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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That's how fast Mt. St. Helens is growing. At this rate, Geologists say, within 6 years she'll be back to the same size she was before the May 18th, 1980 explosion.

BEFORE:


AFTER: (same veiwpoint)




USGS said:
Mount St. Helens Volcano Activity


Current status is Volcano Advisory (Alert Level 2); aviation color code ORANGE

Growth of the new lava dome inside the crater of Mount St. Helens continues and is accompanied by intermittent emissions of steam and ash. As long as this eruption is in progress, episodic changes in the level of activity can occur over days, weeks, or even months. Increase in the intensity of eruption could occur suddenly or with very little warning and may include explosive events that produce hazardous conditions within several miles of the volcano. Small lahars (volcanic debris flows) could suddenly descend the Toutle River valley if triggered by heavy rain or by interaction of hot rocks with snow or glacier ice. These lahars pose a negligible hazard below the Sediment Retention Structure (SRS) but could pose a hazard to people along the river channel upstream of the SRS. At this time of year, it is not unusual for rivers draining the volcano to contain high concentrations of sediment that turn the water murky.

Although considered less likely at this time, the current eruptive activity could evolve into a more explosive phase that affects areas farther from the volcano and sends significant ash thousands of feet above the crater where it could be a hazard to aircraft and to downwind communities.

Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise high above the crater rim today would drift southeastward.

Here's a list of some other potentially grouchy Mountains in our back yard:
http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Vhp/C1073/active_volcanoes_washington.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep. I lived about 30 miles NW of it. The bottom picture is sorta like the veiw we had from out front porch, but we would have been farther away and a bit more off to the right.
I was only six, but remember it well. We woke up in the morning and threw on our coats and barn boots because we thought it was snow. My mom just about shit herself and pulled us back inside by our collars.
We spent the rest of that spring and summer having to wear long sleeves jeans and dust masks everywhere we went. Wasnt a big deal because it never got very warm that year. When it first came down people tried to hose it off, but it just turned to cement and made many roofs collapse so they had to wait till August for it to dry up then sweep and shovel it into piles at the curb for front-end loaders to come and pick up much like your weekly trash day. When we'd walk through the forest, one of our favorite pranks was to give a tree a shake, the scoot on ahead before the 150 lbs of ash came down on the guy behind you, making him look like something out of A Christmas Carol.

:D
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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It is great country out there D.B. but do you ever worry about this thing going off again and getting a result as bad if not worse?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nope, not at all. It simple really, as long as you are far enough away and not one of those dummies that lives in one of the valleys right at the base of an active volcano you're fine. The only reason Id GTF outta Dodge is if Rainier blew, and even then it would just be to stay at my Brother's in Cali untill the extent of the damage was realized.
Some of those numbskulls are building their houses right at the edge of the park.
Its even more shameful that the counties and FEMA allow it, since it is the taxpayers that pays for their stupidity when things do go off and their beautiful 3/4 million dollar country estate ends up as sun bleached & battered driftwood on the Pacific coast.
Maybe these same planners and commissioners are direct decendants of the guys who plotted and planned Pompeii.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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We have the same kind of thing around here. The Ohio River floods ever few years despite the Army Corps of Engineers spending millions of dollars since the 1930's. While it is nowhere near as bad as the old days, it still ruins things right along the banks.

When it floods, the TV crews run to the homeowners for a camera shot and interview. Great drama with the usual tears and "I've lost everything" lament. No insurance because no on in their right mind would sell it to these morons who insist on living right on the banks. (there is no flood risk only flood certainty)

Then the interview concludes with the person saying "yes' to the question if they are going to move back in. "Lived here all my life and I ain't movin'." After that, someone starts a charity relief fund to help flood victims.
 

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DB,

That must have been quite a experience.

Closest I've ever come to something like that was the blizzard of 78.
Snowed like hell for two days, 40 to 50 inches, depending on where you lived, drifts of 6 to 8 feet.
All roads in and around Boston were closed for a week.

Doesn't really compare to what you went through, but I'll never forget it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Custer said:
We have the same kind of thing around here. The Ohio River floods ever few years despite the Army Corps of Engineers spending millions of dollars since the 1930's. While it is nowhere near as bad as the old days, it still ruins things right along the banks.

When it floods, the TV crews run to the homeowners for a camera shot and interview. Great drama with the usual tears and "I've lost everything" lament. No insurance because no on in their right mind would sell it to these morons who insist on living right on the banks. (there is no flood risk only flood certainty)

Then the interview concludes with the person saying "yes' to the question if they are going to move back in. "Lived here all my life and I ain't movin'." After that, someone starts a charity relief fund to help flood victims.
We used to have that too.

Weyerhauser clearcut the entire watershed of the entire river system, all tributaries included, and it caused massive widescale flooding every year for a 10 year period. After the 3rd flood, the poor bumkins who lived down by the river were all bought out by FEMA and those that refused were no longer eligible for flood relief. Some still stayed and for the same idiotic, pig-headed reason you mentioned. And also like you said, every year we'd see the news teams down there interveiwing these same 5 whitetrash retard families and every year it was the same "we lost evurythang" sob story.
It was kind of cool, however when in 1996, when we had the last and biggest flood, we were literally stranded in town for three days with all roads blocked, we all went down to the liquor store and went on a three day bender. (nutin' else to do, nowhere to go) On day two, we all piled into a canoe and went-a-floatin' 20 feet above Interstate 5. I tell ya, that flood water has a powerful current you dont notice until you're in it.
In the early 90's before the last flood, the state and the EPA put a restriction on logging in that watershed, and they havent had a problem since the trees started to grow back.
 
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