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Master Endmill Breaker
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Well, I bought a Walther Top Point red dot sight. I've never used a red dot sight before, but the price was too good not to buy it. So here's a red dot newb question;

So now that I've actually looked through it, is the reticle supposed to move as your position changes? What I mean is, when I am not looking through the exact center of the scope, the reticle appears to move to line up with my eye position. If I look through the exact center and then move slightly off center, the reticle moves and always appears to line up with my target. Is this normal?
 

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Master Endmill Breaker
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
That's exactly what I wanted to know. It's kind of odd, but I'm diggin' the red dot action. I got the 45mm Top Point. That thing is like a Coke can on top of the rifle...
 

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There should be no "paralax" as you describe with your red-dot. The older, original "aimpoint" sights had a dome on the top, and a little fiber optic pin to collect light. these were often terrible for that. the newer LED models are supposedly paralax free.
 

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funny observation.. must be the newbie in us cuz my daughters got me one for my birthday and I noticed the same thing.

I think thats dope as hell.. I cant understand why I think that.. but I do.. I havent got to take mine out and try it yet... I need to get a side mount.
 

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sks_hunter said:
There should be no "paralax" as you describe with your red-dot. The older, original "aimpoint" sights had a dome on the top, and a little fiber optic pin to collect light. these were often terrible for that. the newer LED models are supposedly paralax free.
To my understanding, what's being described isn't parallax. That parallax refers to whether the bullets point of impact changes as the relationship between the sight and the shooters' eye changes. So long as the point of impact continues to be wherever the red dot is, the scope is parallax free regardless of whether or not the red dot appears to move within the scope or not.

With my Kobra, whether the reticule is centered* in the Kobra or not varies with changes in the position of my sighting eye relative to the Kobra, yet point of impact doesn't change. My understanding is that the Kobra is parallax-free.

*More accurately, just how much the reticule isn't centered. With a Kobra, at least mine, it's never really centered - which I find to be a bit disconcerting.
 

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The manual that came with my EO Tech points out that the location of the dot within the tube may vary due to viewing angle, however it will always be POI.

I have found this to be true.
 

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sks_hunter said:
There should be no "paralax" as you describe with your red-dot. The older, original "aimpoint" sights had a dome on the top, and a little fiber optic pin to collect light. these were often terrible for that. the newer LED models are supposedly paralax free.
That effect isn't parallax. Parallax is the unavoidable fact that the scope and the barrel are not exactly in line with each other.

Therefore, they have to vertically "crosseye" to meet up at the bullseye.

If you picture this, you can see that the point of impact and the scope dot or crosshairs are ONLY aligned at one point (actually two points, but that's a different subject).

A red dot sight projects a tiny red dot forward and the front glass reflects it back to the shooter's eye, simulating a "laser dot" effect on the target.

If you draw a line from the dot source, to the front glass, then back to the shooter's eye (then do this repeatedly as the shooter's eye is moved to different locations), you will see that the front glass needs a specific concave CURVE to always make the dot line up with the point of impact.

That's why the dot seems to move around as you move your head... that's what it's supposed to do.

But be assured, if the red dot is dialed in, what you see is what you get. The bullet hits where the dot is seen, REGARDLESS of where the shooter's eye is.

Try it if you have a red-dot... put the dot on something in your house (like the corner of a picture frame or whatever). Hold the sight still and move your head around.

The dot will seem to move around inside the circle of the front glass, but it will STAY on the target.

Hope this makes sense...

Roger
 
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