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I'm new to the whole forum thing so my apologies if I'm posting this thread incorrectly.

I picked up a Belarusian made PSO scope last night. After mounting I discovered that the reticle is canted pretty badly approximately 20°... Does anyone know how to remedy this problem?
 

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You should introduce you're self first, normally, but I don't think we care all that much if you're not a spammer.

Any Hoo,,are you sure your scope is true and level , with your gun? Or is the cant noticeable without the scope being mounted, do you see a visible cant when just looking through the scope itself? If the latter, send it back. I recommend a set of bubble levels to be sure to get everything aligned well with the gun itself, that eliminates any errors there. That and lapping rings is a must,, especially if for anything you plan to use for long range, IMHO,little misalignment's can make a big difference in performance at long ranges, and those require more work to get right. I don't know what you're application is, but other than my fancy long range guns It's not really that critical if I'm setting up for something like a AK platform that normally you're not shooting at more than 150 yards max, or a bolt gun with modern rings and base's just make sure everything is torqued down even,,again with a long range application, I'd use a adjustable torque screwdriver/wrench,, just another one of those extra little things you'd do for long range work.

Hope that helps out,,,
 

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His scope is molded to the side mount. It doesn't use rings.

I've seen a breakdown of the internals of a PSO but I've never had one apart myself. The reticle has rotated out of position somehow. You can go to google images and find breakdowns of the internals but you will loose the nitrogen fill when you crack it open. Hope it was cheap!
 

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That right I forgot the scope body is part of the mount on those. I guess I was speaking in general terms.

But the true and level to the gun will still apply none the less and if on a AK it could be canted because of the side of the receiver not being totally perpendicular to the plane of the gun, or at a true 90 degree angle. And removing the base plate and milling it down to make it "square" with the bottom and top of the receiver may be in order if the scope itself true,,I hope I'm saying this right so it doesn't sound to confusing. But I think you'll know what I mean. I don't have a great deal of experience with these scopes and don't care for them at all myself, so there may be other methods of "squaring" them I'm not aware of. I've run into AK receivers that weren't truly "square" but I was using a after market side mount that had separate ring/mount/scope combo's so it wasn't a big deal to get the X-hairs level, but you could defiantly notice the mount itself wasn't true to the reciever. I'm sure even being off 1 degree could transfer to quite a bit of cant by the time you get to the top of the mount. Try the bubble levels to get an idea if it is true.

But you know ,,I've got one friend that seems to mount every single scope at a slight cant for some reason,,and I've never seen him miss anything,, not even once,,don't ask me why?? And yet, he shoots critters at some pretty respectable ranges and his scopes when you look through them are all canted on every single gun he owns. But somehow he still seems to hit anything he's aiming at. I've seen him drop running yotties at 600 yards plus, but I can't hit shit with the same gun.

But he's all bunged up and crunched over, so maybe that just levels everything out for him!!! :dunno::lol::lol:
 

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The reticle can be straightened. Here is a recap from an old post from this site that might help you out.>>

Ok well I found the solution over at gunco.net...Went through these directions and it worked out extremely well.

"Yeah, I had the same problem with my scope. In fact, I don't think I've seen a PSL scope that didn't have this problem. It's actually not that hard to correct, but it requires opening up the scope and a doing lot of repetitive manual adjustments, so if you're willing to do that, read on...

Around the body of the scope where the eyepiece tube (the end where you look into the scope, dunno what the actual name of it is) screws into it, there are three extremely tiny screws. They're easy to miss becuase they've been painted over and look like tiny dimples. Take a jeweler's screwdriver and unscrew these. These are locking screws that lock the eyepiece tube in place, so once these are removed the entire eyepiece tube can be unscrewed counterclockwise. The thing has probably been screwed on since its manufacture so it may be stuck, but a pair of pliers with a thick piece of leather (I.E. an old belt you don't need anymore) around the scope so that you won't scrape it will help you take it off.

Once the eyepiece tube is removed, look inside the body and you'll see a metal square with a round hole in the middle, with three screws in it. This is the windage/elevation assembly, and the screws mount the reticle on the other side of this assembly. Loosen up all three screws but do not unscrew them all the way- if you do, the reticle will detach and you'll need to take the front scope tube off to screw it back on (the front tube comes off the exact same way as the eyepiece tube, if you need to do this).

You will notice that the screws holding the reticle to the windage/elevation assembly aren't screwed into holes. but semicircular slots. These slots are there to allow you to adjust the reticle by rotating the reticle a fraction of an inch clockwise and counterclockwise. Now comes the pain in the [censored] part: with a jeweler's screwdriver, push the upper right screw along its slot to rotate the reticle in the direction you need to correct it by, and then tighten it, leaving the other screws loose for now. Screw the eyepiece tube back in, mount in onto your rifle, and check the reticle. You will find that all you need to do is move the reticle a hair and it'll look like it was rotated a mile, so there's no way around having to measure it by eye. You'll need to repeat the process of unscrewing the eyetube, unscrewing the upper right screw holding the reticle to the elevation/windage assembly, rotating the reticle a hair, tightening it again, screwing the eyetube back on, mounting it on your rifle, and checking how the reticle looks by eye until the reticle lines up properly.

Once you have the reticle to your liking, unscrew the eyetube one more time, tighten all three reticle screws, screw the eyetube back on and screw the locking screws back in. It helps to find a bowl to put the locking screws in as you're doing all this becuase they're practically microscopic and VERY easy to lose. You'll obviously need to take it to the range to zero the scope to the rifle again, once you're done. FYI try not to breathe into the scope while you're doing this- moisture from your breath may get trapped inside the scope, leaving the glass all fogged up when you take it out to the field.

Hope this helps!

-Good Ol' Dave"
 
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