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DADDY WARBUCKS
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19,433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do we address the problem and create solutions if the discussion is branded "racism"?

(actually racism is ok. it is racialism that is the evil but we mix up the words these days.)




The New Model? {Immigration invasion effect}
WBAL AM / RADIO 1090 Baltimore ^ | Monday, November 29, 2004 | Ron Smith

WBAL AM / RADIO 1090 Baltimore

The New Model?
Monday, November 29, 2004
Ron Smith

If you?ve ever wondered what this country will look like down the road, say 30-40 years hence, there is a metropolitan area right now that is probably a pretty accurate model for the future of the United States as a whole.

Nicholas Stix, writing in November?s Middle American News (the story is not yet available online), points out that in Los Angeles right now there are 8,000 unsolved murders, 50% of its students fail the high school graduation exam, half of the working population is illiterate, 41% are foreign-born and in L.A. County, 54% don?t speak English at home.

Crime is raging out of control. According to the California Attorney General?s report, Gangs 2000, ?The Department of Justice estimates there could be as many as 175,000 to 200,000 criminal street gang members in California.?

Furthermore, the LAPD has been handcuffed in its efforts to combat this crime epidemic fueled by waves of Mexican illegals by a state law called Special Order 40, which forbids the cops from asking people about their immigration status until and unless they?ve been charged with a felony.

These are some of the bitter fruits of multiculturalism, some of the consequences of the unfettered immigration fostered by the 1965 Immigration Reform Act. And unless this demographic trend line is somehow broken, this is the face of America come the mid-21st century.

The Census bureau has told us that by 2050, whites will be a minority in America, just as they already are in Los Angeles. This is a demographic projection that the purveyors of conventional wisdom trumpet as good news. We whites are also supposed to shut up about it, since any objection to multiculturalism is beyond the pale, out of bounds, racist.

But facts are facts, regardless of theory, and the fact of this matter is that Los Angeles and California are becoming, if they are not already, multicultural nightmares.

Yet, when Maryland Governor Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. calls multiculturalism ?crap? he is vilified for being insensitive. We are not supposed to comment upon, or even recognize, that the new multicultural America really means catastrophe, if not to us, then to our children and their children.
 

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Mystic Knight of the Sea
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13,384 Posts
As far as I'm concerned, when a politician orders the police to overlook a certain group of people when they break the law because of their race, that is racism. Laws should not be selectively enforced. That puts too much power in the hands of the bureaucrats and the police. If the law is a bad one, then it should be repealed.
 

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Code name: Felix
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6,361 Posts
I think we can probably thank our wonderful judicial system for the loss of control on criminals.

Immigration is immigration and has been going on since someone discovered Americas, the quality of immigrants is what we must watch for. We've had our share of the bad and the ugly, but mostly the good....but those of us don't make the news.

It's very complicated, America is the land of opportunities, some of us will take advantage of those opportunities to get ahead, others will simply take the easy way out and join the crime scene, it is up to us as law-abiding citizens to demand our day in court and see that these criminals get eliminated.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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19,433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is not 1900 anymore. Looks like a lot of support for ignoring the problem.


Laborers' loitering cases postponed
Potomac News ^ | November 30, 2004 | Maria Hegstad


A score of defendants in Prince William General District Court on Monday had more than the usual entourage of family, defense attorneys and Spanish interpreters.

Closely following the cases of some 22 Latino laborers charged with loitering at a Woodbridge 7-Eleven store were attorneys who work with the American Civil Liberties Union and a Virginia Justice Center for Farm and Immigrant Workers, a representative of Woodbridge Workers' Committee, and a small flock of reporters, including some from Spanish-speaking news outlets.

After court, the Workers Committee of Woodbridge held a press conference at Ricos Tacos Moya on U.S. 1, conducted almost entirely in Spanish.

The defendants are day laborers, who wait at two 7-Eleven stores and Covenant Presbyterian Church in Woodbridge hoping to get work from contractors. Their presence at the 7-Eleven stores has resulted in regular calls to Prince William County police, Capt. Tim Rudy said in a telephone interview Monday. The arrest of the group of laborers for loitering has spawned citizens' meetings, a workers' protest and discussion amongst county government officials. Awareness of the situation was one of the outcomes Rudy said he hoped for when officers arrested the laborers.

The laborers have permission from the church to wait for work on church property, which is across the street from the Longview Drive 7-Eleven store, church member Robert C. Gaskill said. Gaskill, who came to support the workers at the courthouse, said he sympathized with those trying to find work. Some of the laborers have helped the church with landscaping and cleanup on workdays, Gaskill said. Church officials could not be reached Monday.

Workers Committee of Woodbridge leader Ricardo Juarez said managers at the 7-Eleven had also granted permission for workers to wait in the 7-Eleven parking lot until 9:30 am. But the 7-Eleven store and its parking lot are surrounded by "no trespassing, no loitering" signs in Spanish and English that warn violators will be prosecuted. 7-Eleven spokesperson Margaret Chabris said the signs were put up last winter.

"We would do that on a case by case basis," Chabris said of the signs. "It was a response to the loitering."

Juarez and Virginia Justice Center for Farm and Immigrant Workers lawyer Tim Freilich said they felt the workers were being targeted. They expressed particular concern that some of the defendants had been turned over to federal Citizenship and Immigration Services, formerly known as Immigration and Naturalization Services.

Rudy said that of the 22 defendants from the 7-Eleven at U.S. 1 and Longview Drive, 11 had identification and addresses and were released with summons. The other 11 were taken into custody because officers didn't have addresses for them. A magistrate gave the remaining defendants $500 bonds, but they were taken to jail because they couldn't post bond, Rudy said. The 11 names were run through a police identification system, and three names were flagged with "unique correspondence with INS," Rudy said. The notation was unclear, so police contacted INS with the three names.

"I think we would be remiss with INS [if we didn't contact them]," Rudy said. "In doing so, INS asked for all 11 names. ? INS sent detainers for all 11."

Some of the laborers didn't appear in court Monday, and were tried in their absence. Alexandria defense attorney John K. Zwerling said most of the defendants who didn't appear had been detained by INS, and this could pose problems with those convictions.

"Ticketing day laborers for loitering won't fix the immigration issue or the day laborer issue," Freilich said. Freilich did much of the interpreting between defendants and ACLU attorneys in court hallways Monday. He said his Falls Church organization primarily handles cases where day laborers are cheated out of their wages. "Arresting day laborers for loitering only undermines community policing throughout Northern Virginia," he said.

Rudy said he realizes arrests aren't the answer. He said he hoped to dissuade the workers from congregating at the 7-Eleven and he hoped to bring the situation to public attention.

"The police department sympathizes with their desire to get work to support their families," Rudy said.

Officers had an unwritten rule that they wouldn't take action until after 9 a.m. After that time, it was unlikely workers would get jobs, and it was after 9 a.m. when most of the loitering complaints came in, Rudy said. Callers complained about laborers littering, urinating in public, drinking, being disorderly and acting lewdly toward female customers.

Juarez pointed out Monday that none of the defendants was charged with anything other than loitering. Rudy said officers could have charged laborers with other offenses, but chose not to do so.

One of the defendants, Johan Pavon of Woodbridge, entered a no contest plea to loitering Monday. He agreed that if a judge heard the facts in his case, they would be sufficient to convict him of loitering. A judge will reconsider his case in six months. If Pavon complies with court orders to stay away from the 7-Eleven store at U.S. 1 and Longview Drive and be of good behavior, the charge will be dismissed.

Assistant Commonwealth's Attorney Steven W. Grist said the outcome was a good one, allowing Pavon to keep the conviction off his record while preventing loitering at the 7-Eleven.

The majority of defendants had their cases postponed until January, when they will be represented by attorneys working with the ACLU. Executive Director Kent Willis said the ACLU formally agreed to take the laborers' cases, and may file a civil action claiming the county loitering ordinance is unconstitutionally vague.

"We find all these ordinances to be constitutionally suspect," Willis said in a phone interview Monday, though he said he couldn't elaborate specifically on why the ordinance was unconstitutional. "We have to take the words as well as the way it's applied."

Rudy disagreed that the county ordinance is unconstitutional. He said that vagrancy laws have been found to be unconstitutional, but loitering laws are constitutional. The police department has charged people with loitering for years, Rudy said.

Willis said the Virginia chapter of the ACLU hasn't taken a formal vote on filing a lawsuit, but added that doesn't mean the ACLU won't.

"The question will boil down to the facts," Willis said. "Our understanding [is] these are individuals -- obviously people have the right to go to 7-Eleven -- simply gathering in a constitutionally protected way."

The remaining defendants' cases will be heard Jan. 13. Loitering is a class 1 misdemeanor, with a maximum punishment of a $2,500 fine and/or 12 months in jail.
 

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Mystic Knight of the Sea
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13,384 Posts
"We find all these ordinances to be constitutionally suspect," Willis said in a phone interview Monday, though he said he couldn't elaborate specifically on why the ordinance was unconstitutional. "We have to take the words as well as the way it's applied."

That's the mentality of the ACLU. They feel if a law mostly affects a certain group of minorities, it must be racially motivated. But, that is not the case at all. It is just that a certain racial group violates the law more than other groups. Real simple answer - stop violating the law.
 

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Code name: Felix
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6,361 Posts
We have had similar situations down here with migrant and non-migrant workers, even though I wouldn't like the idea of a group of them congregating near my neighborhood waiting for work, I will suspect those are not the ones involved in hard crimes either. But I tell you what, when I need some heavy yard work done I know where to go to.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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19,433 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You would have to be blind to knock the work ethic but you also have to turn a blind eye to the illegality and bad social policy.
 

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Code name: Felix
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6,361 Posts
Custer said:
You would have to be blind to knock the work ethic but you also have to turn a blind eye to the illegality and bad social policy.
Well, at least these are guys who are not looking at an eight hour work day as mandated by the union. You give them one hundred Dollars and lunch and they work their shirts off. Perhaps the ones we get down here are different, they really come to work.

Bad social policy you said?...Society gets hurt by politicians more than by immigrations. If they would please their constituents more than their own pockets, immigration might lessen to some extent.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In case I was not clear, I think they work their butts off. They seem to consistently outclass many native born American workers.
 
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