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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Girls face deadly weapon charge
Santa Cruz Sentinel ^ | 12/1/04 | Cathy Redfern

SANTA CRUZ ? Two teen girls arrested for stabbing a 13-year-old girl outside Santa Cruz High School had participated earlier in the day in a conflict-resolution process at the alternative school they attend.

Detectives believe the Monday afternoon stabbing, which did not involve Santa Cruz High students, was sparked by the suspected stabber?s belief that the victim had spread a rumor about her to a boy, Sgt. Brad Goodwin said.

The alleged attackers, ages 13 and 14 and whose names are not being released because they?re juveniles, were arrested at one of the girl?s homes in Santa Cruz about 7 p.m. Monday and taken to Juvenile Hall in Felton, police said.

The pair faces charges of assault with a deadly weapon.

The teens attend Star Community School on Frederick Street, and educators there said the victim was expected to be released from Stanford Medical Center sometime today. They said the victim, a Soquel resident, and one of the suspects had argued days earlier outside the small, 50-student school, and that a teacher conducted a conflict resolution with all three of them Monday.

But detectives say the victim and a friend had come to the high school to meet friends and that the two suspects went there to confront her. About 3:15 p.m., she was stabbed three times in the lower back.

One of the girls stabbed the victim with a knife, Goodwin said; he added that the second suspect contributed to the assault and was arrested for the same charge.

Prosecutor Ariadne Symons said she anticipated charges would be filed today. The teens will be arraigned Thursday in juvenile court, she said.

Johnny Rice, a teacher at Star, said the girls had argued outside school on Nov. 19. There were no threats made, he said, but as a precaution they were asked to remain out of school for the three days before Thanksgiving and to return only if willing to resolve the problem.

In the meantime, he spoke to their parents and other school officials. Rice said the girls by Monday appeared willing to move on.

"They each owned to their part and agreed to put the incident behind them," he said. "Everything seemed fine. We?ve done similar processes many, many times with kids, and this is the only time it has netted a negative outcome. I don?t think the incident could have been foreseen."

The school incorporates counseling and teaches conflict resolution, non-violent communication and other life skills to at-risk kids, he said.

"But building character is a process, and there are no magic buttons," he said. "Kids can be impulsive and make mistakes, and unfortunately for all those involved, this was a particularly large mistake."

Star is run by the county Office of Education. The office?s director, Michael Watkins, said the girls arrested won?t be allowed back in school "if and when they are released." He called the attack an isolated incident and said he does not anticipate any retaliation.

"We?ll pick up the pieces and go on," he said.

Santa Cruz High School lost its school resource officer to budget cuts this year, but a district assistant superintendent said he did not believe that had any bearing on the stabbing.

Ralph Porras said the school is "very safe" and has two full-time campus supervisors who are quick to question visitors who don?t check in at the school office and display a required visitor?s badge.

"It appears it happened very fast," he said. "The supervisors would have asked them to leave if they had been hanging out."

Santa Cruz police Lt. Rick Martinez said there have not been any significant problems at the high school this year, but that it would help to have an officer on site.
 

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alternative school
thats a give away, they have problems and now more so.
 

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Further evidence of the ineffectiveness of your clumsy American efforts at political re-education. Do you not understand what gulags are for?

On a more serious note...

"The school incorporates counseling and teaches conflict resolution, non-violent communication and other life skills to at-risk kids, he said."

One place I am likely to be in agreement with the more conservative members of these forums is that I think it is stupid to saddle schools with having to treach that sort of stuff to the kids. That's the parents' responsibility. Every hour spent teaching "conflict resolution, nonviolent communication and other life skills" is an hour that the school did not spend teaching the kids academic subjects.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As Cowdawg said it is a gulag. They just call it an alternative school.
 

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Custer said:
"But building character is a process, and there are no magic buttons," he said. "Kids can be impulsive and make mistakes, and unfortunately for all those involved, this was a particularly large mistake."
Doesn't sound like a mistake to me, sounds like she fully intended to stab the girl- unless she says she accidently ran a knife into her lower back (from behind, as it would seem) three times

I would say these two are future inamtes of the California Womens Correctional System.
Alternative School= jail school for kids who are just too damn violent for regular, normally violent California schools. Basically a parking place and social experimentation area for kids between regular school and jail.
 

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Dzerzhinsky said:
That's the parents' responsibility.
I think that is the major problem, too many parents just don't care. I'm not referring to all parents, but the shoe fits a lot of them.
 

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Preacher said:
I think that is the major problem, too many parents just don't care. I'm not referring to all parents, but the shoe fits a lot of them.
We're in agreement. But if the parents fail to meet their responsibility, I don't know that makes it the school's. If I fail to meet my responsibility to pay my electricity bill, that doesn't make it your responsibility to do so.

Ah, the whole thing sucks, what can I say? I used to see kids like this when I was a counselor-type, and a common scenario was that the folks would set absolutely no limits with the kids, impose no discipline at all, until the kid became a teenager. And then they'd wonder why the kid was such an out-of-control teenager!

I dunno just how much schools can teach values besides demonstrating them themselves (e.g. if you want the kids to be honest and punctual, it would behoove a teacher to not lie to the kids and to show up for class on time). I was fortunate: I did get some values-education from schools, I guess, but not formally. My hunter-safety instructor and I used to go shooting and he became a mentor, same with my rifle-team coach in High School.
 

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Dzerzhinsky said:
We're in agreement. But if the parents fail to meet their responsibility, I don't know that makes it the school's. If I fail to meet my responsibility to pay my electricity bill, that doesn't make it your responsibility to do so.

Ah, the whole thing sucks, what can I say? I used to see kids like this when I was a counselor-type, and a common scenario was that the folks would set absolutely no limits with the kids, impose no discipline at all, until the kid became a teenager. And then they'd wonder why the kid was such an out-of-control teenager!

I dunno just how much schools can teach values besides demonstrating them themselves (e.g. if you want the kids to be honest and punctual, it would behoove a teacher to not lie to the kids and to show up for class on time). I was fortunate: I did get some values-education from schools, I guess, but not formally. My hunter-safety instructor and I used to go shooting and he became a mentor, same with my rifle-team coach in High School.
Well, the way I see it Dzerz (I still like Smegs better) this is all a product of the feel good, everyone else is responsible liberal culture that is especially prevalent in education.

Yes, I think parents have the greatest responsibility to teach their children responsible behavior, and way too many of them are not doing that these days. Of course the liberal attitude towards discipline doesn't help that. "Time-outs" and all that other PC crap doesn't work, and nowadays a little swat on the bottom could get your kids taken away from you. Its ridiculous. There is no excuse for physical abuse, but a little corporal punishment goes a long way. When I was a kid, and I did something wrong or bad, I got a smack. Hell, I even got the belt a few times for major transgressions, even my mouth washed out with soap a few times....believe me, I got the message. And my parents were often complimented on what well behaved and mannered children they had, both me and my sister.

Same with teachers and school staff....I remembered getting paddled in elementary school (not hard, it didn't hurt, but it scared the bejeezus out of me!). Then, and even in high school in the 80's, kids were a bit scared of, and respectful (for the most part, there were always exceptions) of the principles....now, hell, they know there are no real consequences to bad behavior, so they don't give a damn about authority (I'm generalizing of course, not all kids are like this).

And of course the liberal culture and many educators nowadays (and I know this first hand, my sister is a liberal, and working on her teaching degree, and we have many a discussion on a lot of this) none of these kids are responsible for their own behavior...its always the fault of society, inequities, their peers, blah, blah, blah. Liberals don't believe in personal responsibility, and they think they can solve the problems with love and understanding. Well, I here to tell you, some problems need a lot more.

Here in Buffalo, we used to have "alternative" schools, basically half way house for scumbag kids who couldn't behave. Better to get them out of the regular schools so the kids who wanted to learn, and not get the crap beat out of them or worse, could get a real education. But of course instead of working to correct the attitudes of the bad ones, they just said, "Oh, poor Lashawn, he grew up in a bad area, and society turned its back on him, so when he stabs someone, its a cry for help. Lets just coddle him, and maybe he'll turn around". Of course it didn't work, and the liberals can't figure out why. Then they got rid of the alternative schools....to "integrate" the kids back into the regular ones.

Now of course, the teachers are up in arms about violence in the schools...teachers are getting stabbed, threatened, etc., and of course with the other students its even worse. These bad kids then maybe get suspended for a while, but are soon right back in the mix, pulling their old tricks.

I personally think the answer is to start expecting parents to go back to real parenting, and teaching their children values and morals and responsibility. Also schools need to start getting stricter and harsher with problems, especially early on. A lot of these kids show their anti-social tendencies in elementary school, but nothing is done about it then, and by the time they are in middle school and high school, they are out of control. It needs to be a partnership between the parents and educators, with realistic and effective actions to correct problems. And teaching and demanding personal responsibilty for actions is definitely needed....
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When I was growing up my parents were on the same page with the schools. They were seen as allies. They had shared standards and values.

When my kids were growing up my wife and I were not on the same page with the schools. We were not allies. We did not share standards and values.

There is a real gap there and if you have to really pay attention to what is being done at the school, and what is not being done.
 
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