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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Romak 111 and I have been fireing Wolf 200 gr. it is very accurate with it so far. Now I am going to buy a large quantity of ammo for it and I want the proper grain bullet.
I am told too heavy bullet may plow up the barrel and not turn well in the rifeling, if the rifeling turns are too fast.
Also I am told if the rifeling turns too slow then a light weight bullet may tumbel. because it is not spinning fast enough.
Wolf offers 200 gr and 146 gr. how do I know before I have a bunch of the wrong stuff. HELP
 

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There are several deciding factors... the distance expected to shoot, rifle twist rate, desired terminal charactaristics (what happens to the bullet on impact), and barrel length, amoung others.

I would try to find out the twist rate, then the ballistic coefficient of a bullet candidate, then go from there. you are correct, to a point, that smaller weight bullets handle higher twist rates better, but it could depend on barrel length and charge behind it, as well as bullet construction and shape. You could get yourself a reloading press and some dies, and experiment, but this might be a costly venture; however, you could make up some tackdriving loads for that nice ROMAK!!!

it all depends on what you want... cheap shootin, or exacting performance.:rockin:

P.S.
A dab of Moly Paste swabbed in your barrel after a good scrubbing will help maintain your accuracy, and it will be easier to clean after shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am going to choise between wolf 200gr and wolf 148gr. As for the technical info on the gun or the ammo . I do not know, the twist rate or even what the ballistic coefficient of a bullet is.
maby I should just buy the lighter suff. I think tomorrow I am going to order so I am up for any info now.
 

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Rhino_66 said:
The link I posted is not working because dragunov.net is upgrading. The page quoted a gunsmith as saying the PSL was not intended for 200gr ammo. The 200gr stuff beats the hell out of the gun and does not give great accuracy. The 148gr ammo is better for accuracy and life of the rifle. (I'm paraphrasing, as the page will not load!!!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks rhino I ordered two cases today of the 148 grain, just for the romak
 

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sks_hunter said:
There are several deciding factors... the distance expected to shoot, rifle twist rate, desired terminal charactaristics (what happens to the bullet on impact), and barrel length, amoung others.

I would try to find out the twist rate, then the ballistic coefficient of a bullet candidate, then go from there. you are correct, to a point, that smaller weight bullets handle higher twist rates better, but it could depend on barrel length and charge behind it, as well as bullet construction and shape. You could get yourself a reloading press and some dies, and experiment, but this might be a costly venture; however, you could make up some tackdriving loads for that nice ROMAK!!!

it all depends on what you want... cheap shootin, or exacting performance.:rockin:

P.S.
A dab of Moly Paste swabbed in your barrel after a good scrubbing will help maintain your accuracy, and it will be easier to clean after shooting.
On the issue of bullet weights and fast twist barrels, I have to disagree. I shoot an AR15 in high power competition. I use a 1x7 barrel - which is relatively fast twist. Some people think that you have to have a light bullet for a fast twist barrel, but the reality is exactly the opposite. What the fast twist gives you is the ability to stabilize a heavier bullet. As an example, in the Vietnam era, the military used a 1x12 twist with the standard 55 gr bullet and this worked fine. The bullet was slightly unstable which contributed to a tumbling effect on impact.

During the 90's the emphasis on small arms was taken from wound ballistics to penetration of body armor. For this, the military wanted to use a more stabilized heavier bullet that wouldn't tend to tumble, but remained stable to facilitate armor penetration. A slow twist barrel wouldn't do it since the bullet wouldn't be stabilized. That's why all M16 barrels today are 1x7. The 1x7 twist allows the new standard 62 gr bullet to be well stabilized.

Oh, you can shoot the lighter bullets in the M16/AR15 just fine. I shoot many short range competitions using the 55 gr bullet with no problems. You just have to be careful about the jacket. If the bullet jacket is thin, the bullet will be rotating so fast it will come apart and send little tiny fragments at your target. Using standard military issue FMJ, this isn't a problem.

There's another reason why someone would want to shoot a heavy well stabilized bullet - wind resistance a longer ranges. I load my own 600 yard ammo using an 80 gr bullet. I couldn't shoot an 80 grainer with the older 1x12 twist - accuracy would be in the gutter. Additionally, the 80 grainer provides for wind drift resistance approaching that of the 168 gr 30 caliber match bullets.

So, in summary - you can shoot light bullets in fast twist barrels as long as the jacket will withstand the twist rate. Accuracy with lighter bullets in fast twist barrels usually isn't reduced over using heavier bullets at short ranges (200-300 yds). A fast twist barrel using heavier, well stabilized bullets gives excellent wind drift resistance for long range shooting (600 yds). A slow twist barrel provides for a less stabilized bullet which facilitates tumbling and maximizes wound effect (the Soviet 5.45mm does this well).
 

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I agree with everything you said..., to a point... a heavier bullet is LONGER than a lighter one. the lighter one needs more twist to stabilize the shorter bullet, because it is not stabilized as long in the muzzle when exiting as the longer, heavier one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
saintarctangent
maby you can help me understand, I admit I do not know. why everyone seems to say the lighter 146 gr bullet will be more accurate than a 200gr bullet in my romak?? I started with 200 gr and I was amaized that the bullet went rite down the middel from 75 yrd out to 150 yrd. that bullet was just going bead ahead, with allmost no drop. now everyone told me to buy the 146gr so I bought a boat load of it and it seems to sink like a stone. I went back to the range and was dead on at 75 and it dropped at 100, and was allmost off the target at 150. I think I will buy more 200gr and set the scope back up for it.
If I am missing something simpal here please fill me in.
one last note, I work with a guy from romania and he spent quite a few years in their army and he told me the romak111 was made to shoot a 180gr bullet, i did not tell him any oppinions he came out and said 180 gr. that makes me think 200 is closer than 146.

oh yes can the 200gr hurt the gun?
THANKS HB
 

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I think that is backwards .Thats why a faster twist in a 5.56 is recomended for the longer heavier bullets.1x7 for the heavy weights and 1x12 for the lighter stuff. In 5.56 a good choice is1x9 for 55-about 62.Anything heavier a 1x7 is recomended.In 0 cal I personaly like a 1x10.But I dont shoot anything heavier than 180.If I did I would look to at least 1x9 or faster.Heavier bullets retain velocity better than light ones. For those that dont see that take a ping pong ball and golf ball and see which you can throw farther.Bore diameters seem to come into play also but the biggest thing is the longer the bullet is the faster the twist to stabilize it.It seems that the larger calibers like 45 and 50 it remains slower twist than the smaller bores.Probably because the 650-900 gr.range the bullets length isnt that different.
 
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