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That's the title of a Hank Williams, Sr. song.

He called it the perfect country song, because it tapped into the deepest passion. Don't know that I agree with him. Personally, my favorite Hank Sr. song is "Your Cheatin' Heart." I also enjoyed "Hey Good Lookin'," "Blue Eyes Cryin' in the Rain," and "I Heard My Mother Prayin' for Me." Those were all true country songs, played with instruments not heard in today's "Country-Western" music. Williams had a voice like a cat in heat, but his songs were music to the ears of poor working people whose lives were tough.

One thing I like about true Country music is it tells a story. Often, it's about infidelity, but songs such as "There's a Little Box of Pine on the 729" touch different emotional chords. Always enjoyed Jimmy Dean's "Big Bad John," and "Smoke that Cigarette."

Oddly enough, even Walter Brennan made some excellent country music, such as "Old Rivers," and "My Rifle, My Pony, and Me."

Still, with the way today's Rap Artists are hijacking rock songs, maybe we'll hear Snoop Dog rapping to "Cryin' Time?" If he does, maybe Ol' Hank will come back and knock the Hell out of him?
 

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I'm a big fan of Hank Williams Sr.
 

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I thought you guys might enjoy reading this........he was quite a guy.

ROSE, FRED

Date of Birth: August 24, 1897
Place of Birth: Evansville, Indiana
Date of Death: December 1, 1954
Marital Status: Unknown
Children: Wesley

Talents: Songwriter, Singer, Piano, Industry Executive


Biography:
It is possible that Fred Rose was the single most important person within Country music. As one half of Acuff-Rose, the first music publisher dedicated to Country music and based in Nashville, as mentor to the legendary Hank Williams, as a songwriter in both Country and Pop music and as a discoverer of talent, Rose had no equal. By the time he was age 7, Fred had, without lessons, become a proficient pianist and by the time he was 10, he was playing professionally. At age 15, he took a freight train to Chicago to develop his singing (allegedly his first love) and played the speak-easys and restaurants. He progressed to up-market night clubs and landed a recording contract with Brunswick. There were dozens of applicants to cut player piano rolls for the QRS Company, but Fred and future Jazz great, Fats Waller, were chosen. Around this time, at the still tender age of 17, Rose began his career as a songwriter. During the 20?s, he had major success with songs such as Deed I Do, Honest And Truly, and a song that would always be associated with chanteuse Sophie Tucker, Red Hot Mama. Then, Fred auditioned with at least another fifty hopefuls for the piano slot with the great Paul Whiteman?s band. He landed the job and in tandem with Roy Bargy, played the famed white grand pianos, on opposite sides of the stage, being billed as "Whiteman?s Twin Pianos." Fred then returned to Chicago, where he and singer/whistler Elmo Tanner formed a double act, the Tune Peddlers. They performed on KYW Chicago, until Tanner left and Rose began his own program, Freddie Rose?s Song Shop, which broadcast five times a week for more than a year. On the show, he wrote songs spontaneously based on titles suggested by listeners. This resulted in him being offered a show on Chicago?s WBBM, which was networked by CBS. In 1933, he moved to Nashville, where the Song Shop ran on WSM until midway through the next year. At this time, he returned to Chicago during the final year of the Windy City?s Century of Progress World?s Fair, and had a featured spot on NBC. From there he returned to Nashville and then journeyed to New York, where he became a Christian Scientist, and polarized his ambitions within the music business. He then went to Hollywood, where he wrote a number of songs for Gene Autry, including the Academy Award-nominated, Be Honest With Me (1940) and Tears On My Pillow (1940). In all, Fred wrote sixteen songs for Autry movies. During late 1942, Rose returned to Nashville, where he became the staff pianist for WSM. He still did not really understand the meaning of Country music. However, it was hearing Roy Acuff tearfully sing, on the Grand Ole Opry, Don?t Make Me Go to Bed and I?ll Be Good, a song about infant mortality, that opened his eyes. With Acuff, Acuff-Rose Publications was formed in October, 1942 and Fred began writing in the Country vein, under his own name and as "Floyd Jenkins" and "Bart Dawson." However, by 1945, Rose found that being a business executive was getting in the way of his songwriting and talent discovery. As a result, his son, Wesley, an accountant, was brought in to handle the day-to-day running of the company. The Country songs to flow from Rose?s pen included such classics as, Low And Lonely, Pins And Needles (In My Heart), Fire Ball Mail, No One Will Ever Know, Blue Eyes Cryin? In The Rain, Roly Poly (a 1946 Top 3 hit for Bob Wills), It?s A Sin (a 1947 No.1 for Eddy Arnold), Texarkana Baby (a 1948 No.1 for Eddy Arnold and a Top 20 hit for Bob Wills, the same year), Waltz Of The Wind (a 1948, Top 10 single for Roy Acuff), Deep Water, Foggy River, Faded Love And Winter Roses and We Live In Two Different Worlds. In 1945, Fred Rose recorded and charted the single, Tender-Hearted Sue for OKeh Records, under the name of Rambling Rogue. It was in 1946, that Hank and Audrey Williams entered the Acuff-Rose office. At the time, Roses, father and son, were playing their daily ping-pong match. They stopped to listen to Hank play some of his songs, signed him on the spot and took on board six of his songs. Williams was still thought of as more of a writer than performer by Rose. Acuff-Rose?s other writers at the time were Pee Wee King, Redd Stewart, Jenny Lou Carson, Paul Howard, Clyde Moody and Mel Foree. When Sterling Records wanted a Country singer, Rose put Hank forward, at Wesley?s suggestion. At both sessions, Hank sang well and the subsequent releases sold well. Rose contacted Frank Walker, who had just started the MGM label and as a result Williams joined the label. Fred guided Hank?s recording career and any song recorded by him was with Fred?s approval and either he or Wesley was present at all recording sessions. Fred also got involved with Hank on his songs and often polished up Hank?s raw material. Sometimes, he took credit. Other times, he didn?t bother. Those songs that he took credit for were A Mansion On The Hill, Kaw-Liga and I?ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive. Fred also worked with Molly O?Day, Leon Payne and Marty Robbins and with a selection of co-writers that included Ed G. Nelson, Hy Heath, Mel Foree, Zeb Turner, Ray Whitley and Cottonseed Clark. From 1949 to 1954, Rose wrote more memorable songs, including, Afraid (a Top 15 hit for Rex Allen in 1949), Crazy Heart (a Top 5 single for Hank Williams, 1951), Settin? The Woods On Fire (a Top 3 record for Hank Williams, 1952) and Take These Chains From My Heart (a posthumous 1953 No.1 for Hank Williams). Fred Rose wrote his final song, I Wonder When We?ll Ever Know, just before his death in 1954. He died of a heart attack, at the young age of 56 and among those at his funeral were Pee Wee King, Chet Atkins and Redd Stewart. In June 1955, Wesley Rose accepted the 1954 Billboard Award for "C & W Man of the Year," on behalf of his father, who was named the man who had contributed most to C & W music. In 1961, Fred Rose, was one of the first three inductees into the Country Music Hall of Fame, along with his acolyte, Hank Williams (who had predeceased Fred) and Jimmie Rodgers. It is a mark of the quality of Fred Rose?s compositions that some of the biggest recordings of his songs occurred after his death. These included No One Will Ever Know (Jimmie Rodgers, the Folk-Pop singer, 1962 and Gene Watson, 1980), Take These Chains From My Heart (Ray Charles, 1963), Deep Water, Foggy River and Faded Love And Winter Roses (all Carl Smith, 1967-1968), It?s A Sin (Marty Robbins, 1969), Kaw-Liga (Charley Pride, 1969 and Hank Williams, Jr., 1980), Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain (a Willie Nelson 1975 No.1), Mansion On The Hill (Michael Murphey, 1976 and Ray Price, the following year). Fred used his power only to benefit and this helped Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) break the hold of ASCAP, even though, he was a member of ASCAP. This has been of major assistance to songwriters to this day. Like all Renaissance men, Fred Rose lived up to his own motto, "why limit yourself."



 

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Man! That fellow had quite a career!

And wrote "Settin' the Woods on Fire", the words to which I've always really liked as an amusing ode to ******* hellraising:

Comb your hair and paint and powder you act proud and I'll act prouder
You sing loud and I'll sing louder tonight we're settin' the woods on fire
You're my gal and I'm your feller dress up in my frock and yeller
I'll look swell but you'll look sweller settin' the woods on fire
We'll take in all the honky tonks tonight we're having fun
We'll show the folks a brand new dance that never has been done
I don't care who thinks we're silly you'll be daffy I'll be dilly
We'll order up two bowls of chili settin' the woods on fire

I'll gas up my hot rod stoker we'll get hotter than a poker
You'll be broke but I'll be broker tonight we're settin' the woods on fire
We'll sit close to one another up our street and down the other
Tonight we'll have ball oh brother settin' the woods on fire
We'll put aside a little time to fix a flat or two
My trey and tubes are doin' fine but the air is showin' through
You clap hands and I'll start howlin' we'll do all the law's allowin'
Tomorrow I'll be right back plowin' settin' the woods on fire
 
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