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[font=Palatino, Georgia, Times New Roman, Times, serif][size=+2]Disaster mystery:
No dead animals
[/size][/font]
[font=Palatino, Georgia, Times New Roman, Times, serif][size=+1]Sri Lankan wildlife officials stunned by lack of carcasses[/size][/font]
[size=-1]Posted: December 29, 2004
3:50 a.m. Eastern

[/size] [font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times] [/font] [font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times][font=Palatino, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times, serif]
[size=-1] ? 2004 WorldNetDaily.com [/size] [/font] [/font]



[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]As the human death toll from Sunday's earthquake and subsequent tsunami continues to skyrocket in Asia, a mystery is unfolding in Sri Lanka. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]Somehow, the animals survived the disaster. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times][/font] [font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]According to reports out of Colombo, Sri Lankan wildlife officials are said to be stunned. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]"The strange thing is we haven't recorded any dead animals," H.D. Ratnayake, deputy director of the national Wildlife Department, told Reuters. "No elephants are dead, not even a dead hare or rabbit." [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]"I think animals can sense disaster," he added. "They have a sixth sense. They know when things are happening." [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]The sentiment was echoed by Gehan de Silva Wijeyeratne, whose Jetwing Eco Holidays runs a hotel in the Yala National Park, the country's largest wildlife reserve where hundreds of wild elephants dwell along with some 130 other species. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]"This is very interesting. I am finding bodies of humans, but I have yet to see a dead animal,'' he told the Associated Press. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]Floodwaters reportedly rushed up to two miles inland at the park, where 41 human bodies have been recovered so far, including 13 foreigners, according to Lanka Business Online. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]Wildlife officers reportedly found a 13-year-old boy yesterday morning, the only survivor of the tsunami at the park. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]Wildlife Conservation Director General Dayananda Kariyawasam told the paper except for dead fish, no carcasses of animals have been found. [/font]

[font=Palatino, Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Georgia, Times]The human death toll in Sri Lanka exceeds 21,000. [/font]
 

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Code name: Felix
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Interesting.

Animals can sense danger, perhaps because they rely on their senses for survival more than we do.
 

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I know around here you can always tell when the weather is going to change by the deer. If it's going to get bad, they hit the fields in droves.

Another interesting note. When we had chickens and let them out of the coop for the day, you could tell about the rain by watching them. If it started to rain and they ran for cover, the rain would only last a few minutes. But if they stayed out and didn't run for cover, it would rain all day. Guess they figured if it was going to quit in a few minutes, it wasn't worth getting wet for.
 
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