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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been putting off builiding an AK for quite some time. I guess I'm a little intimidated with all the different parts and pieces and so many tools which do different things. I also can't decide which to start with the first, the AK parts or the tools. I guess all that depends on what I want to build. Perhaps you guys can direct me if I fill you in on what I want to build. I figure its in my best interest to start with a basic run of the mill AK. I definitely don't want to start out with one of those Druganov's from CF, given the price and it being such a nice weapon that I'd hate to make a mistake on. So I figure something in the ball park of a SAR-1 put together with rivets but with no special add ons. From here, the next question is, parts or tools first? I have access to a welder, although I've never used one. I think it is a Mig? It's a Craftsmen that feed wire from a spool under the welder's cover. It also has a plastic tube attached to it that you can hook up and run some type of gas through while welding. I also have access to a drill press and dremel tool as well as your basic home owner's tools such as hammer, screwdrivers, wrenches etc.
 

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Buy a parts kit first, I bought one and in a week I bought another, then another. The Polish kits Global is selling are nice and the 63's CF is selling are nice. I have both.

Just buy the kits and keep looking at them, before too long you will be hooked like a catfish on a trot line.... You will have them built in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can you use the barrel that comes with the 63 parts kit from CF for a build? But what about the receiver?
 

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parts first for shure... Sometimes the parts will dictate what tools you need
 

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Definitely parts first....after I had my parts, the will to get the tools started. But if I didn't have the parts....well.....

Don't think...just do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So with what you've guys seen out there, what receiver would you get? I don't think I really want to learn how to weld. The U-Bend receivers look like maybe there is a little too much work involved for the first time builder. What about the ones from...can't remember the name of the web site. They claim to have the thickest metal used in their receivers.
 

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The receivers you are referring to are made by Global.

I my opinion they are too thick, to even be bothered with.
They require milling of the trunnions, at the very least. I also feel there would be issues with the axis pins and possibly the selector as well.

If you want to start with a finished receiver, use OOW or a Vulcan/Hesse.

If you really want to build one, as opposed to assembling one, start with a Ace bent blank.

PS :welcome:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK I'm sold! The three main groups of parts I'll need are the receiver, trigger group, and stock set right? Or do the ones from CF come with everything I'll need including the US made parts? Is it easiest to order these separately?
 

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yosuthnmasa said:
I've been putting off builiding an AK for quite some time. I guess I'm a little intimidated with all the different parts and pieces and so many tools which do different things. I also can't decide which to start with the first, the AK parts or the tools. I guess all that depends on what I want to build. Perhaps you guys can direct me if I fill you in on what I want to build. I figure its in my best interest to start with a basic run of the mill AK. I definitely don't want to start out with one of those Druganov's from CF, given the price and it being such a nice weapon that I'd hate to make a mistake on. So I figure something in the ball park of a SAR-1 put together with rivets but with no special add ons. From here, the next question is, parts or tools first? I have access to a welder, although I've never used one. I think it is a Mig? It's a Craftsmen that feed wire from a spool under the welder's cover. It also has a plastic tube attached to it that you can hook up and run some type of gas through while welding. I also have access to a drill press and dremel tool as well as your basic home owner's tools such as hammer, screwdrivers, wrenches etc.
You are describing a Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welder. The plastic tube hooks up to a flow meter and the flow meter connects to a bottle of inert (argon or simular) gas. Wire is fed from the spool, through the "welding gun" (the part that you hold), and gas flows around the wire toward the molten metal. The gas shields the metal and keeps impurities from forming that could spoil the weld.

The machine that you are discribing will most certainly have to have wire speed, and amperage controls. You may or may not be able to set the feed and amperage DOWN low enough to weld very thin sheet metal (1mm). I believe that Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding would be the better way to weld a sheet metal receiver. This is simular to MIG in that inert shielding gas is used during the weld. However, this system uses a sharpened tungsten electrode that protudes out of the welding gun or handpiece. The arc is struck by holding the electrode very close to the work and depressing a switch. (Usually a foot switch, in my experiance.) Then welding rod is fed into the arc and onto the work. (Very simular to regular oxy-acetylene "gas" welding.) These machines are usually more expensive than MIG welders. However, these machines are more adjustable. You will need to used the correct alloy and thickness of welding wire (MIG) or welding rod (Gas, TIG).

It takes a lot of practice to do both of these methods correctly. I would not recommend practicing on a $30.00, laser cut flat.

I recommend checking with your local vocational/technical training school. See if they offer adult, evening classes. You will learn very, very much more that I can write here. Plus, you will have access to the welding machines, and practice materials. You will have an instructor who can take a look at your work and make suggestions on how to improve it.

Yours,
Thumb Clip Pull Pin
 

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Thumb Clip Pull Pin said:
I recommend checking with your local vocational/technical training school. See if they offer adult, evening classes. You will learn very, very much more that I can write here. Plus, you will have access to the welding machines, and practice materials. You will have an instructor who can take a look at your work and make suggestions on how to improve it.
Woohoo! Building an AK47 in shop class! Every high school kid's dream! At least it was mine... :naughty:
 

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No weapons in school.

No you will not be able to build the complete rifle in welding shop class. You will be able to practice on simular size and thickness metal, perhaps you can ask permission from your instructor if you can bring in a laser cut flat, and weld the sides and the lower rails. Besides all of this, you just might learn to weld properly.

Yours,
Thumb Clip Pull Pin
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sorry for such a slow response. I've actually been busy at school! Not the local tech school though. I've been busy working differential equations and learning RC and DC circuits. However, I did look into the tech school, applied and will be speaking to the teacher that teaches all of the welding classes. What is the most accepted way of welding a "flat" It seems as though the flat can be welded numerous ways, but which way is the most commonly used. I will use this information to determine which class to take...MIG, TIG, etc. The welder does have a bunch of knobs on the top with different settings and such.
 

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7.62x39 said:
The receivers you are referring to are made by Global.

I my opinion they are too thick, to even be bothered with.
They require milling of the trunnions, at the very least. I also feel there would be issues with the axis pins and possibly the selector as well.

If you want to start with a finished receiver, use OOW or a Vulcan/Hesse.

If you really want to build one, as opposed to assembling one, start with a Ace bent blank.

PS :welcome:

Who or what is "OOW" I've heard of Vulcan/Hesse, Even though I don't know anything about them, I have heard of them. but OOW ?
 

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