used it after removing all the metal parts from the stock.
Please don't tell me it's going to turn into sawdust in 5 years....
 

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The stuff really tears metal up. After stripping all metal from the wood I sprayed it on and scrubbed with a green scotchbright and then a terry cloth towel followed by rinsing thoroughly with a garden hose. After drying for a day or two, the wood was completely smooth and free of any of it's original finish. The scotchbright knocked the raised grain off without removing any of the stocks profile. I read Sprats relpy and now I'm beginning to wonder.
This was an old oil rubbed finish,
I've found alcohol to work well on most AKs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The stuff really tears metal up. After stripping all metal from the wood I sprayed it on and scrubbed with a green scotchbright and then a terry cloth towel followed by rinsing thoroughly with a garden hose. After drying for a day or two, the wood was completely smooth and free of any of it's original finish. The scotchbright knocked the raised grain off without removing any of the stocks profile. I read Sprats relpy and now I'm beginning to wonder.
This was an old oil rubbed finish,
I've found alcohol to work well on most AKs.

Thanks for the info. What I've done in the past is scrub the wood with soapy water and then let it air dry. I then wrapped the wood in paper towels (with rubberbands) and placed it in a black trash bag. I left the bag in the sun for several hours. This seemed to work, but I wasn't able to test fire the finished furniture afterwards so I don't know if any weeping occurred. I'd love to find out other, tested methods.

Thanks guys.
 

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The stuff really tears metal up. After stripping all metal from the wood I sprayed it on and scrubbed with a green scotchbright and then a terry cloth towel followed by rinsing thoroughly with a garden hose. After drying for a day or two, the wood was completely smooth and free of any of it's original finish. The scotchbright knocked the raised grain off without removing any of the stocks profile. I read Sprats relpy and now I'm beginning to wonder.
This was an old oil rubbed finish,
I've found alcohol to work well on most AKs.
tanvil
what are you wondering about????, oven cleaner is suppose weaken the wood . I used it once on a old enfield cosmoline stock, no it has not turned to saw dust, but after reading others post in the past 15 years since I did the enfield stock. the concensus seems to go without oven cleaner

the advice I gave above is conservative and works

sprat
 

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I had some k98 stocks that were totally soaked in cosmoline (dripping) and ran them through the parts washer (fresh fluid) first then stuff thats called prepsol, thats the brand name, it's thinner thats used to wipe down a car with just before you tack rag it and paint it. It drys slower than actone and pulls out more oil, after drying overnight do the acetone and finish/sand as wanted. But they were really soaked with cosmo and it cleaned them perfectly. The heat/ sunshine is a good call to get ride of all traces of thinners and oils. I'd avoid the stove/oven cleaner though, that's what I use for stripping blueing before polishing a part, don't think I'd want to chance it leaching out of a stock when reassembled and being warmed up from shooting allot, pretty caustic stuff. The boiling in water , especally on a laminated stock/guard, works but that can cause a stock to split, or delaminate. Not all laminated stocks are glued up with synthitic glues so it's a kinda last resort/chancey method. But also remember that acetone WILL attack synthetic glues, so be carefull there too. Paint prep type thinners won't attack eaither one. Just take longer to dry, a day in the sun.
 

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Here's how wood that looked like typical Yugo milsurp before, looks after a somewhat radical method

http://www.gunco.net/forums/643585-post6.html
I am with SJohnson on this method. BUT, every piece of wood is different. I have used variations of the methods listed in the above posts.

I agree with NOT using oven Cleaner. The simple reason is that I have no sure way to neutralize the stuff that soaks into the wood. Acetone and thinner are easy to clean off, and if a residue is left, who cares. It blends in with the Linseed oil, danish oil, teak oil, etc.

On one REALLY saturated SMLE stock, I literally boiled it in hot water, and skimmed the snarfy stuff off of the top. I then soaked it in thinner, and wiped it down with acetone. Air dry in the sunlight, and a final wipe down with thinner. Came out great....Used Danish oil on that one....
 

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...
BUT, every piece of wood is different. I have used variations of the methods listed in the above posts.
...
Every piece is different is a perfect statement regarding the cleaning of old wood.

Get to "know" the wood presenting you with problems, find out what works and you'll end up pleased. Take your time, and even revisit the problem if what you have done isn't pleasing you.
 

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Every piece is different is a perfect statement regarding the cleaning of old wood.

Get to "know" the wood presenting you with problems, find out what works and you'll end up pleased. Take your time, and even revisit the problem if what you have done isn't pleasing you.
Sage advise Mr Johnson....This is one to write down and refer back to often...Add it to your Books of Lore boys and girls...
 
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